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NFL games in London’s Olympic Stadium?

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We can’t imagine the NFL placing a permanent resident in London anytime soon – although excommunicating Jacksonville to the other side of the Atlantic seems practical, if not appealing – but after another successful NFL showcase in London, the city’s mayor is looking to lock some American football games into Olympic Stadium.

“The mayor and his team have held a number of meetings with senior executives in the last few days to explore further opportunities involving the NFL and London,” read a statement from Boris Johnson’s office. “The talks were exploratory. We are at an early stage, but the signs are encouraging.”

English citizens were treated to a 45-7 drubbing by the New England Patriots over the hapless St. Louis Rams Sunday at Wembley Stadium, which has an exclusive deal with the NFL through 2016.

The quirky Johnson, who also serves as the head of the London Legacy Development Cooperation, would love to see NFL games added to the Olympic Stadium schedule come 2017. Some have floated the idea of a permanent NFL tenant in the eventual future, but even mentioning it seems premature at this point.

For now it seems English football will fill the void as West Ham remains the leading contender to take over the space when the stadium is reopened in 2014, following $467 million spent renovating the newly dubbed Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford.

However, good news! The two sides have agreed to add a second NFL game in London during the 2013 season, which the mayor’s office estimates will bring in an additional $71 million in revenue capital next year.

‘Olympic Pride, American Prejudice’ film on Berlin 1936 on the way

Jesse Owens
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“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,” a documentary on 18 African-American Olympians at the Berlin 1936 Games, is set to be screened in the spring and be narrated and executive produced by Blair Underwood, according to Variety.

The group of 18, headlined by Jesse Owens, competed in the face of Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler on the brink of World War II.

Trailers for the film are here and here.

From the film’s website:

“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice is a feature length documentary exploring the trials and triumphs of 18 African American Olympians in 1936. Set against the strained and turbulent atmosphere of a racially divided America, which was torn between boycotting Hitler’s Olympics or participating in the Third Reich’s grandest affair, the film follows 16 men and two women before, during and after their heroic turn at the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin. They represented a country that considered them second class citizens and competed in a country that rolled out the red carpet in spite of an undercurrent of Aryan superiority and anti-Semitism. They carried the weight of a race on their shoulders and did the unexpected with grace and dignity.

The athletes experienced things that they were not expecting—applause, warm welcomes, integrated Olympic villages and the respect of their competitors. They were world heroes yet returned home to a short-lived glory. This story is complicated. This story is triumphant but unheralded.”

MORE: See ‘Race’ film poster

Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims’ families detail massacre in documentary

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Family members of the Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims “described the extent of the cruelty” in interviews for “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” an upcoming documentary on the massacre, according to The New York Times.

Eleven Israeli athletes and officials were killed after being taken hostage by a Palestinian group in the athletes’ village nearly 40 years ago, with nine dying in a failed rescue attempt.

In 1992, widows of two of the victims learned details of how the athletes and officials were treated — including via graphic photographs — and recently spoke publicly about it, according to the newspaper.

“What they did is that they cut off his genitals through his underwear and abused him,” Ilana Romano said through a translator of husband Yossef Romano, an Olympic weightlifter, according to the newspaper. “Can you imagine the nine others sitting around tied up? They watched this.”

The documentary “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” announced earlier this year, is set to be released in early 2016. Here’s an interview with one of the film’s producers.

In 2014, it was announced that a $2.3 million memorial in Munich was planned to remember the victims, with the International Olympic Committee contributing $250,000.

At Rio 2016, a moment of remembrance will be held during the Closing Ceremony and a special mourning area will be in the Olympic village to honor those who have died during an Olympic Games.

PHOTOS: Munich 1972 Olympic sites, including massacre site