Natalie Coughlin: Professional swimmer, amateur gorilla-watcher

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Fresh off her history-making performance in London that saw her tie Dara Torres’ and Jenny Thompson’s all-time Olympic medals total of 12 (the most for a U.S. female), Natalie Coughlin wants to keep swimming at age 30.

We caught up with Coughlin and talked about working out, her recent trip to Africa – where she proudly wore her Oakland Raiders hat in the jungle – and a whole lot more. Here’s a condensed version of our conversation:

How much swimming and training are you doing?
I’ve been lifting, running and swimming. I haven’t formally started training with the team yet, but I have been working out on my own. I’m swimming five days a week … not over 5,000 [meters a day].

When will you start competing again?
I have no idea. I’m still trying to figure out my meet schedule. But I’ll definitely be at Santa Clara [Grand Prix in early June] and World Championships Trials [in late June].

You do a lot of running. Ever think of going the Brendan Hansen route and doing triathlons?
The whole cycling thing freaks me out. Being on the road with cars … when I’m in my own car I don’t trust other drivers. If there were run-swims, I would do those.
Editor’s note: Natalie, try an aquathlon.

Did it really take you 45 hours to travel to Rwanda for your recent trip with Right to Play?
We ended up having mechanical issues in Chicago that ruined the rest of our flight. We flew from San Francisco to Chicago, then Chicago to Brussels. And originally we were supposed to fly from Brussels to Kigali [Rwanda] but because we missed that connection, and that connection only happens twice a week, we couldn’t get a flight. So we ended up having this 10-hour layover in Brussels, and then we flew Brussels to Paris, Paris to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and then Entebbe, Uganda to Rwanda.

We missed the first day of only a five-day trip. The day we landed, two hours later we had a press conference. Whenever I wasn’t speaking I was dozing off in front of all these reporters. I was at the point of absolute exhaustion.

Tell us about the gorillas you saw in Rwanda.
I will admit, there were times when I accepted that I might get completely mauled by gorillas. [laughs] A toddler gorilla kicked me and ran off. The alpha silverback came to me and brushed up against me. I was trying to look at the ground, look anywhere but in his eyes.

What else stood out during the trip?
I had my big camera and I’m taking all these photos of the kids. Everywhere we went, they were so excited to see us. They were signing and dancing and including us in all the Right to Play games. The kids … would ask me to take pictures of them so they could see their photos. It was because they don’t have mirrors; they don’t know what they look like.

If you retired tomorrow, would you be satisfied?
I don’t think I can ever be satisfied with my career, but I’m extremely proud of it. I’m proud of what I’ve done. But half the reason that I’m continuing is that I still have goals for myself. That being said, if this all gets taken away from me somehow I will continually be proud of it and I’ll be OK with moving on. I love doing this, so why not?

Right to Play is an international organization dedicated to using sport and play to empower children and youth to overcome the effects of poverty, conflict, and disease in disadvantaged communities. Read more at righttoplay.com.

Kristi Yamaguchi tells Nancy Kerrigan to ‘break a leg’ on ‘Dancing with the Stars’

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Kristi Yamaguchi told Nancy Kerrigan to “break a leg” on her “Dancing with the Stars” debut in an innocent good-luck tweet between friends that generated plenty of reaction.

“So excited for you @NancyAKerrigan ! Can’t wait to see you grace that ballroom floor, break a leg! #DWTS,” was posted on Yamaguchi’s account Monday morning.

It generated more than 6,000 likes, 3,000 retweets and 1,000 replies, many referencing the horrible attack on Kerrigan before the 1994 U.S. Championships (where Kerrigan’s knee was bruised, but not broken).

Yamaguchi’s spokeswoman says in a statement that “Kristi loves Nancy” and “no ill will was intended,” according to The Associated Press.

The tweet conjured memories of T-shirts sold leading up to the 1994 Lillehammer Olympics with the words “Harding-Kerrigan” on the front and “Norway ’94, Break a Leg!!!” on the back, reported by major media 23 years ago.

Yamaguchi and Kerrigan shared world championships and Olympic podiums in 1991 and 1992 (Yamaguchi winning both times; Kerrigan with bronze).

They remain friends. Kerrigan said she spoke with Yamaguchi, a past “Dancing with the Stars” winner, about the experience, according to TeamUSA.org.

“I said to Kristi, ‘You’ve seen me at shows, Kris, how demanding is it?’” Kerrigan said, according to the report. “She said it’s very demanding, but you have to do it. She’s like, ‘You’ve been through worse, you have to do it, it’s such a great experience.’”

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VIDEO: Nancy Kerrigan’s first ‘Dancing with the Stars’ waltz

World Figure Skating Championships broadcast schedule

Ashley Wagner, Nathan Chen
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NBC Sports will air coverage of every event at the World Figure Skating Championships starting Wednesday in Helsinki, Finland.

The U.S. could have its best world team in more than a decade, led by 17-year-old phenom Nathan Chen, 2016 World silver medalist Ashley Wagner and the past two world silver medalists in ice dance.

Results in Helsinki are key, given they determine how many entries each nation gets for the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics.

Entries | Daily Schedule

Chen, the youngest U.S. champion in 51 years, has the highest total score in the world this season, achieved at the most recent top-level event, February’s Four Continents Championships at the 2018 Olympic venue in South Korea.

He’s a threat to become the first U.S. men’s medalist since Evan Lysacek took gold in 2009. The field is perhaps the deepest of all time, featuring Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan, two-time reigning world champion Javier Fernandez of Spain and three-time world champion Patrick Chan of Canada.

Wagner’s goal is to make the podium against a women’s field that includes Russian Yevgenia Medvedeva, trying to become the first woman to repeat as world champion since Michelle Kwan in 2001.

In ice dance, 2010 Olympic champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada are the favorites in their first worlds appearance since 2013. Two U.S. couples, Maia and Alex Shibutani and Madison Chock and Evan Bates, finished second and third at worlds last season and are again medal contenders in Helsinki.

In pairs, Canada has the two-time reigning world champions in Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford, but they were beaten at their last two international events. Alexa Scimeca Knierim and Christopher Knierim hope to become the first U.S. pair to finish in the top six since 2011.

All broadcast coverage on NBC and NBCSN will stream on NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app.

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MORE: Scimeca Knierim details life-threatening condition

Date Time (ET) Program Network
Wednesday, March 29 4:40 a.m. Women’s Short Icenetwork.com*
12 p.m. Women’s Short NBCSN, Streaming
2 p.m. Pairs Short NBCSN, Streaming
Thursday, March 30 6:10 a.m. Men’s Short Icenetwork.com*
11 a.m. Men’s Short NBCSN, Streaming
1 p.m. Pairs Free NBCSN, Streaming
Friday, March 31 5 a.m. Short Dance Icenetwork.com*
1 p.m. Women’s Free NBCSN, Streaming
8 p.m. Short Dance NBCSN, Streaming
Saturday, April 1 4:50 a.m. Men’s Free Icenetwork.com*
10:35 a.m. Free Dance Icenetwork.com*
12:30 p.m. Men’s Free NBCSN, Streaming
2:30 p.m. Free Dance NBCSN, Streaming
8 p.m. Women’s Free NBC, Streaming
Sunday, April 2 2 p.m. Exhibition Gala NBCSN, Streaming
Sunday, April 9 3 p.m. Recap NBC, Streaming

*For Icenetwork.com subscribers.