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Ben Johnson doc “9.79*” and the 1988 controversy

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After witnessing Usain Bolt run 9.58, 9.63, and 9.69 in the 100m, and seeing six other men dip below the 9.80 mark since Beijing four years ago, it’s becoming more and more difficult to remember a time when just breaking 10 seconds was an incredible feat.

But before the 1988 Seoul Games, 9.83 was the benchmark, set by Canadian specimen Ben Johnson who pumped his imposing frame to victory at the ’87 world championships in Rome. A year later, convicted of doping and stripped of his gold medal, he was made an example and a pariah by the IOC.

Johnson’s story is told in the documentary “9.79*,” premiering Tuesday at 8pm EDT on ESPN.  But the film is really the story of two men: Johnson and American hero Carl Lewis, both of whom – the film hints – used every bit of human will and scientific assistance to fight for the title of “worlds fastest man.”

And while it’s Johnson and his performance-enhanced 9.79 that are once again clearly under the microscope, it’s Lewis’s bitter protest, even as he now holds the event’s gold medal nearly 25 years later, that stands out in stark contrast to Johnson’s blunt honesty. After all, Johnson has nothing more to hide.

Director Daniel Gordon does an excellent job of putting both facts and rumors on the table and letting the two men speak for themselves. Then he adds the important context by interviewing doctors, coaches, managers, IOC lab techs, and the other six finalists from the ’88 race, and puts together a Ken-Burns-esque documentary that is arguably the best, most cinematic of ESPN’s “30 for 30″ series to date.

After all is said, Gordon, neither prosecutor nor defender, leaves us to be the jury. We’ll never know if Lewis doped or if Johnson was sabotoged, but we can lean with help from the film, which details how Lewis tested positive for three stimulants at the ’88 U.S. Trials before the USOC deemed it an “inadvertent positive.”

For now, Lewis lives on in the record books as track’s most decorated Olympian. Johnson is just a cheater. We know it’s an accurate tag, but we’re not sure it’s one he should wear alone.

Lolo Jones praises Ezekiel Elliott’s ‘perfect hurdle form’

ARLINGTON, TX - SEPTEMBER 25:  Ezekiel Elliott #21 of the Dallas Cowboys hurdles Chris Prosinski #31 of the Chicago Bears while carrying the ball in the fourth quarter at AT&T Stadium on September 25, 2016 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott was running down the open field when he encountered Chicago Bears safety Chris Prosinski.

Prosinski went low and Elliott, a high school state champion in the 110m and 300m hurdles, decided to go high and hurdle the defender:

The track and field community took notice of Elliott’s hurdle.

Lolo Jones, a 100m hurdler who competed at the 2008 and 2012 Olympics, gave Elliott grades of an A++ for difficulty and an A for technique on Twitter. She wrote that it “hands down would’ve been best NFL hurdle technique of the yr.” if a second Bears defender, Jonathan Anderson, hadn’t prevented Elliott from landing cleanly:

Dawn Harper-Nelson, the 2008 Olympic champion and 2012 Olympic silver medalist in the 100m hurdles, also had a positive review of Elliott’s efforts:

Emma Coburn, the 2016 Olympic 3000m steeplechase bronze medalist, thought Elliott’s leap resembled her event:

Elliott finished with 30 carries for 140 yards to lead the Cowboys to a 31-17 win during Sunday Night Football.

His mother, Dawn, who was a track and field athlete at the University of Missouri, posted a photo on Twitter to remind everyone where her son inherited his hurling gene from:

MORE: Marquise Goodwin scores touchdown, celebrates with long jump (video)

Rome’s city council to vote Thursday on 2024 Olympics bid

Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Malago' gestures during a press conference, after a scheduled meeting with Rome mayor Virginia Raggi did not take place, in Rome, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi has rejected the city's bid for the 2024 Olympic Games, effectively dooming the candidacy. (Giuseppe Lami/ANSA via AP Photo)
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ROME (AP) — Rome’s city council will vote Thursday whether to support Mayor Virginia Raggi‘s rejection of the city’s bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics.

The motion is expected to pass easily since Raggi’s anti-establishment 5-Star Movement holds a majority on the city council.

Raggi announced her formal opposition of the candidacy in a news conference last week, citing concerns over high costs given the city is barely able to have its trash picked up.

Raggi’s rejection occurred four years after then-Premier Mario Monti stopped Rome’s plans to bid for the 2020 Summer Olympics because of financial concerns.

If the motion is approved, it would leave only Los Angeles, Paris and Budapest, Hungary, in the running for 2024. The International Olympic Committee will decide on the host city in September 2017.

MORE: Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi rejects city’s 2024 Olympic bid