How wrestling can get back in the Olympics

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Wrestling was effectively ousted from the 2020 Olympics schedule in an IOC executive committee vote Tuesday at the headquarters in Switzerland, but that doesn’t mean it’s down for the count. The sport can actually gain a reprieve if it can survive two more IOC votes in the upcoming months.

“This is not the end of the process, this is purely a recommendation,” IOC spokesman Mark Adams told reporters after the executive board vote. “It is the session which is sovereign.”

It’s going to take a little convincing, though.

The IOC will now put wrestling up against the seven other sports that have fought long and hard to be added to the schedule, including karate, squash, roller sports, wakeboarding, sport climbing, the chinese martial art of wushu, and baseball and softball in a joint bid.

The first vote will take place among the executive board in St. Petersburg in May, which is a great omen since Russia has won the most wrestling medals at every Olympics since it first began competing as an independent nation at the 1996 Olympics.  But that vote will simply determine which sports will be proposed for the final vote among all the IOC members at a vote in Buenos Aires this September.

Each of the other proposed sports have had months, if not years, to literally pitch themselves to the IOC members (squash was arguably the most convincing), so if wrestling wants to win the vote, the governing body will no doubt have to lean on powerhouses like Russia, Japan and the U.S. for a bit of back room politicking to see if they can’t sway the members in their direction.

It’s not likely to happen, since the IOC executive committee’s decision holds a lot of clout, but if wrestling has anything on its side, it the sport’s history and worldwide popularity. Wrestling has been contested at all but one Olympics since 1896 (it took a quick break in 1900) and has seen more than fifty nations represented at every Summer Games since 1992, including a staggering 75 in Atlanta.

Wrestling fans can also look to baseball and softball for inspiration, since their bid is considered the front runner for the open spot in 2020 after both were similarly voted out in 2005 and were last contested at the Beijing Games in 2008.

Alysia Montano announces pregnancy with clever video, no racing plans

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U.S. Olympic 800m runner Alysia Montaño is due in November with her second child, but this time she has no current plan to race at the U.S. Championships while pregnant.

Montaño’s husband and manager, Louis, said Wednesday that she has no races on her calendar (nationals are in late June) but hopes to continue her fitness during pregnancy. She may do a couple of 5Ks this summer.

Earlier Wednesday, the family announced the pregnancy in a clever video.

The video included the couple’s first child, Linnea, was born in August 2014, two months after Montaño made worldwide headlines for racing while eight months pregnant at nationals.

Montaño, 31, last raced at the Millrose Games on Feb. 11 in her first meet since falling in the Olympic Trials 800m final on July 4.

Montaño is set to be awarded her first two world outdoor championships medals, four and six years after she ran those races, due to a former Russian rival’s doping ban.

MORE: Montaño finds little joy after Russian stripped of medals

Sweden drops 2026 Winter Olympic bid

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The city of Stockholm says it won’t bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics.

Karin Wanngard, the city official in charge of finances, says the reason is because the International Olympic Committee will not be able to report how big the financial contribution to the host city will be.

She says the figures “will arrive at the earliest in November.”

This means that time will be too short to get enough analysis for the issues raised by several actors,” said the Swedish lawmaker, whose Social Democratic Party had been supportive of hosting the event.

“We Social Democrats have always thought that the Olympic Games are important for Stockholm’s growth and development,” Wanngard said in a statement, adding there was little backing for the event. “Unfortunately, we are alone to have this position about the Olympic Games.”

Swedish Sports Confederation chairman Bjorn Eriksson said he and his organization “fully respect the decision as we also believe in a realistic budget and a sustainable economy.”

Sports Minister Gabriel Wikstrom also supported the decision, adding that the Social Democratic-led government was “ready to handle requests for financial guarantees.”

“We have also been clear that it is Stockholm’s city that must make its decision first,” he told Sweden news agency TT.

The news comes six days after the Swedish Olympic Committee named a CEO for the 2026 bid.

In January, the committee said that Stockholm staging the 2026 Winter Olympics was “possible and desirable” and that a formal bid was expected in March 2018.

In 2015, Stockholm pulled out of the race for the 2022 Winter Games after Swedish politicians refused to give financial backing. Swedish politicians were uncomfortable because of concerns over costs, the environment, post-Games use of venues, the environment and other issues.

The early 2026 bid plan called for 80 percent of the events in Stockholm, while most of the Alpine competitions would be in the northern resort of Are, more than 600 kilometers (400 miles) from the capital. A few skiing events would be in Falun, 215 kilometers (130 miles) northwest from there.

The 2026 Winter Olympics have one bidder — Sion, Switzerland.

Cities in Austria, Canada, Japan and have also discussed potential 2026 bids, as has Lillehammer, Norway, the 1994 Winter Olympic host. The U.S. is not expected to bid for the 2026 Winter Games.

The next two Winter Olympics will be in East Asia in PyeongChang in 2018 and Beijing in 2022, giving a European or North American city a greater opening to be the 2026 host.

The 2026 Olympic host city is expected to be chosen from an International Olympic Committee members vote in 2019.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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