Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports

Does anyone care about Olympic tennis?

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The pristine lawns of Wimbledon. A dominating Serena Williams. Britain’s first home-grown champion in more than 70 years. In 2012, it seemed tennis was truly embraced at the Olympics.

Or, was it?

In the months since the closing of the 2012 Games, some of the game’s top players have committed themselves to Rio in 2016: Serena has set her eyes on trying to repeat in South America, as do the men’s doubles gold medalists, Americans Bob and Mike Bryan, and Rafael Nadal, who was forced to pull out London because of injury, wants badly to reclaim the singles gold he won in Beijing.

But there’s part of the sporting world that thinks tennis should keep to their own “Olympic” events – the Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open – and stay away from the actual Games.

“Tennis shouldn’t be a part of the Olympics,” says two-time U.S. Open champ Patrick Rafter. “We have our four gold medal events every year in the Slams. For us, winning a Grand Slam is like winning a gold medal for a swimmer. But they only get to do it once every four years. We get to do it four times a year.”

Rafter’s response is perhaps a generational one. Tennis players use to view the Olympics as just another tournament. Olympic draws have a smaller field (64 players) compared to the four majors (128 players).

But Andre Agassi, who won gold at Atlanta in 1996, thinks tennis will only become more a part of the Olympic experience in 2016.

“I think Wimbledon helped a great deal and we have a great platform now to catapult into Rio,” Agassi says. “The guys are taking it much more seriously… it seems like everyone tries to peak for it, which I think is great for the sport.”

Indeed, the Olympics has become a focal point for many tennis schedule makers – and as a career marker for those like Serena and Nadal.

For Pete Sampras, a 14-time Grand Slam champion, tennis only found a place in the Games this year because of Wimbledon playing host.

“The reason tennis was unique at the Olympics this year was because it was at Wimbledon,” Sampras insists. “In Rio, I’m telling you, it won’t be like it was this year. It’s not at the [All England] Club, so it won’t have the same feel.”

Sampras played in the Olympics just once, losing in the third round at the Barcelona Games in 1992.

“Tennis at the Olympics—when I was growing up—was an exhibition sport. For me, it wasn’t that big of a deal to play the Olympics as a tennis player. It’s just another tournament. That’s my humble opinion.”

But Sampras doesn’t agree with Rafter’s point that tennis shouldn’t be a part of the games whatsoever.

“I wouldn’t go that far, but I understand what [Rafter’s] saying. I just think it is what it is. When it comes to Rio, I just don’t think it will measure up to 2012.”

Lindsey Vonn’s winning streak snapped

Lindsey Vonn
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For the first time in 13 World Cup speed races, Lindsey Vonn crossed the finish line and saw a number other than “1” next to her name.

Vonn was beaten by Swiss Lara Gut and German Viktoria Rebensburg in a World Cup super-G in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, on Sunday. Lower-ranked skiers were still to race.

Gut was .15 faster than Rebensburg and .23 better than Vonn, who would break Renate Götschl‘s record with her 42nd World Cup super-G podium if the places hold. Full results are here.

Vonn had a clear error near the end of the course, losing balance and lifting her right ski off the snow, but she was already behind Gut in the two most recent split times. The mistake may have cost Vonn second place, though.

Gut earned the provisional victory, one day after she was a disappointing 14th in a downhill won by Vonn.

Vonn had won 11 of her previous 12 World Cup downhill or super-G starts, including five straight super-Gs. In the only non-victory in that stretch, she skied off course and recorded a DNF in a downhill.

On Sunday, Gut cut into Vonn’s standings lead for the World Cup overall title, the sport’s biggest prize this season with no Olympics or World Championships. Vonn now provisionally leads Gut by 87 points through 25 of a scheduled 41 races.

Vonn remains on 76 World Cup victories, 10 shy of retired Swede Ingemar Stenmark‘s record.

The World Cup resumes with a downhill in Crans-Montana, Switzerland, on Saturday.

MORE: American podiums in first race on 2018 Olympic course

Chloe Kim lands back-to-back 1080s, scores perfect 100 (video)

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Chloe Kim notched arguably the most impressive feat of her young snowboarding career, becoming the first woman to land back-to-back 1080s and scoring a perfect 100 at the U.S. Grand Prix in Park City, Utah, on Saturday.

Kim, 15 and the two-time reigning Winter X Games champion, may have become the second rider to ever score 100 in a top-level halfpipe contest.

When Shaun White scored the first 100 in X Games history in 2012, “it was the first perfect score and perfect run ever seen in a halfpipe contest,” according to the Denver Post. In that run, White reportedly became the first rider to land back-to-back double cork 1260s.

Nobody has scored 100 in an X Games or the Olympics since. The 100-point scoring system was first used at the Olympics in 2014.

Like White, Kim’s perfect run came on a “victory lap,” after she had already clinched the win in an earlier run.

After Kim finished her run, three-time Olympic medalist Kelly Clark raised Kim’s left arm. When the 100-point score came up, Clark receded and allowed Kim to soak in the moment.

Clark, who is 17 years older than Kim, became the first woman to land a 1080 in 2011.

Kim, who was too young for the Sochi 2014 Olympics, is slated to compete in the Youth Olympic Games in Lillehammer, Norway, later this month.

MORE: Shaun White misses X Games, plans another competition