Did Aussie swimmers sleepwalk through London?

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Note to all the young swimmers out there: Don’t take sleeping pills before a big meet.

Led by James Magnussen, the Aussie men’s 4x100m freestyle relay team was the talk of London heading into the Olympics last summer. The squad was favored to finish first or second, but what happened in the pool was something nobody saw coming.

A fourth-place finish. No medal. And three days later, Magnussen lost a close 100m freestyle to American Nathan Adrian (Magnussen was the reigning world champ in the event).

Since then, stories about problems on the Aussie swim team have surfaced. Some have pointed fingers at the coaches and management, while others have put the blame squarely on the swimmers’ shoulders. At any rate, it seems like the Aussies were not a cohesive unit like the Americans were (remember this video?).

And now this: A story in the Sydney’s Daily Telegraph claims there may have been some illegal drug use amongst the team in the form of a sleeping pill called Stillnox. Which, by the way, was banned by the Australian Olympic Committee shortly before the team departed for London.

According to the article, the members of the 4x100m freestyle relay team made prank calls to teammates in the middle of the night and banged on hotel room doors. Rumors swirled of the junior members on the team taking Stillnox as a right of passage.

The swimmers were not allowed to drink alcohol but there was talk about some of them not being able to stand up and others who would slide to the floor while sitting on their beds.

Australia won 10 swimming medals in London – one gold, six silver and three bronze – which was ruled a disappointment by the nation’s sport ministers. A review is ongoing to determine why the medal count was so low.

There’s also an ongoing investigation looking into the claims of drug use. Magnussen would neither confirm nor deny the Stillnox rumors in an interview with Sky Sports Radio.

Call us crazy, but we think it would be best if swimmers steered clear of sleeping pills before the Olympics. Illegal or not.

Miles Chamley-Watson takes fencing to New York City streets (video)

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Miles Chamley-Watson may be an Olympian and World champion, but many people with those titles can walk the streets of New York with nobody looking twice.

It’s a different story when he’s in competition uniform.

Chamley-Watson showed just how useful his fencing training, stances and equipment — especially his foil blade — can be.

The 29-year-old Chamley-Watson just missed an Olympic medal three years ago, finishing fourth with the U.S. foil team in London. He also fell in the round of 32 in the individual foil.

Chamley-Watson, a 6-foot-4, tattooed model, rebounded to win the 2013 World Championship individually. 

However, he is not assured of making the Rio Olympic team.

Chamley-Watson is ranked No. 11 in the world, behind three other Americans — No. 1 Race Imboden, No. 3 Alexander Massialas and No. 8 Gerek Meinhardt.
A maximum of three Americans can compete individually in Rio in the foil. Three would also compete in the team event, with, possibly, a fourth fencer as a replacement athlete who could be subbed in and out during the team event rounds.

MORE FENCING: How much longer will Mariel Zagunis compete?

Boules bids for 2024 Olympic inclusion

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 (AP) — The sport of boules has launched a bid to be included in the 2024 Olympics.

The Bowls Sports World Confederation, which is recognized by the International Olympic Committee, is campaigning on behalf of three disciplines: the French petanque, the Boule Lyonnaise and the Raffa, a version of the game popular in Italy.

According to the international world games association, about 20 million people regularly play boules in France and Italy, and more than 2 million players are licensed in 150 other countries.

Under new IOC rules, Olympic host cities can propose the addition of one or more sports to their games. Paris and Rome are among the five cities bidding for the 2024 Games, along with Los Angeles, Budapest and Hamburg.

MORE: Complete 2024 Olympic bidding coverage