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USOC CEO believes Olympic relevance will grow

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Grantland’s Bill Simmons once questioned the potential lifespan of the Olympics, since it sometimes collapses economies even though many people only appreciate its relevance for 17 days every two years. He’s suggested that the Games will someday disappear and the World Cup will take its place, maybe once America can adequately compete in soccer (so, roughly never).

But USOC CEO Scott Blackmun thinks the London Games are an excellent example of how the event can create social change and shape culture around the world with its ideals of “openness and inclusion,” and it doesn’t sound like he’s too worried about it disappearing. He told the USA Today that he sees a lot of room for growth over the next 30 years.

“[The Olympics are] a values-based movement,” Blackmun said. “If you look at what happened in Qatar, Brunei, and Saudi Arabia, where they had women competing for the first time, I think we’ve got tangible evidence coming out of these Games that the Olympic Games are making a difference not only in sport but in a broader context. As I look ahead, I think the Olympic Games are only going to increase in their relevance.”

London seems to have avoided a financial apocalypse, and we hope the Olympics won’t cripple Rio – though, ironically, it might be the infrastructure created by the 2014 World Cup that saves it – but for as much havoc as it can levy on the books, we think Blackmun is right.

We might need to be smarter about where they take place, which is to stay Istanbul in 2020 instead of Madrid, but the Olympics are an important event that has pushed the world in the right direction racially, socially, and culturally for 116 years. We need to make sure they survive, even if many people only appreciate its relevance for 17 days ever two years.

Nick Symmonds auctions body ad space for double 2012 amount

Nick Symmonds
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U.S. 800m runner Nick Symmonds‘ right shoulder is apparently twice as valuable as his left shoulder.

The two-time Olympian auctioned ad space on his body for a second straight Olympic summer, with the final bid at $21,800 for nine square inches on his right shoulder in an Ebay auction that ended Thursday afternoon.

T-Mobile CEO John Legere‘s Twitter account claimed the winning bid of 107 overall bids.

In 2012, Symmonds auctioned the same nine inches on his left shoulder for $11,100 to Hanson Dodge Creative, a marketing agency based in Milwaukee. Here’s what that temporary tattoo looked like.

Symmonds’ temporary tattoo was not visible during the 2012 Olympics or 2012 Olympic Trials, as rules mandate the advertisement is taped over in those events plus other IAAF competitions.

Symmonds, 32, finished fifth at the 2012 Olympics and second at the 2013 World Championships.

He was left off the 2015 World Championships roster, after winning the national title, after refusing to sign a USA Track and Field contract that required athletes to wear Nike-branded Team USA gear at team functions at Worlds.

Symmonds’ apparel sponsor has been Brooks since January 2014. He was previously a Nike-sponsored Oregon Track Club member for seven years.

MORE: Mother, son set to compete in same Olympics for first time

Karch Kiraly to remain U.S. women’s volleyball coach through 2020

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Karch Kiraly will continue as U.S. women’s volleyball team head coach through the 2020 Olympics, agreeing to a four-year contract renewal.

“It’s been a tremendous honor to lead this special group of intelligent, powerful, hard-working, dedicated women, and the great staff that supports them — and it’s a double honor to prepare for battle at the Rio Olympics, knowing we’ll have the opportunity to carry that work forward in the next quadrennial,” Kiraly said in a press release.

Kiraly, the only U.S. volleyball player to earn indoor and beach Olympic titles, took over after serving on Hugh McCutcheon‘s staff from 2009 through the 2012 Olympics, where the U.S. women took silver behind Brazil.

Kiraly then led the U.S. women to their first World or Olympic title in 2014. They are ranked No. 1 in the world ahead of China and Brazil.

The program has gone 50 years with zero Olympic golds and broke a 62-year World Championship drought in 2014.

Kiraly, 55, is set to become the first coach of multiple U.S. Olympic women’s volleyball teams since Terry Liskevych from 1988 through 1996.

MORE: U.S. women’s volleyball team inspired by tennis legend