Year in Review: Shin A-Lam triumphs in protest, victory

Leave a comment

OlympicTalk’s writers recount some of their favorite moments from the 2012 London Games. 

One of the most triumphant series of events during the London Games began as one of the most controversial – and most awkward.

It started with South Korean fencer Shin A-Lam sitting on the fencing strip, sobbing uncontrollably after she lost a semifinal epee bout that would have advanced her to the gold-medal match.

Moments earlier Shin held priority – a tiebreak – over Germany’s Britta Heidermann when the clock was stopped at 0:01 in overtime. Neither woman had scored in extra session, but because Shin earned the final point during regulation, by rule she would win if the score remained when the clock ran out.

The match recommenced and both women scored simultaneous; offsetting touches. Play stopped but the clock remained at :01. The bout was restarted and again both women immediately scored simultaneous touches. The clock stayed at :01.

“We’re talking fractions of a second here – has the clock even started?” the TV announcer wondered aloud.

Play was started a third time, Heidermann landed a quick touch and the final second on the clock ran off.

Incredulous that the clock had not moved at all during the two previous actions, Shin’s coach immediately argued with the judges. After 25 minutes of deliberation, the judges awarded the bout to Heidermann.

That’s when the real drama began: Shin refused to leave the piste, the elevated platform where fencers fight, because, by rule, a fencer who leaves the piste accepts the judges’ ruling on a bout.

So Shin stayed. And stayed.

For nearly 70 minutes Shin sat alone on the piste, sobbing, the uncomfortable drama all the more intense for its surroundings: All that was illuminated in the darkened ExCel arena was the piste itself – luminously brilliant in white, red and green – and Shin, still in her crisp white jacket.

Eventually the judges denied a formal appeal from her coach, and Shin was forced to leave. After losing the bronze-medal match, Shin was offered a consolation medal from fencing’s governing body.

She didn’t think much of the offer.

“It does not make me feel better because it’s not an Olympic medal,” she told the Guardian. “I don’t accept the result because I believe it was a mistake.”

Robbed, as she saw it, of an individual medal and disdainful of a sympathy medal, Shin refused to leave London empty handed.

She didn’t. Five days later she and her South Korean teammates stormed to a silver medal triumph in the women’s team epee competition.

“I am really happy now,” she told the Associated Press. “My teammates and people back in [South] Korea gave me wonderful support this week.”

Ligety exits quietly, Hirscher brilliant again

Getty Images
Leave a comment

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — Marcel Hirscher, the Austrian ski god, is finally having his moment. King of the World Cup tour for the past seven seasons, on Sunday Hirscher won his second Olympic gold, in the giant slalom.

Hirscher had won a grand total of no Olympic medals, nada, zip, zero in two prior Games. Now he might — could, should — win three here at PyeongChang. The slalom, another Hirscher specialty, is due to be run Thursday.

To watch Hirscher ski is to watch one of the great athletes of our — or any — time. Like being courtside in Chicago to see Michael Jordan back in the day. At Wimbledon for a Roger Federer volley. At the Water Cube in Beijing in 2008 when Michael Phelps was swimming the butterfly.

In Sunday’s race, Kristoffersen finished second, 1.27 seconds back of Hirscher. Pinturault finished third, 1.31 behind.

American racer Ted Ligety used to own this event: the Sochi 2014 giant slalom gold medalist, he was world champion in 2011, 2013 and 2015. Pinturault took Sochi 2014 bronze.

Considering his relatively low slalom ranking and the pounding that slalom demands, Sunday’s GS was — just like that, that quickly, that quietly — likely the final race of Ligety’s outstanding Olympic career.

“This is probably it for me at these Games,” he said after run two, adding that he is planning to head back to Europe, to race the remainder of the World Cup season.

Click here to continue reading the full story

Olympic ice dance figure skating preview

AP Images
Leave a comment

While Canada’s Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir already have a gold medal in PyeongChang from the team event, they’re back to regain their 2010 Olympic ice dance title.

The short dance is Sunday, February 18 in Primetime on NBC and NBCOlympics.com and the free dance is Monday, February 19 in Primetime on NBC and NBCOlympics.com.

Here are some names to know before the event kicks off:

Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue, Team USA

Credentials: Reigning U.S. national champions, first Olympic appearance is 2018

Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani, Team USA

Credentials: Three-time Worlds medalists, two-time U.S. national champions, 2014 Olympians, 2017 Grand Prix Final bronze medalists

Madison Chock and Evan Bates, Team USA
Buzz about Chock and Bates: They’re a couple on and off the ice, and say that’s given a new perspective to their athletic careers. They weren’t a couple when they competed together at the 2014 Olympics, so they believe this experience will be all the more special for it.

Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, Canada
Credentials: 2010 Olympic champions, two-time Sochi 2014 silver medalists, three-time world champions, eight-time Canadian national champions.

Read the full ice dance preview here and watch figure skating highlights and streams