IOC to investigate Armstrong; Brits to burn effigy

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Lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles after a USADA investigation revealed he was part of the “most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen,” but it was believed Armstrong would keep his Sydney Olympic medal, if only on the technicality of an expired eight-year statute of limitations.

Now his 2000 time trial bronze is in jeopardy, too.

“USADA’s report has given some pointers that the statute of limitation was interrupted through Lance Armstrong lying about doping,” IOC lawyer Thomas Bach told Reuters. “We will have to examine to see if this is a way we can follow according to Swiss law.”

The IOC said it will begin an immediate investigation into Armstrong, the other riders, and particularly their entourages during the scandalous time window and determine what course of action to take next. The UCI will also begin an investigation regarding allegations made against its organization during the Armstrong era.

Armstrong, who  was mocked on Wednesday’s “South Park” when the town’s people were shown having yellow bracelets removed, stepped down from his post as chairman of the Livestrong organization, lost his sponsorships, and forfeited his fight against the allegations, but maintains he never doped.

Tough to argue with since he also never tested positive for banned substances, but the people of Edenbridge, England don’t seem to care: they’ll burn an effigy of the tarnished cyclist during an annual Nov. 5 commemoration of Guy Fawkes’ unsuccessful plot to blow up Parliament in 1605.

USOC expects to discuss possible Winter Olympic bid

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PARK CITY, Utah — USOC leaders are expected to discuss a possible Winter Olympic bid as early as next month.

The U.S. could bid for the 2026 or 2030 Winter Olympics. USOC CEO Scott Blackmun said it would be more difficult to bid for 2026 with the 2028 Summer Games set for Los Angeles.

Salt Lake City, Denver, Reno-Tahoe and other cities have expressed interest in bidding, Blackmun said Monday.

The USOC executive board meets Oct. 13. USOC chairman Larry Probst said they “need to talk about” a possible Winter Olympic bid and whether it could be for 2026 or 2030 or later down the line.

The USOC has focused on Summer Olympic bids since 2003. It was officially awarded the 2028 Olympics 12 days ago.

Blackmun added Monday that he hopes multiple U.S. cities could participate in the IOC’s invitational phase for possible bids over the next year. That phase is for cities to receive feedback before formally deciding to put forward a bid.

IOC members are expected to vote in 2019 to determine the 2026 Winter Olympic host.

Sion, Switzerland, is the only city to confirm bid plans.

Probst, an IOC member, also expects Innsbruck, Austria, to bid to become the first city to host the Winter Olympics three times. A public vote for a possible Innsbruck bid to move forward is scheduled for Oct. 15.

Calgary and Stockholm could also bid.

I think [IOC president] Thomas Bach has publicly stated that he would like to see the Winter Games return to a more traditional location,” Probst said. “So, to me, that’s code for Europe or North America. … We’ll have to monitor that, see what the situation looks like and then develop our strategy for whether we’re going to bid for the next Winter Games or longer than that.”

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MORE: Austria looks into multi-country 2026 Winter Olympic bid

USOC supports athletes expressing themselves after anthem protests

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PARK CITY, Utah — The U.S. Olympic Committee supports American athletes expressing themselves at winter sports events leading up to the PyeongChang Olympics.

Some MLB, NFL and WNBA players kneeled and remained in locker rooms during the national anthem at games over the weekend.

USOC CEO Scott Blackmun was asked Monday if the USOC would support American athletes peacefully protesting during the national anthem this fall and winter.

“I think the athletes that you see protesting are protesting because they love their country, not because they don’t,” Blackmun said at a pre-Winter Games media summit. “We fully support the right of our athletes and everybody else to express themselves. The Olympic Games themselves, there is a prohibition on all forms of demonstrations, political or otherwise. And that applies no matter what side of the issue you’re taking, no matter where you’re from. … But we certainly recognize the importance of athletes being able to express themselves.”

Blackmun mentioned Tommie Smith and John Carlos‘ raised-fist salute at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. The USOC has honored Smith and Carlos. They visited the White House last year with the Rio Olympic team.

“That was a seminal moment not only for the Olympic Movement, but for the U.S. Olympic team,” Blackmun said of the 1968 podium gesture. “Our stance on this has been fairly clear. We certainly recognize the rights of the athletes to express themselves.”

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