Lindsey Vonn undergoes successful knee surgery

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U.S. Ski and Snowboard’s Tom Kelly tells NBC that Olympic gold medalist Lindsey Vonn is resting comfortably back in the U.S. after undergoing surgery to repair a torn ACL and MCL and a fractured lateral tibial plateau, which were all suffered during an accident in Austria last Tuesday.

Dr. Bill Sterett, the head physician for the U.S. women’s Alpine Ski Team, said it was too early to make a specific prognosis on her recovery. But added that “modern surgical techniques combined with aggressive rehabilitation will help Lindsey make a full recovery. She will do everything in her power to return as quickly as possible to competitive skiing.”

The four time world cup champion crashed after a hard landing in the super-G world championship during “extreme” weather conditions that delayed the race for more than three hours. She was treated on the mountain for more then ten minutes, then airlifted to a nearby hospital for evaluation.

Pictured here prior to Sunday’s surgery, Vonn’s agent said that the skier “is excited to be back in the US. She’s both humbled and motivated by the tremendous amount of support she’s been receiving from everyone.”

Vonn expects to recover in time for the World Cup season next fall, and for the winter Olympics next February in Sochi Russia, where she’ll look to defend her downhill gold medal from Vancouver. That wouldn’t be uncommon. Picabo Street returned from reconstructive surgery to win an Olympic gold medal in 1998 at Nagano, Japan.

Is curling the antidote to the world’s issues?

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GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — The world, some fret, is falling apart. Politicians spar viciously on social media. Leaders lie. Former heroes fall like dominoes amid endless scandals. Cruelty has come to feel commonplace.

But never fear: We have curling.

The sport with the frenzied sweeping and clacking rocks has rules that literally require players to treat opponents with kindness. Referees aren’t needed, because curlers police themselves. And the winners generally buy the losers a beer.

At the Pyeongchang Olympics, curlers and their fans agree: In an era of vitriol and venom, curling may be the perfect antidote to our troubled times.

“Nobody gets hit — other than the rock,” laughed Evelyne Martens of Calgary, Canada, as she watched a recent Canada vs. Norway curling match. “And there’s nothing about Trump here!”

Read the rest of the story at NBCOlympics.com

U.S. boblsedders remembering Steve Holcomb

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea (AP) — The memories are impossible to ignore. Justin Olsen sees him in the start house. Elana Meyers Taylor hears him on her track walks. Mentions of his name bring some members of the team to tears, and others still can’t fully open up about how difficult moving on has been.

NBCOlymipcs.com: 2018 U.S. Olympic bobsled team

It’s been nine months since Steven Holcomb died.

USA Bobsled is not over it, not by any stretch of the imagination.

Holcomb was the best bobsledder in U.S. history, and he was supposed to be at these PyeongChang Olympics for what likely would have been the final races of his career. Instead, the Americans will head to the start house at the Alpensia Sliding Center on Sunday for the first bobsled races of these games and face the nearly impossible task of doing as well as he would have done.

This season has been one struggle after another for the Americans. Nerves have been frayed all year. Results have been far from what the U.S. wanted or envisioned. Getting a third men’s sled to PyeongChang was a challenge until the final possible moment, something that certainly would not have been the case if Holcomb was still driving.

Read the rest of the story and watch live streams by clicking here