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Chaos on the champions’ tour

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You may have heard a little something about all the gymnasts dropping like flies during the Kelloggs Tour of Champions recently. You’re also probably wondering “Why are they still touring?”

Well, here’s the low down:

The Post Olympic tour is a long-standing tradition and an important marketing tool for USA Gymnastics. After each Olympics the stars of the men’s and women’s gymnastics teams go from city-to-city all over the U.S. meeting fans, signing autographs, and putting on flashy choreographed dance performances mixed with gymnastics. Fun.

The tour has also often been a way for athletes who have gone pro to make a little money from their efforts in a sport that doesn’t offer the typical million dollar pay day of other mainstream sports. Most of these athletes have trained eight hours a day, six days a week, leading up the Games, so the tour is also a much needed mental break from the grind of Olympic preparation.

The Kelloggs Tour of Champions is a high-flying spectacle, but it also seems to be fielding an unfortunate trend of injuries. On the second of forty stops McKayla Maroney further injured her leg performing a simple fly away dismount on uneven bars, and had to undergo surgery. That same night Aly Raisman had a scary fall from the bars and sustained minor injuries to her knees and back. Then, just this week, John Orozco tore his ACL and meniscus, an injury that could end the national champ’s season before it even begins.

This is gymnastics and accidents happen, but what is going on with this tour!?

A few explanations:

Athletes are performing less difficult routines than they did in London, but instead of competing on a podium that adds extra bounce and cushion, the gymnasts are performing on thin mats placed over concrete, a surface they’re not used to landing on. Their personal coaches are back at home preparing future Olympians so tour members are without their normal safety net. Many athletes came into the tour a bit worn down, and beat up from the wear and tear of the Olympic games and thus injuries are more likely.

There’s certain to be at least two tour survivors: Danell Leyva chose to forgo the tour entirely to resume training and will head out on an international assignment in December. Kyla Ross performed only her home state is back training for 2016. Phew. Stay safe out there, everyone.

BuzzFeed scares Olympians with a live turkey

Buzzfeed Turkey
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In honor of Thanksgiving, our friends at BuzzFeed decided to surprise several Olympians with a live turkey.

Watch your favorite Olympians practice their turkey calls, and even take selfies with the bird:

Athletes featured in the video:

Tori Bowie (Track & Field)

Matt Centrowitz (Track & Field)

Dawn Harper-Nelson (Track & Field)

Jenny Simpson (Track & Field)

Katelin Snyder (Rowing)

MORE: NBC Olympics Thanksgiving Rio promo

Bobsled Olympic medalist Steve Langton retires

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 03:  (BROADCAST-OUT)  Steve Langton of the United States Bobsled team poses for a portrait ahead of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics on February 3, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
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Steve Langton, who was described by driver Steven Holcomb as the “best push athlete in the world,” announced his retirement today.

A collegiate sprinter and jumper at Northeastern University, Langton decided to try bobsledding after watching the 2006 Winter Olympics. He filled out an online athlete resume, and, by the 2010 Games, he was an Olympian.

At the Sochi 2014 Games, Langton teamed with Holcomb to win a bronze medal in the two-man race. It was the first Olympic medal in the event by American sled since 1952. He claimed another bronze medal as a member of Holcomb’s four-man “Night Train.”

“In Sochi I competed on the world’s biggest stage, I won two medals for my country and I did so along not only the best teammates but best friends anyone could ever ask for,” Langton told USA Bobsled.

Langton, who has a 62-inch standing box jump and can squat more than 500 pounds, was described by Men’s Health as “the most powerful winter Olympian” in the lead-up to 2014 Games.

“[Langton’s] work ethic and discipline rubbed off on the other athletes and made everyone better,” said USA Bobsled & Skeleton Chief Executive Officer Darrin Steele. “I have no doubt that he’ll find success in the next chapter of his life as well.”

Langton appeared on “The Amazing Race” in 2015 with his girlfriend, Aly Dudek, an Olympic short track speedskater.

None of the push athletes on the current U.S. roster have Olympic experience. Holcomb will compete in the World Cup opener this Saturday with Sam McGuffie, a former University of Michigan football player. The race will be McGuffie’s World Cup debut.