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6 best swims of the London Games

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The swimming competition at the London Olympics certainly provided a tremendous amount of exciting moments. Here is a quick list of the top six best swims of the meet:

6. Michael Phelps wins 100m butterfly
After touching seventh at the turn, Phelps surged over the last 50 meters to win by 0.23 seconds. That margin of victory was impressive considering he won by 0.04 in Athens and by 0.01 in Beijing. No other male swimmer had ever won the same event in three straight Olympics before Phelps and this was his second time doing it in London. His terrific meet also included a victory in the 200m IM over Ryan Lochte; who likewise deserves a shout out for his gold-medal performance in the 400m IM.

5. Sun Yang smashes his own world record in 1500m freestyle
After jumping in the pool on a starter’s miscue (and showing clear frustration after having his concentration broken) Sun took complete control of the men’s 1500m. He paced well ahead of his previous world record the entire race, and his final time of 14:31.02 was more than three seconds faster. Adding Sun’s win in the 400m freestyle, and Ye Shiwen’s victories in the 200m and 400m IM made it an incredible meet for the Chinese standouts.

4. U.S. Women break the world record in the 4x100m medley relay
The star-studded medley relay of Missy Franklin, Rebecca Soni, Dana Vollmer and Allison Schmitt ended their meet fittingly with a gold medal and a world record. Each member of the relay had already won individual gold in London, and then pulled their strengths to break the world mark by 0.14 seconds. Looking at their individual performances; Soni became the first woman to break 2:20 in the 200m breaststroke, Vollmer was the first ever under 56 seconds in the 100m butterfly, and Schmitt took home five medals.

3. 15-year-old Katie Ledecky wins the 800m free
The youngest athlete on the U.S. Olympic team took her race out fearlessly ahead of a field that included defending Olympic champion and host favorite, Rebecca Adlington. Ledecky never fell out of the lead after the first 150 meters, posted a new personal best time in her 400m split (4:04.34), and broke Janet Evans’ American Record (the longest standing American record on the books), in finishing with a time of 8:14.63.

2. Missy Franklin breaks world record in 200m back
Missy had an outstanding meet before her 200m backstroke, and then gave a performance in her signature event that put her at a whole new level. Missy swam a near perfect race from start to finish, beating the next closest finisher by 1.86 seconds and shattering the world record by 0.75 seconds. It was stunning to watch how flawlessly the 17-year-old handled the pressure of her first Olympics, and she shone brightest when the most was expected of her.

1. Nathan Adrian wins 100m free by 0.01 seconds.
Adrian slid under the radar in London as most of the attention was paid to reigning world champ James Magnussen and Brazil’s Cesar Cielo. But Adrian stayed close enough to Magnussen early, then edged past him to out-touch the Australian by 0.01 seconds. It wasn’t a new world record, or even an American record, but it was the type of gritty, hard-fought race that makes the sport of swimming worth watching. The pure elation in Adrian’s face after he touched the wall summed up what it means to be an Olympic champion, and made his race the most exciting swim of the London Games.

World Health Organization rejects Olympic postponement call

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BERLIN (AP) — The World Health Organization said there is “no public health justification” for postponing or canceling the Rio Olympics because of the Zika outbreak.

The assessment, in a statement early Saturday, came after 150 health experts issued an open letter to the U.N. health agency calling for the Games to be delayed or relocated “in the name of public health.”

Friday’s letter cited recent scientific evidence that the Zika virus causes severe birth defects, most notably babies born with abnormally small heads. In adults, it can cause neurological problems, including a rare syndrome that can be fatal or result in temporary paralysis.

The authors also noted that despite increased efforts to wipe out the mosquitoes that spread Zika, the number of infections in Rio have gone up rather than down.

WHO, however, said that “based on current assessment, cancelling or changing the location of the 2016 Olympics will not significantly alter the international spread of Zika virus.”

Several public health academics have previously warned that having hundreds of thousands of people travel to the Aug. 5-21 Games in Brazil will inevitably lead to the births of more brain-damaged babies and speed up the virus’ global spread.

The Geneva-based U.N. health agency argued that Brazil is one of almost 60 countries and territories which are reporting transmission of the virus by mosquitoes, and that “people continue to travel between these countries and territories for a variety of reasons.”

“Based on the current assessment of Zika virus circulating in almost 60 countries globally and 39 in the Americas, there is no public health justification for postponing or cancelling the games,” it said. “WHO will continue to monitor the situation and update our advice as necessary.”

It pointed to existing advice for pregnant women not to travel to areas with Zika virus transmission, among other recommendations.

WHO declared the spread of Zika in the Americas to be a global emergency in February.

Its statement Saturday made no direct reference to the health experts’ letter, which also highlighted the decades-long collaboration between WHO and the International Olympic Committee.

The authors said the “overly close” relationship “was last affirmed in 2010 at an event where the Director-General of WHO and president of the IOC signed a memorandum of understanding, which is secret because neither has disclosed it.”

The IOC rejected the idea that the two organizations are too close, saying in an emailed comment that it “does not currently have an MoU with the World Health Organization.”

The last one, it added, “outlined cooperation between the two organizations to promote physical activity to fight strokes, heart attacks, diabetes and obesity.”

MORE: Rio Olympic, Paralympic medals reveal date set

Mo Farah leads Olympic, World champions notching wins at Pre Classic

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EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — Olympic champion Mo Farah of Great Britain won his third 10,000m title in the Prefontaine Classic on Friday night.

Farah, who 2012 Olympic 5000m and 10,000m titles, pulled out front with about two laps to go and withstood Kenyan William Malel Sitonik with a surge on the final turn to finish in 26 minutes, 53.71 seconds at Hayward Field.

“I am really happy where I am,” Farah said. “I am in a lot better shape than I was in 2012.”

It was Farah’s second straight victory in the event at Pre and third overall. In all three wins he has finished under the 27-minute mark.

The 33-year-old’s last outdoor events on a track came at August’s World Championships in Beijing, where he swept the 5000m and 10,000m at a second straight Worlds.

Farah trains with the Nike Oregon Project. His teammate, U.S. Olympic silver medalist Galen Rupp, opted not to run at Pre and instead focus on the Olympic Trials in July. Rupp has already made the Olympic marathon team, but he could make a bid for a double in the 10,000m.

The Prefontaine Classic continues Saturday with coverage on NBC, NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra beginning at 3:30 p.m. ET. A full broadcast schedule is here.

Kenyan Hellen Obiri won the women’s 5000m in 14:32.02, surging on the final lap for a personal best. The top American finisher was Molly Huddle, 16 seconds behind for 11th place.

Olympian Alysia Montaño won the 800m in 2:00.78. Known for running with a flower in her hair, Montaño is a six-time U.S. 800m champion.

“I knew it was going to be a little cold, a little windy,” she said. “So I knew it was going to be a little bit different, like in terms of just feeling it out and not going for a really quick time.”

World champion Joe Kovacs won the shot put with a throw of 72 feet, 7 ¼ inches, the best mark in the world this season. Croatian Olympic champion Sandra Perković won the women’s discus. Earlier, two-time World champion Pawel Fajdek of Poland won the men’s hammer.

U.S. Olympic champion Brittney Reese won the long jump with a leap of 22-8½.

“Just to get that win, it sets me up good for my season, and it shows that I’m in form and good shape going into Rio,” Reese said.

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