5 most controversial moments from London


Not everything goes smoothly during the Olympics. From simple errors to questionable actions by athletes and officials, these five controversial moments from London 2012 will go down in Olympic lore.

5. ‘Sick’ Algerian runner quits race, wins gold
A day before he was to run the 1500m, Algerian middle distance runner Taoufik Makhloufi was thrown out of the Olympics for not trying to win an 800m qualifying heat, a race he didn’t want to compete in but that team officials didn’t withdraw him from in time. So he dogged the race from the start, then quit it altogether. Initially kicked out of the Games for that lack of effort, he was reinstated when he got a doctor’s note saying he wasn’t well enough to compete in the 800m. He won the 1,500m the next day.

4. Which Korea is it?
The first (competition-related) scandal of the Games happened before the Olympics had officially begun. During the introductions of a preliminary soccer game, held two days before the Opening Ceremony, the image of a South Korean flag was displayed next to a North Korean player during introductions. That didn’t go over well with the North Koreans (global politics lesson: North Korea and South Korea aren’t best buds). The North Korean team refused to take the field for mroe than an hour but the game was eventually played.

3. One long second
With :01 left in overtime of her semifinal epee bout, South Korea’s Shin A-lam held a match tiebreaker over her German opponent and had all but punched her ticket to the gold medal match. But questionable judging and timekeeping led to a very long and eventful final second of play, at the end of which A-lam had lost. For the next 70 minutes she refused to leave the piste, since rules dictate that a fencer who leaves the piste accepts the judges’ decision. Her quiet, tearful protest as she sat in the darkened arena will be one of the lasting images of these Games. Her loss was upheld, and she went on to lose the bronze-medal match. She later won a silver medal in the team competition.

2. They’re not even trying
How did badminton, of all sports, ruffled international feathers? In an effort to get better draws during round robin play, two teams from South Korea and one each from Indonesia and China deliberately tried to lose matches, making ‘mistakes’ that even the casual backyard barbecue player would be embarrassed by. All four teams were expelled from the Olympics, but it didn’t bother the Chinese: all five badminton events were still won by teams from China.

1. Boxing and more boxing
Azerbaijani bantamweight Magomed Abdulhamidov got the daylights knocked out of him in the third and final round against Japan’s Satoshi Shimizu, falling or getting knocked down six times and generally looking like a man desperately in need of the white towel; except that the judges’ scored him the win. That decision was overturned on appeal and the ref was dismissed. Then an Azerbaijani heavyweight who was clearly outboxed won his match, too, assuring him a bronze medal. Many wondered if there was a connection between these outcomes and a $9 million loan the International Amateur Boxing Association (AIBA) received from Azerbaijan last year. The AIBA gracefully handled all of the controversy by expelling NBC’s boxing commentators – who were highly critical of the judging – from their ringside seats for the final rounds of competition.

Wagner, Asada, Hanyu headline NHK Trophy in Japan; Grand Prix Final berths on the line

Ashley Wagner
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Three-time U.S. national champion Ashley Wagner looks to qualify for her fourth consecutive Grand Prix Final at this weekend’s NHK Trophy in Nagano, Japan. A medal of any color should be good enough to get her to Barcelona, but she faces a tough field.

Japan’s Mao Asada returned to competition this season and is poised to qualify for the most elite competition since the Sochi Olympics (where she finished sixth) and 2014 World Championships (which she won). Finishing on the podium would earn a berth to the final for Asada. Also in the field are Americans Mirai Nagasu and Courtney Hicks, Japan’s Satoko Miyahara, and one of Russia’s darlings from last season, Anna Pogorilaya.

Olympic champion and last year’s Grand Prix Final winner Yuzuru Hanyu, surely to be the overwhelming crowd favorite in the men’s field, will look to improve his short program results from his other Grand Prix appearance. At Skate Canada, two of his three jumping passes recceived zero points. He rallied in the free skate, finishing second behind Canada’s Patrick Chan. Chan is essentially a lock for the final, while a top three finish would seal the deal for Hanyu.

MORE: Javier Fernandez qualifies for second straight home Grand Prix Final

Other men in the hunt for Grand Prix Final berths competing in Nagano include China’s Jin Boyang and Russia’s Maxim Kovtun, who also need podium finishes to lock up spots in Barcelona. Jin’s and Kovtun’s finishes will likely dictate whether or not American Max Aaron qualifies to the final. More on that process here. No U.S. man has qualified since Jeremy Abbott did it in 2011.

MORE: Jason Brown withdraws from NHK Trophy

Reigining U.S. pairs champions Alexa Scimeca and Chris Knierim can make the Grand Prix Final with a medal in Japan.

The U.S. is sending three ice dance couples to Japan, of which two have a shot at qualifying for Barcelona. Siblings and Sochi Olympians Maia and Alex Shibutani can finish in any 1-2 combination with Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue allowing for both duos to qualify for the final. Madison Chock and Evan Bates, U.S. ice dance champions, already qualified.

Icenetwork.com will stream for subscribers live coverage of men’s, women’s, pairs and ice dance short programs and free skates. NBC and NBC Sports Live Extra will have coverage Sunday from 4-6 p.m. ET.

Men’s short program — Friday, 2:10 a.m. ET (start order here)
Women’s short program — Friday, 5:05 a.m. ET (start order here)
Men’s free skate — Saturday, 2:30 a.m. ET
Women’s free skate — Saturday, 5:35 a.m. ET

Inside the #RoadtoRio photo shoots

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NBC Olympics
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Bringing together over 100 Summer Olympians and Olympic hopefuls with puppies, samba dancers and supermodels, NBC Olympics and the United States Olympic Committee partnered for an extensive five-day media summit in West Hollywood, Ca. The athletes took part in photo shoots, interviews and video segments all in preparation for next summer’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Over the course of the summit, participants shared behind-the-scenes moments on social media using the #RoadtoRio hashtag. NBC Olympics also launched its official Snapchat account, with the username NBCOlympics. Here are some of the highlights:

Olympians fell in puppy love:


Then got a crash course in Brazil’s signature dance, the samba:


A photobooth with props let the athletes–and even Bob Costas–show off their silly sides:


Olympic fans like Alessandra Ambrosio and Flula dropped by:


In between shoots, athletes from different sports mingled:


The faux-Rio beach was the perfect set:


But these Olympic stars needed only a simple white backdrop to shine:

Wait who is the Olympian here! Linnéa stealing the show at the @nbcolympics #roadtorio

A photo posted by Alysia Montaño (@alysiamontano) on


Follow NBC Olympics on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat (username NBCOlympics).


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