Lolo Jones

Lolo picked for bobsled World Cup team

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American hurdler Lolo Jones may have become a bobsledder last month when she was one of six push athletes chosen by U.S. coach Todd Hayes for the national team, but that didn’t guarantee her anything but a news cycle and a pat on the back.

On Sunday they made it official.

Jones earned her spot on the sport’s top circuit over the weekend when the USBSF calculated the final race-off data of the six chosen push athletes. She’ll back pilot Jazmine Fenlator in USA-3 during Friday’s women’s World Cup opener in Lake Placid, N.Y.

Continuing the experiment, Hays picked two other track athletes who happen to be bobsled rookies: London 4x100m gold medal sprinter Tianna Madison will push pilot Elana Meyers in USA-1 and University of Illinois shotput and sprint standout Aja Evans will push Jamie Greubel in USA-2.

The USBSF is expected to release the full roster Monday, including men’s and women’s pairings, and while the public excitement will favor Jones, who has been in the spotlight as a talented and attractive 100m hurdler since before the 2008 Beijing Games, it’s Evans who the coach seems most confident in.

“Her upside is tremendous,” Hays, a 2002 Olympic silver medalist, told the Chicago Tribune last month. “By this time next year, Aja will set an entirely new standard for women’s bobsled.”

Still, on the ice as on the track, we expect all eyes to be on Lolo.

‘Olympic Pride, American Prejudice’ film on Berlin 1936 on the way

Jesse Owens
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“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,” a documentary on 18 African-American Olympians at the Berlin 1936 Games, is set to be screened in the spring and be narrated and executive produced by Blair Underwood, according to Variety.

The group of 18, headlined by Jesse Owens, competed in the face of Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler on the brink of World War II.

Trailers for the film are here and here.

From the film’s website:

“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice is a feature length documentary exploring the trials and triumphs of 18 African American Olympians in 1936. Set against the strained and turbulent atmosphere of a racially divided America, which was torn between boycotting Hitler’s Olympics or participating in the Third Reich’s grandest affair, the film follows 16 men and two women before, during and after their heroic turn at the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin. They represented a country that considered them second class citizens and competed in a country that rolled out the red carpet in spite of an undercurrent of Aryan superiority and anti-Semitism. They carried the weight of a race on their shoulders and did the unexpected with grace and dignity.

The athletes experienced things that they were not expecting—applause, warm welcomes, integrated Olympic villages and the respect of their competitors. They were world heroes yet returned home to a short-lived glory. This story is complicated. This story is triumphant but unheralded.”

MORE: See ‘Race’ film poster

Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims’ families detail massacre in documentary

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Family members of the Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims “described the extent of the cruelty” in interviews for “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” an upcoming documentary on the massacre, according to The New York Times.

Eleven Israeli athletes and officials were killed after being taken hostage by a Palestinian group in the athletes’ village nearly 40 years ago, with nine dying in a failed rescue attempt.

In 1992, widows of two of the victims learned details of how the athletes and officials were treated — including via graphic photographs — and recently spoke publicly about it, according to the newspaper.

“What they did is that they cut off his genitals through his underwear and abused him,” Ilana Romano said through a translator of husband Yossef Romano, an Olympic weightlifter, according to the newspaper. “Can you imagine the nine others sitting around tied up? They watched this.”

The documentary “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” announced earlier this year, is set to be released in early 2016. Here’s an interview with one of the film’s producers.

In 2014, it was announced that a $2.3 million memorial in Munich was planned to remember the victims, with the International Olympic Committee contributing $250,000.

At Rio 2016, a moment of remembrance will be held during the Closing Ceremony and a special mourning area will be in the Olympic village to honor those who have died during an Olympic Games.

PHOTOS: Munich 1972 Olympic sites, including massacre site