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USOC CEO believes Olympic relevance will grow

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Grantland’s Bill Simmons once questioned the potential lifespan of the Olympics, since it sometimes collapses economies even though many people only appreciate its relevance for 17 days every two years. He’s suggested that the Games will someday disappear and the World Cup will take its place, maybe once America can adequately compete in soccer (so, roughly never).

But USOC CEO Scott Blackmun thinks the London Games are an excellent example of how the event can create social change and shape culture around the world with its ideals of “openness and inclusion,” and it doesn’t sound like he’s too worried about it disappearing. He told the USA Today that he sees a lot of room for growth over the next 30 years.

“[The Olympics are] a values-based movement,” Blackmun said. “If you look at what happened in Qatar, Brunei, and Saudi Arabia, where they had women competing for the first time, I think we’ve got tangible evidence coming out of these Games that the Olympic Games are making a difference not only in sport but in a broader context. As I look ahead, I think the Olympic Games are only going to increase in their relevance.”

London seems to have avoided a financial apocalypse, and we hope the Olympics won’t cripple Rio – though, ironically, it might be the infrastructure created by the 2014 World Cup that saves it – but for as much havoc as it can levy on the books, we think Blackmun is right.

We might need to be smarter about where they take place, which is to stay Istanbul in 2020 instead of Madrid, but the Olympics are an important event that has pushed the world in the right direction racially, socially, and culturally for 116 years. We need to make sure they survive, even if many people only appreciate its relevance for 17 days ever two years.

No Zika cases from Olympics, WHO says

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 12:  An aerial view of the Christ The Redeemer statue (F) and the Maracana Stadium (B) on November 12, 2013 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)
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There have been zero Zika virus cases stemming from the Rio Olympics, the World Health Organization said Thursday.

“From the reports WHO received from national health authorities, there have so far been no laboratory confirmed cases of Zika virus in anyone associated with the Olympics,” the organization said in an online update Thursday.

Earlier this summer, several athletes cited Zika concerns in skipping the Olympics.

The World Health Organization said before the Rio Games that the Olympics posed “a very low risk” of accelerating the Zika virus spread around the world.

Thousands of athletes will come to Rio for the Paralympics that run from Sept. 7-18, which is still during Brazil’s winter, lessening the Zika risk.

MORE: Hope Solo banned 6 months after Olympic comments

Devon Allen weighs turning pro in track and field

Devon Allen
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University of Oregon hurdler and wide receiver Devon Allen said he “thinks” he’s turning pro in track, but also said he hasn’t really decided if his NCAA track career is finished Thursday.

“There’s not really much more I can do in college track other than break the collegiate record,” Allen said.

Allen, a University of Oregon junior, finished fifth in the Rio Olympic 110m hurdles on Aug. 16 after winning the Olympic Trials on July 9.

Allen can turn pro in track and field and still play football for the Ducks, so long as he keeps his track and field profits to prize money and not endorsement deals.

He’s definitely planning on playing for Oregon’s football team this season, perhaps even in the season opener Sept. 3.

As for track season next winter and spring, that’s looking unlikely. Allen noted that he has won NCAA individual and team titles.

The only missing piece is the NCAA record of 13.00 set by former world-record holder Renaldo Nehemiah. Allen’s personal best is 13.03.

It’s clear that Allen would like to be a professional in both track and football.

“The NFL is something I’ve been dreaming about doing, just like I dreamed about running in the Olympics,” said Allen, who caught nine passes for 94 yards last season, coming back from tearing knee ligaments in the Rose Bowl. “I kind of accomplished that Olympic dream, obviously, in four years, I want to win a gold medal, so that’s one more step to that dream. Now my next dream is to play in the NFL.”

VIDEO: Top track and field moments from Rio Olympics