U.S. skeleton racer Pikus-Pace joins un-retirement club

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Why weren’t we shocked to hear that U.S. skeleton racer Noelle Pikus-Pace has emerged from retirement with the intention of making the 2014 Olympic team?

Because un-retiring seems to be the latest craze in Olympic circles.

There was American swimmer Brendan Hansen, who ended up winning a gold and a bronze in London. Other swimmers tried to qualify for the Olympics and failed, like Australian Ian Thorpe – who said he’s now gunning for meets in 2014 (and possibly 2016?)

Two notable U.S. gymnasts – Shawn Johnson and Nastia Liukin – fell short of making the London team after un-retiring.

And now we have Pikus-Pace, who finished fourth at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver. She won world championship gold in 2007 and silver in 2005, the latter of which made her a favorite at the 2006 Olympics. But an unfortunate accident involving an out-of-control bobsled at the track in Calgary resulted in a broken leg and a missed trip to Torino.

Pikus-Pace said she was done competing in Vancouver. Now the 29-year-old is dead-set on having a successful World Cup season with the Sochi Olympics looming a little more than a year away.

But there is one catch: Pikus-Pace is not yet eligible to compete in any World Cup races; she must first compete in four races on two tracks before she’s allowed to join the tour. She’ll meet the requirement soon once she races in Park City, Utah and Calgary.

“I didn’t know what to expect going into this season because it’s been so long since I’ve competed,” Pikus-Pace told the Associated Press. “Once I got on the sled for the first time in Lake Placid a couple weeks ago it all clicked again. I knew then it was going to be a good season, and it’s actually starting out to be a great season.”

U.S. senators speak up as women’s hockey worlds near with no resolution

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Sixteen U.S. senators wrote a letter to USA Hockey’s executive director Monday over their concerns about the treatment of the women’s national team.

Players have threatened to boycott the upcoming world championships over a wage dispute. The senators, all Democrats, urged David Ogrean to resolve the matter and ensure the team receives “equitable resources.” They cited the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act.

USA Hockey’s board of directors meets Monday, and players said Sunday night they hope there’s a deal.

The senators, all Democrats, joined a chorus of support that includes unions representing players from the NHL, NBA, NFL and Major League Baseball. Those organizations said over the weekend they stood with the women’s team and criticized USA Hockey for attempting to find replacement players.

Prominent NHL agent Allan Walsh tweeted Sunday, “Word circulating among NHL players that American players will refuse to play in men’s World Championships in solidarity with the women.”

Zach Bogosian, an American-born Buffalo Sabres defenseman, went to high school with U.S. captain Meghan Duggan. He tweeted his support and said he hopes the dispute is resolved.

The U.S. is the defending champion at the International Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship, which begins Friday in Plymouth, Michigan.

In negotiations over the past 15 months, players have asked for a four-year contract that pays them outside the six-month Olympic period. The senators’ letter notes the $6,000 that players earn around the Olympics and USA Hockey’s $3.5 million annual spending on the men’s national team development program and other discrepancies.

“These elite athletes indeed deserve fairness and respect, and we hope you will be a leader on this issue as women continue to push for equality in athletics,” the senators wrote.

In a statement Sunday night, players said they hoped USA Hockey would approve terms discussed during a meeting last week. They said the agreement has the “potential to be a game changer for everyone.”

The letter was signed by: Elizabeth Warren and Edward Markey of Massachusetts, Patty Murray of Washington, Dianne Feinstein of California, Patrick Leahy of Vermont, Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Thomas Carper of Delaware, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, Robert Menendez and Cory Booker of New Jersey, Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota.

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Ugandan Olympian’s body shuts down at World Cross-Country Champs (video)

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Ugandan Joshua Cheptegei went from leading the race to finishing 30th in the final kilometer at the World Cross-Country Championships in Kampala, Uganda, on Sunday.

Cheptegei, a 20-year-old Olympian, saw his body shut down in the last four minutes of his race.

His stride shortened. His pace slowed. Cheptegei appeared on the verge of falling. At one point, a teammate deliberately pushed him from behind to keep going.

Cheptegei led by 12 seconds going into the final two-kilometer lap. He would finish 1 minute, 44 seconds behind Kenyan winner Geoffrey Kamworor, with 28 other runners separating them after the 10km race that took about a half-hour.

Cheptegei’s body movement looked similar to that of British triathlete Jonny Brownlee, who had to be helped to the finish line by brother Alistair Brownlee at the World Triathlon Series Grand Final in Cozumel, Mexico, in September.

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