Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports

London spins gold with tourism numbers

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Let the London Olympics Economics Games Begin!

Whatever happens during an Olympics, it takes some time to accurately measure how successful a Games was for the host city. Lots of questions have to be answered about the long-term viability of the permanent venues; the success or failure of the typical revitalization of the neighborhoods that usually surround the Olympic Village; and, perhaps most importantly, the short- and long-term economic benefits to the host city and nation.

The tally on the economic piece of that puzzle is starting to filter in and how one reads the verdict depends on how they view interior volumes of half-full drinking glasses. That’s because, according to figures out last week, instead of getting an Olympic bump in tourism London actually saw seven percent fewer visitors to the capital city than in 2011.

Yet, despite that disappointing figure, tourism revenue actually hit an all-time high in August: 2.38 billion pounds (that’s 3.82 billion dollars to you Americans out there).

Analysts claim that the jump in revenue was the result of those visitors who did come spent their money freely. Very freely, actually: Average spending in London during August was supposedly over 1,000 pounds a second (there’s no sense in applying the pound-dollar conversion rate for such an odd statistic).

Naturally the British government and tourism officials are taking the positive spin on this and chalking this up in the “London 2012 Games Were A Smashing, Historic Success – Hooray For Great Britain!” category. Grumpy British sourpusses are putting it in the “We Beg To Differ – Politely, Of Course, Because We’re British” column, and one particularly dour Briton who lives and dies by the tourism trade flatly refused to accept the government’s shiny, happy view of the numbers.

“From pubs, to theatres, to shops and taxi drivers, there is not a single person I have spoken to since the Olympics that did not suffer,” he told The Independent. “The Games were a roaring success – it’s a great shame that we can’t say the same for British tourism in 2012.”

It’s unclear where all of the extra money spent went if not to pubs, theatre, shops and taxi drivers, but it seems likely that this guy is more concerned with the amount of oxygen than beer in his pint glass when he goes out drinking. Maybe because he doesn’t have a ton of money to throw around right now.

BuzzFeed scares Olympians with a live turkey

Buzzfeed Turkey
BuzzFeed Video / Via
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In honor of Thanksgiving, our friends at BuzzFeed decided to surprise several Olympians with a live turkey.

Watch your favorite Olympians practice their turkey calls, and even take selfies with the bird:

Athletes featured in the video:

Tori Bowie (Track & Field)

Matt Centrowitz (Track & Field)

Dawn Harper-Nelson (Track & Field)

Jenny Simpson (Track & Field)

Katelin Snyder (Rowing)

MORE: NBC Olympics Thanksgiving Rio promo

Bobsled Olympic medalist Steve Langton retires

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 03:  (BROADCAST-OUT)  Steve Langton of the United States Bobsled team poses for a portrait ahead of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics on February 3, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
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Steve Langton, who was described by driver Steven Holcomb as the “best push athlete in the world,” announced his retirement today.

A collegiate sprinter and jumper at Northeastern University, Langton decided to try bobsledding after watching the 2006 Winter Olympics. He filled out an online athlete resume, and, by the 2010 Games, he was an Olympian.

At the Sochi 2014 Games, Langton teamed with Holcomb to win a bronze medal in the two-man race. It was the first Olympic medal in the event by American sled since 1952. He claimed another bronze medal as a member of Holcomb’s four-man “Night Train.”

“In Sochi I competed on the world’s biggest stage, I won two medals for my country and I did so along not only the best teammates but best friends anyone could ever ask for,” Langton told USA Bobsled.

Langton, who has a 62-inch standing box jump and can squat more than 500 pounds, was described by Men’s Health as “the most powerful winter Olympian” in the lead-up to 2014 Games.

“[Langton’s] work ethic and discipline rubbed off on the other athletes and made everyone better,” said USA Bobsled & Skeleton Chief Executive Officer Darrin Steele. “I have no doubt that he’ll find success in the next chapter of his life as well.”

Langton appeared on “The Amazing Race” in 2015 with his girlfriend, Aly Dudek, an Olympic short track speedskater.

None of the push athletes on the current U.S. roster have Olympic experience. Holcomb will compete in the World Cup opener this Saturday with Sam McGuffie, a former University of Michigan football player. The race will be McGuffie’s World Cup debut.