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Did Aussie swimmers sleepwalk through London?

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Note to all the young swimmers out there: Don’t take sleeping pills before a big meet.

Led by James Magnussen, the Aussie men’s 4x100m freestyle relay team was the talk of London heading into the Olympics last summer. The squad was favored to finish first or second, but what happened in the pool was something nobody saw coming.

A fourth-place finish. No medal. And three days later, Magnussen lost a close 100m freestyle to American Nathan Adrian (Magnussen was the reigning world champ in the event).

Since then, stories about problems on the Aussie swim team have surfaced. Some have pointed fingers at the coaches and management, while others have put the blame squarely on the swimmers’ shoulders. At any rate, it seems like the Aussies were not a cohesive unit like the Americans were (remember this video?).

And now this: A story in the Sydney’s Daily Telegraph claims there may have been some illegal drug use amongst the team in the form of a sleeping pill called Stillnox. Which, by the way, was banned by the Australian Olympic Committee shortly before the team departed for London.

According to the article, the members of the 4x100m freestyle relay team made prank calls to teammates in the middle of the night and banged on hotel room doors. Rumors swirled of the junior members on the team taking Stillnox as a right of passage.

The swimmers were not allowed to drink alcohol but there was talk about some of them not being able to stand up and others who would slide to the floor while sitting on their beds.

Australia won 10 swimming medals in London – one gold, six silver and three bronze – which was ruled a disappointment by the nation’s sport ministers. A review is ongoing to determine why the medal count was so low.

There’s also an ongoing investigation looking into the claims of drug use. Magnussen would neither confirm nor deny the Stillnox rumors in an interview with Sky Sports Radio.

Call us crazy, but we think it would be best if swimmers steered clear of sleeping pills before the Olympics. Illegal or not.

Jesse Owens, 1936 Olympians receive recognition at White House

Jesse Owens
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WASHINGTON (AP) — Shortly after Jesse Owens returned home from his snubbing by Adolph Hitler at the 1936 Olympics, he and America’s 17 other black Olympians found a less-than-welcoming reception from their own government, as well.

On Thursday, relatives of those 1936 African-American Olympians will be welcomed to the White House and will get to shake the president’s hand – an honor Owens and the others didn’t receive, the way some of their white counterparts did, after they returned home from Berlin 80 years ago.

U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun announced the visit Wednesday night at a Team USA Awards ceremony.

“That is why I’m here 80 years later, to recognize the senselessness (of not inviting them to the White House), and to pay tribute to all the progress that has come since,” Blackmun said.

The announcement came on the same night the USOC invited Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who were booted from the 1968 Olympics for their gloved-fist protest on the medals stand, to be part of the awards show. Smith and Carlos hadn’t been involved in an official USOC event since being sent home from Mexico City. The gold- and bronze-medal-winning sprinters will be at the White House on Thursday, as well.

At the 1936 Olympics , Owens won four gold medals, but it was the message Owens’ victories sent by winning in Nazi Germany and undercutting Hitler’s white-supremacy dogma that stood as the lasting memory of those games.

Owens returned to a segregated America where he had trouble finding steady work and where, according to his interviews in later years, the president, Franklin Roosevelt, never sent him any words of congratulations or an invitation to the White House.

Decades later, Owens was acknowledged and honored at the White House. In 1976, President Gerald Ford presented him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The stories of the other 17 blacks on that team were less-widely known. Thursday’s event was meant to give a long-overdue White House recognition to those athletes, who accounted for 14 of America’s 56 medals in Berlin.

Owens’ daughter, Marlene Owens-Rankin, will be among the relatives at the White House.

“To be able to go to the White House 80 years later with Barack Obama as president and also with the other 1936 Olympians that really didn’t get the exposure that my grandfather did, for various reasons, I think it would make him so happy,” said Owens’ granddaughter, Marlene Dortch.

MORE: Michael Phelps, Katie Ledecky big winners at Team USA Awards

Simone Biles discusses her future

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 16:  Gold medalist Simone Biles of the United States celebrates on the podium at the medal ceremony for the Women's Floor on Day 11 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Rio Olympic Arena on August 16, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)
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Simone Biles does not know where she will be next October, when the 2017 World Championships will be held. Understandable, considering it is hard enough for her to keep track of where she will be tomorrow.

She has been living out of a suitcase, a very organized suitcase with pants on one side and tops on the other, since winning four Olympic gold medals in Rio. Her whirlwind travel schedule is full of media appearances, sponsor visits and a USA Gymnastics tour of shows. More than once she has woken up in a hotel, unsure which city she was in.

“Everything has happened so fast,” she said in a phone interview from the Team USA Awards red carpet in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. “But it’s definitely amazing.”

Biles, 19, reiterated that she plans on taking a break from competition for about a year.

“There’s no way I could train 100% and still do everything that I am doing now,” she said.

Biles is not ready to set a date for her return to competitive gymnastics. She is not planning on entering the 2017 P&G Championships, which will be held Aug. 17-20, almost exactly a year after the 2016 Olympics.

“Oh goodness, I think that still falls under a year,” she said. “We will see. I could always change my mind.”

The 2017 World Championships will be held next October in Montreal. None of the previous four U.S. Olympic women’s all-around champions competed at Worlds the year after their Olympic triumphs, but Biles has not ruled it out.

She was asked if she had thought about competing in Montreal.

“I have and I haven’t,” said Biles, the three-time defending world all-around champion. “I try not to think too far ahead.”

It remains to be seen who will coach her once she returns to training. Aimee Boorman, who coached Biles since she was 7, is moving from Texas for a new gymnastics job in Florida.

Biles “loves Florida” and “thinks the whole state is beautiful” based on her two visits to the Sunshine State. But she is not sure if she will follow her coach to Florida.

“Florida is quite a ways away, but anything can happen,” she said. “We will have to see whenever I decide to start up again.”

Biles was speaking on behalf DICK’s Sporting Goods, who pledged a $1,000 donation for every Olympic and Paralympic Games medal won by a U.S. athlete in Rio. By winning five Olympics medals, Biles was directly responsible for a $5,000 contribution.

There are six Olympic medals available for female artistic gymnastics. Biles did not compete in the uneven bars final in Rio, but that could change at the Tokyo Games.

“My bar just needs to be a little bit stronger,” she said. “We’ll have to see once I go back to training to up my difficulty if it’s possible for me to get a sixth.”

Until then, Biles is enjoying her celebrity status. Since Rio, she has met Beyoncé, Kim Kardashian and Usher, and even filmed a music video with Jake Miller.

“I have no idea when this whole process slows down,” Biles said. “That would be a question for the world, not me.”

MORE: Best photos from red carpet of the Team USA Awards