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Seven sports vie for 2020 Games

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Regardless of the fact that the IOC has three more Olympics to worry about this decade, the 2020 Olympics seem to be shaping up rather nicely.

Leaders from seven sports were in Lausanne, Switzerland this week to officially make their case for inclusion at a yet to be determined location as part of the 2020 Games.

But, unfortunately, there’s only one available spot in Tokyo, or Istanbul… or possibly Madrid. Here’s a look at each sport’s chances:

Squash: Surprisingly high. A possible frontrunner after the WSF made a concerted effort to popularize the sport, make it more modern, audience friendly, and fun. The glass-encased courts make for an incredible spectator experience, and you can put a camera anywhere, but it might lose out because of how many racquet sports are already in the Games.

Baseball/softball: High-ish. Both were taken off the Olympic schedule after Beijing, and both have failed to gain re-admittance for Rio, so we’re not sure joining forces suddenly makes this bid an automatic home run (pun totally intended). But they’re both popular sports that everyone knows, and can’t be counted out.

Roller sports: In consideration. It might be the dark-horse favorite if only because Olympics fans are familiar with its winter cousins. Roller sports includes six disciplines ranging from speed skating and roller figure skating to rink hockey and roller derby. Yes, that’s right, Olympic roller derby. That’s reason enough.

Wake boarding: Talking ourselves into it. A few years ago we’d say wake boarding was too X-Gamesy for the Olympics, but with guys like Shaun White regularly bringing medals back to the States, the audiences from both sporting events seem to be merging. It’s also great on television, though not for live spectators.

Wushu: Hmmmm. Earns points for combining all the best from other martial arts, and for literally being the chinese word for “martial arts.” But wushu loses points because few people have heard of it, and because it’s going up against the more well-known Karate, despite being more entertaining. Speaking of which…

Karate: Meh. We already have taekwondo and judo, so all Karate is bringing to the table is a different scoring system. Think the All-Valley Tournament at the end of The Karate Kid (but without the evil gang of teenagers). It already lost out for Rio and we’re just not sure its different enough to stand out.

Sport climbing: Low. Awesome sport, terrible spectator experience. It’s just difficult to televise athletes literally up against a wall. That said, if you sent some American Gladiators to chase them after ten seconds or so, we’d absolutely be into it. Otherwise, this one is probably near the bottom of the list.

Nick Symmonds auctions body ad space for double 2012 amount

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U.S. 800m runner Nick Symmonds‘ right shoulder is apparently twice as valuable as his left shoulder.

The two-time Olympian auctioned ad space on his body for a second straight Olympic summer, with the final bid at $21,800 for nine square inches on his right shoulder in an Ebay auction that ended Thursday afternoon.

T-Mobile CEO John Legere‘s Twitter account claimed the winning bid of 107 overall bids.

In 2012, Symmonds auctioned the same nine inches on his left shoulder for $11,100 to Hanson Dodge Creative, a marketing agency based in Milwaukee. Here’s what that temporary tattoo looked like.

Symmonds’ temporary tattoo was not visible during the 2012 Olympics or 2012 Olympic Trials, as rules mandate the advertisement is taped over in those events plus other IAAF competitions.

Symmonds, 32, finished fifth at the 2012 Olympics and second at the 2013 World Championships.

He was left off the 2015 World Championships roster, after winning the national title, after refusing to sign a USA Track and Field contract that required athletes to wear Nike-branded Team USA gear at team functions at Worlds.

Symmonds’ apparel sponsor has been Brooks since January 2014. He was previously a Nike-sponsored Oregon Track Club member for seven years.

MORE: Mother, son set to compete in same Olympics for first time

Karch Kiraly to remain U.S. women’s volleyball coach through 2020

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Karch Kiraly will continue as U.S. women’s volleyball team head coach through the 2020 Olympics, agreeing to a four-year contract renewal.

“It’s been a tremendous honor to lead this special group of intelligent, powerful, hard-working, dedicated women, and the great staff that supports them — and it’s a double honor to prepare for battle at the Rio Olympics, knowing we’ll have the opportunity to carry that work forward in the next quadrennial,” Kiraly said in a press release.

Kiraly, the only U.S. volleyball player to earn indoor and beach Olympic titles, took over after serving on Hugh McCutcheon‘s staff from 2009 through the 2012 Olympics, where the U.S. women took silver behind Brazil.

Kiraly then led the U.S. women to their first World or Olympic title in 2014. They are ranked No. 1 in the world ahead of China and Brazil.

The program has gone 50 years with zero Olympic golds and broke a 62-year World Championship drought in 2014.

Kiraly, 55, is set to become the first coach of multiple U.S. Olympic women’s volleyball teams since Terry Liskevych from 1988 through 1996.

MORE: U.S. women’s volleyball team inspired by tennis legend