5 most controversial moments from London

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Not everything goes smoothly during the Olympics. From simple errors to questionable actions by athletes and officials, these five controversial moments from London 2012 will go down in Olympic lore.

5. ‘Sick’ Algerian runner quits race, wins gold
A day before he was to run the 1500m, Algerian middle distance runner Taoufik Makhloufi was thrown out of the Olympics for not trying to win an 800m qualifying heat, a race he didn’t want to compete in but that team officials didn’t withdraw him from in time. So he dogged the race from the start, then quit it altogether. Initially kicked out of the Games for that lack of effort, he was reinstated when he got a doctor’s note saying he wasn’t well enough to compete in the 800m. He won the 1,500m the next day.

4. Which Korea is it?
The first (competition-related) scandal of the Games happened before the Olympics had officially begun. During the introductions of a preliminary soccer game, held two days before the Opening Ceremony, the image of a South Korean flag was displayed next to a North Korean player during introductions. That didn’t go over well with the North Koreans (global politics lesson: North Korea and South Korea aren’t best buds). The North Korean team refused to take the field for mroe than an hour but the game was eventually played.

3. One long second
With :01 left in overtime of her semifinal epee bout, South Korea’s Shin A-lam held a match tiebreaker over her German opponent and had all but punched her ticket to the gold medal match. But questionable judging and timekeeping led to a very long and eventful final second of play, at the end of which A-lam had lost. For the next 70 minutes she refused to leave the piste, since rules dictate that a fencer who leaves the piste accepts the judges’ decision. Her quiet, tearful protest as she sat in the darkened arena will be one of the lasting images of these Games. Her loss was upheld, and she went on to lose the bronze-medal match. She later won a silver medal in the team competition.

2. They’re not even trying
How did badminton, of all sports, ruffled international feathers? In an effort to get better draws during round robin play, two teams from South Korea and one each from Indonesia and China deliberately tried to lose matches, making ‘mistakes’ that even the casual backyard barbecue player would be embarrassed by. All four teams were expelled from the Olympics, but it didn’t bother the Chinese: all five badminton events were still won by teams from China.

1. Boxing and more boxing
Azerbaijani bantamweight Magomed Abdulhamidov got the daylights knocked out of him in the third and final round against Japan’s Satoshi Shimizu, falling or getting knocked down six times and generally looking like a man desperately in need of the white towel; except that the judges’ scored him the win. That decision was overturned on appeal and the ref was dismissed. Then an Azerbaijani heavyweight who was clearly outboxed won his match, too, assuring him a bronze medal. Many wondered if there was a connection between these outcomes and a $9 million loan the International Amateur Boxing Association (AIBA) received from Azerbaijan last year. The AIBA gracefully handled all of the controversy by expelling NBC’s boxing commentators – who were highly critical of the judging – from their ringside seats for the final rounds of competition.

John Shuster, 30 pounds lighter, rallies for 4th Olympic curling berth

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John Shuster is going to a fourth Olympics. It’s one more chance to prove Urban Dictionary wrong.

Shuster, 30 pounds lighter since his second straight Olympic failure in Sochi, led a team that beat Heath McCormick‘s squad at the U.S. Olympic Trials finals in Omaha on Saturday night.

Shuster, Tyler GeorgeMatt Hamilton and John Landsteiner lost the opener of a best-of-three finals series on Thursday.

They came back to deliver in a pair of must-win games, 9-4 on Friday night and 7-5 on Saturday, after spending each day at the Omaha Zoo.

The new-look Shuster — leaner and, at least this weekend, clutch — would astonish those who know him by scenes at the last two Olympics.

After taking bronze in 2006 as a role player, he led the last two U.S. Olympic teams to 2-7 records in 2010 and in 2014. Last place in Vancouver, where he was benched after an 0-4 start. Next to last place in Sochi.

After the last Olympics, the former bartender from Chisholm, Minn., was left off USA Curling’s 10-man high performance team.

He took it as motivation to get in shape.

Shuster, a father of a 2- and a 4-year-old who once said, “If I don’t have pizza three or four times a week, I’m not happy,” now totes meal replacement shakes. He’s starting to enjoy Olympic lifting.

Shuster, George, Hamilton and Landsteiner, all absent from that USA Curling high performance list, formed their own team. They became Team USA in their first season together and represented the Stars and Stripes at worlds in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

Their results — fourth, third and fifth —  marked the best string of U.S. men’s or women’s finishes at that level in a decade.

Shuster is set to join Debbie McCormick as the only Americans to curl at four Olympics. The sport was part of the first Winter Games in 1924, then absent as a medal sport until 1998.

“I don’t think it’s about the four Olympics for me,” Shuster said on NBCSN. “What this is about — and what I’m about — is getting my teammates to now. I have two new Olympians on this team, and I know how special that is.”

George, the 35-year-old vice skip for Shuster, led a team that lost to Shuster in the 2010 Olympic Trials final. The liquor store manager from Duluth, Minn., is going to his first Winter Games.

As is the 28-year-old Hamilton, whose younger sister qualified for PyeongChang earlier Saturday.

Landsteiner, a 27-year-old corrosion engineer, played with Shuster since 2011, including in Sochi.

Alternate Joe Polo can go 12 years between Olympic appearances after taking bronze on that Torino team.

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MORE: U.S. Winter Olympic Trials broadcast schedule

Katie Ledecky wins race by 54 seconds, breaks record

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Katie Ledecky is back at Stanford and back to pulverizing distance races.

The sophomore and five-time Olympic champion won a 1,650-yard freestyle by 54.45 seconds at a meet at Texas A&M on Saturday night.

The runner-up was in a different heat; Ledecky won her heat by 1:02.16.

Ledecky lowered her own American record, clocking 15:03.31. She had the previous mark of 15:03.92 set last Nov. 20.

Ledecky had every swimmer lapped in the 25-yard pool before the halfway point and ended up lapping everyone twice.

The men also raced a 1,650 on Saturday. The winner clocked 15:18.95, which was 15.64 seconds slower than Ledecky’s time.

Full results are here.

The 1,650 is the longest race on the NCAA program, while the longest race at the Olympics and world championships is the 1500m.

The No. 2 woman all-time in the 1,650 is triple 2008 Olympic medalist Katie Hoff, a full 21.04 seconds slower.

Ledecky owns the 1500m world record, too, 13.4 seconds faster than any other woman in history.

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MORE: Michael Phelps’ discussion with Katie Ledecky after 2017 Worlds