Did Aussie swimmers sleepwalk through London?

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Note to all the young swimmers out there: Don’t take sleeping pills before a big meet.

Led by James Magnussen, the Aussie men’s 4x100m freestyle relay team was the talk of London heading into the Olympics last summer. The squad was favored to finish first or second, but what happened in the pool was something nobody saw coming.

A fourth-place finish. No medal. And three days later, Magnussen lost a close 100m freestyle to American Nathan Adrian (Magnussen was the reigning world champ in the event).

Since then, stories about problems on the Aussie swim team have surfaced. Some have pointed fingers at the coaches and management, while others have put the blame squarely on the swimmers’ shoulders. At any rate, it seems like the Aussies were not a cohesive unit like the Americans were (remember this video?).

And now this: A story in the Sydney’s Daily Telegraph claims there may have been some illegal drug use amongst the team in the form of a sleeping pill called Stillnox. Which, by the way, was banned by the Australian Olympic Committee shortly before the team departed for London.

According to the article, the members of the 4x100m freestyle relay team made prank calls to teammates in the middle of the night and banged on hotel room doors. Rumors swirled of the junior members on the team taking Stillnox as a right of passage.

The swimmers were not allowed to drink alcohol but there was talk about some of them not being able to stand up and others who would slide to the floor while sitting on their beds.

Australia won 10 swimming medals in London – one gold, six silver and three bronze – which was ruled a disappointment by the nation’s sport ministers. A review is ongoing to determine why the medal count was so low.

There’s also an ongoing investigation looking into the claims of drug use. Magnussen would neither confirm nor deny the Stillnox rumors in an interview with Sky Sports Radio.

Call us crazy, but we think it would be best if swimmers steered clear of sleeping pills before the Olympics. Illegal or not.

The secret messages Lindsey Vonn wrote on her Olympic race suit

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SCHEDULE UPDATE: Vonn will will return for the final women’s downhill training run on Monday at 9 p.m. ET. LIVE STREAM

Look closely at Lindsey Vonn.

When NBC cameras zoom in on the two-time Olympic medalist, viewers will notice that she wrote a couple of messages on her uniform in permanent marker.

On the thumb of her right glove, Vonn has the word “believe” in Greek. It mirrors a tattoo she has on the inside of a finger.

“Signifying my last Olympics [in 2018] and just need to believe in myself,” Vonn said to NBC’s Nick Zaccardi.

On her helmet, Vonn has the initials “D.K.” and a heart. It is meant to honor her late grandfather, Don Kildow.

Kildow, who served in the Korean War from 1952-54, died on Nov. 1. Watch to learn more about Vonn’s special relationship with her grandparents:

Hard falls at Olympics, but no hard rules about concussions

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea (AP) — At the bottom of the Olympic aerials landing hill, where crashes are common and the term “slap back” is part of the everyday lingo, skiers spend almost as much time figuring out how to protect their heads as they do working on all those flips and spins.

“We learn how to fall,” U.S. jumper Jon Lillis said.

Elsewhere around the action-sports venue, that’s not so much the case.

Concussion dangers lurk everywhere — from the iced-over deck of the halfpipe, to the steeply pitched landings on the slopestyle course, to the careening twists and turns of the snowboard cross track, to the aerials course, where “slap back” is the term for when a skier’s head slaps backward against the snow. But at the Olympics, there are no hard-and-fast rules regarding who diagnoses head injuries, and no hard-and-fast protocol that athletes must clear to be allowed back on the slopes after a concussion.

“A bit concerning,” says neurologist Kevin Weber of the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. “Because you worry that athletes in other sports that may not be as popular as football are getting, I wouldn’t say ignored, but the concussions they’re getting are under-scrutinized.”

Read the full story at NBCOlympics.com