U.S. marathoners to face tougher standards for 2016 Trials

Leave a comment

USATF is setting tougher standards for the 2016 Olympic marathon qualifier to “raise the bar”  and make the U.S. more competitive going forward.

The men will see the qualifying time drop only by a minute, from 2:19 in 2012 to 2:18 for the Rio Games. However, the women will have to increase their pace over the 26.2 miles course by a full three minutes after seeing their time drop from 2:46 to 2:43.

USATF is also bringing back the A and B qualifying classes for men after abandoning them in 2012.

To earn an A standard and have their expenses for Trials covered by USATF, the boys will need to finish under 2:15. For women, the A standard has been lowered slightly to 2:37, down from 2:39 for the London Olympics.

“The main thing in revising the standards is to continue to raise the bar,” Jim Estes, director of events for USATF, told Runners World Newswire. “That seems to have worked if you look at 2012 compared to 2008 – the numbers were higher, both overall and as far as the number of A qualifiers.”

Hopefully more difficult standards will improve Team USA’s chances of bringing home its first marathon gold since Joan Benoit in 1984, or at the very least keep our runners on the course for the entire race.

More of best GIFs from PyeongChang Olympics

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The 2018 Winter Games are over, but that doesn’t mean we’ll forget all the amazing heights reached by American athletes. Take a look back at a few of them here with an added twist, powered by Giphy:

18 most dominant athletes from the 2018 Olympics

Getty Images
Leave a comment

My 18 most dominant gold medalists at the Olympics, choosing at least one from each sport. 

1. Ester Ledecka, Czech Republic, Alpine Skiing/Snowboarding
Arguably the greatest athlete on the planet after taking surprise gold in Alpine skiing’s super-G and snowboarding’s parallel giant slalom (where she was the clear favorite). The 22-year-old became the third athlete to win individual Winter Olympic gold medals in different sports, the first since 1932 and the first woman. The other two were done in cross-country skiing and Nordic combined, the latter being a mixture of ski jumping and cross-country skiing. Ledecka’s feat was certainly more impressive.

2. Marit Bjørgen, Norway, Cross-Country Skiing
The most decorated athlete at the Games with five medals, including two golds. Bigger, though, is that the 37-year-old mom broke countryman Ole Einar Bjørndalen’s record for career Winter Olympic medals, finishing with 15. She also tied Bjørndalen and Bjørn Dæhlie’s record of eight Winter Olympic titles by winning the last event of the Games, the 30km, by 109 seconds, the largest Olympic cross-country margin of victory in 38 years. In her final career Olympic race.

3. Yun Sung-Bin, South Korea, Skeleton
Under host-nation pressure, the man in the Iron Man helmet had the fastest run in each of the four heats and won by 1.63 seconds, the largest margin in Olympic skeleton history.

Read the rest of the story by clicking here