How wrestling can get back in the Olympics

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Wrestling was effectively ousted from the 2020 Olympics schedule in an IOC executive committee vote Tuesday at the headquarters in Switzerland, but that doesn’t mean it’s down for the count. The sport can actually gain a reprieve if it can survive two more IOC votes in the upcoming months.

“This is not the end of the process, this is purely a recommendation,” IOC spokesman Mark Adams told reporters after the executive board vote. “It is the session which is sovereign.”

It’s going to take a little convincing, though.

The IOC will now put wrestling up against the seven other sports that have fought long and hard to be added to the schedule, including karate, squash, roller sports, wakeboarding, sport climbing, the chinese martial art of wushu, and baseball and softball in a joint bid.

The first vote will take place among the executive board in St. Petersburg in May, which is a great omen since Russia has won the most wrestling medals at every Olympics since it first began competing as an independent nation at the 1996 Olympics.  But that vote will simply determine which sports will be proposed for the final vote among all the IOC members at a vote in Buenos Aires this September.

Each of the other proposed sports have had months, if not years, to literally pitch themselves to the IOC members (squash was arguably the most convincing), so if wrestling wants to win the vote, the governing body will no doubt have to lean on powerhouses like Russia, Japan and the U.S. for a bit of back room politicking to see if they can’t sway the members in their direction.

It’s not likely to happen, since the IOC executive committee’s decision holds a lot of clout, but if wrestling has anything on its side, it the sport’s history and worldwide popularity. Wrestling has been contested at all but one Olympics since 1896 (it took a quick break in 1900) and has seen more than fifty nations represented at every Summer Games since 1992, including a staggering 75 in Atlanta.

Wrestling fans can also look to baseball and softball for inspiration, since their bid is considered the front runner for the open spot in 2020 after both were similarly voted out in 2005 and were last contested at the Beijing Games in 2008.

USA Hockey to start reaching out to potential replacement players

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USA Hockey will begin reaching out to “alternate players” to determine their interest in playing for the U.S. at the women’s world championship next week amid a potential boycott by its national team.

The contact is taking place in the event a resolution cannot be reached between USA Hockey and the women’s national team in a wage dispute.

“It’s important for everyone to understand clearly that our objective is to have the players we named as the U.S. women’s national team be the ones that compete in the world championship,” said Dave Ogrean, executive director of USA Hockey, in a statement. “Productive conversations have taken place this week and are ongoing in our collective efforts to reach a resolution.”

The alternate players are in the professional NWHL and college, according to USA Today.

The world championship tournament starts March 31 in Plymouth, Mich.

As of Thursday evening, no resolution has come between USA Hockey and its women’s national team. Neither side has said when its next scheduled meeting will take place.

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MORE: NHL asked for decision on Olympics by end of April

NHL asked for decision on Olympics by end of April

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International Ice Hockey Federation President Rene Fasel tells The Associated Press he needs to know by the end of April whether NHL players will be cleared to play in the South Korea Olympics next year.

NHL team owners have made it clear they don’t want to stop their season again for the Winter Games and put their stars at risk of injury. The reluctance has come up before and yet the NHL has participated in the Olympics since 1998. This time, however, there seems to be an impasse.

The head of the NHL Players Association, Donald Fehr, says the players want to participate and hopes the league will take advantage of the chance to market the game in Asia.

However, NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly says without “material change to the current status quo, NHL players will not be participating in the 2018 Winter Olympics.”

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MORE: 2018 Olympic hockey groups set