Did Aussie swimmers sleepwalk through London?

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Note to all the young swimmers out there: Don’t take sleeping pills before a big meet.

Led by James Magnussen, the Aussie men’s 4x100m freestyle relay team was the talk of London heading into the Olympics last summer. The squad was favored to finish first or second, but what happened in the pool was something nobody saw coming.

A fourth-place finish. No medal. And three days later, Magnussen lost a close 100m freestyle to American Nathan Adrian (Magnussen was the reigning world champ in the event).

Since then, stories about problems on the Aussie swim team have surfaced. Some have pointed fingers at the coaches and management, while others have put the blame squarely on the swimmers’ shoulders. At any rate, it seems like the Aussies were not a cohesive unit like the Americans were (remember this video?).

And now this: A story in the Sydney’s Daily Telegraph claims there may have been some illegal drug use amongst the team in the form of a sleeping pill called Stillnox. Which, by the way, was banned by the Australian Olympic Committee shortly before the team departed for London.

According to the article, the members of the 4x100m freestyle relay team made prank calls to teammates in the middle of the night and banged on hotel room doors. Rumors swirled of the junior members on the team taking Stillnox as a right of passage.

The swimmers were not allowed to drink alcohol but there was talk about some of them not being able to stand up and others who would slide to the floor while sitting on their beds.

Australia won 10 swimming medals in London – one gold, six silver and three bronze – which was ruled a disappointment by the nation’s sport ministers. A review is ongoing to determine why the medal count was so low.

There’s also an ongoing investigation looking into the claims of drug use. Magnussen would neither confirm nor deny the Stillnox rumors in an interview with Sky Sports Radio.

Call us crazy, but we think it would be best if swimmers steered clear of sleeping pills before the Olympics. Illegal or not.

Ex-USA Gymnastics doctor faces at least 25 years in prison

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DETROIT (AP) — A sports doctor accused of molesting several girls while working for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University will plead guilty to multiple charges of sexual assault and face at least 25 years in prison, a person with knowledge of the agreement said Tuesday.

The person was not authorized to publicly discuss the agreement ahead of a Wednesday court hearing for Dr. Larry Nassar in Michigan’s Ingham County and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Nassar, 54, is charged with molesting seven girls, all but one of whom were gymnasts, mostly under the guise of treatment at his Lansing-area home and a campus clinic. He’s facing similar charges in a neighboring county and lawsuits filed by more than 125 women and girls.

Olympians Aly Raisman and McKayla Maroney are among the women who have publicly said they were among Nassar’s victims.

The plea deal in Ingham County calls for a minimum prison sentence of 25 years, but a judge could set the minimum sentence as high as 40 years. In Michigan, inmates are eligible for parole after serving a minimum sentence.

The girls have testified that Nassar molested them with his hands, sometimes when a parent was present in the room, while they sought help for gymnastics injuries.

“He convinced these girls that this was some type of legitimate treatment,” Assistant Attorney General Angela Poviliatis told a judge last summer. “Why would they question him? Why would they question this gymnastics god?”

Separately, Nassar is charged with similar crimes in Eaton County, the location of an elite gymnastics club. He also is awaiting sentencing in federal court on child pornography charges.

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MORE: Aly Raisman in book: ‘Horrible memories’ with Larry Nassar

Gabby Douglas: ‘We were abused by Larry Nassar’

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Gabby Douglas is the third member of the 2012 U.S. Olympic team to say she was abused by then-USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar.

“It would be like saying that because of the leotards we wore, it was our fault that we were abused by Larry Nassar,” was part of a post on Douglas’ Instagram on Tuesday apologizing for a Friday tweet that generated criticism. “I didn’t publicly share my experiences as well as many other things because for years we were conditioned to stay silent and honestly some things were extremely painful.”

They marked Douglas’ first public comments about Nassar since many gymnasts said starting last year that the doctor sexually abused them under the guise of medical treatment.

It wasn’t totally clear from her post whether Douglas, the 2012 Olympic all-around champion, said she was abused, but one of her representatives confirmed it, according to multiple reports.

Douglas’ post came four days after her comment on teammate Aly Raisman‘s tweet generated criticism (see below).

Raisman said two weeks ago that she was sexually abused by Nassar while on the national team.

A third 2012 Olympian, McKayla Maroney, said last month that she was sexually abused by Nassar during her national-team career.

Nassar is in jail in Michigan awaiting sentencing after pleading guilty to possession of child pornography.

He’s also awaiting trial on separate criminal sexual conduct charges and has been sued by more than 125 women alleging abuse.

Nassar pleaded not guilty to the assault charges but is expected to change pleas to guilty Wednesday and on Nov. 29 in bids to close criminal cases against him.

“We are appalled by the conduct of which Larry Nassar is accused, and we are very sorry that any athlete has been harmed during her or his gymnastics career,” USA Gymnastics said in a statement last week. “Aly’s passion and concern for athlete safety is shared by USA Gymnastics. Our athletes are our priority, and we are committed to promoting an environment of empowerment that encourages speaking up, especially on difficult topics like abuse, as well the protection of athletes at all levels throughout our gymnastics community.”

Douglas last competed at the Rio Olympics and has not publicly said whether she will return to competition.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

please hear my heart

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