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Squash aiming for the 2020 Games

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We’re not yet sure where the Olympics will be held in 2020 (though we’re guessing Istanbul gets the nod), but it’s already time to start looking at which sports will make the cut when the Summer Games return, then leave, then return again eight years from now.

Seven events will be vying for a spot on the 2020 schedule, including baseball and softball in a co-bid, but Squash has been making a lot of noise in its aim for inclusion. World Squash Federation President Rami Ramachandrans told Inside the Games that they might have figured out the formula.

“One of the big things is the introduction of glass courts, which has made squash much more spectator friendly,” Ramachandrans said. “It is one of the things that has helped improved the presentation of the game along with other measures like using under floor lighting, music, referee video review…”

His idea seems to be that making the Squash cooler will ultimately get his sport in to the Games, which was far-fetched before the IOC began awarding medals in snowboarding and BMX. Now cool spectator sports are ideal for Olympics fans growing up in an X-Games world.

“Courts can be placed in amazing iconic locations – in front of pyramids, harbour side, in museums or anywhere else to really bring a host city to life,” Ramachandrans added. “It would also create a real squash sporting legacy for that host city.”

And so the WSF launched its “Back the Bid” campaign, a movement that saw flashmobs, Twitter campaigns, and more than 40,000 enthusiasts celebrating World Squash Day around the globe. Not nearly the same as the millions upon millions that most sports boast, but it’s a definitely start.

An added bonus is how much the Olympics love racket and country club sports, and Squash, which has been called “jet-propelled chess” (though only by people who play Squash), is both. All that said, visions of men and women hitting balls around glass cages might be something we should get used to.

The seven sports will present their cases to the IOC Executive Board early next year. Game on.

No Zika cases from Olympics, WHO says

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 12:  An aerial view of the Christ The Redeemer statue (F) and the Maracana Stadium (B) on November 12, 2013 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)
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There have been zero Zika virus cases stemming from the Rio Olympics, the World Health Organization said Thursday.

“From the reports WHO received from national health authorities, there have so far been no laboratory confirmed cases of Zika virus in anyone associated with the Olympics,” the organization said in an online update Thursday.

Earlier this summer, several athletes cited Zika concerns in skipping the Olympics.

The World Health Organization said before the Rio Games that the Olympics posed “a very low risk” of accelerating the Zika virus spread around the world.

Thousands of athletes will come to Rio for the Paralympics that run from Sept. 7-18, which is still during Brazil’s winter, lessening the Zika risk.

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Devon Allen weighs turning pro in track and field

Devon Allen
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University of Oregon hurdler and wide receiver Devon Allen said he “thinks” he’s turning pro in track, but also said he hasn’t really decided if his NCAA track career is finished Thursday.

“There’s not really much more I can do in college track other than break the collegiate record,” Allen said.

Allen, a University of Oregon junior, finished fifth in the Rio Olympic 110m hurdles on Aug. 16 after winning the Olympic Trials on July 9.

Allen can turn pro in track and field and still play football for the Ducks, so long as he keeps his track and field profits to prize money and not endorsement deals.

He’s definitely planning on playing for Oregon’s football team this season, perhaps even in the season opener Sept. 3.

As for track season next winter and spring, that’s looking unlikely. Allen noted that he has won NCAA individual and team titles.

The only missing piece is the NCAA record of 13.00 set by former world-record holder Renaldo Nehemiah. Allen’s personal best is 13.03.

It’s clear that Allen would like to be a professional in both track and football.

“The NFL is something I’ve been dreaming about doing, just like I dreamed about running in the Olympics,” said Allen, who caught nine passes for 94 yards last season, coming back from tearing knee ligaments in the Rose Bowl. “I kind of accomplished that Olympic dream, obviously, in four years, I want to win a gold medal, so that’s one more step to that dream. Now my next dream is to play in the NFL.”

VIDEO: Top track and field moments from Rio Olympics