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How wrestling can get back in the Olympics

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Wrestling was effectively ousted from the 2020 Olympics schedule in an IOC executive committee vote Tuesday at the headquarters in Switzerland, but that doesn’t mean it’s down for the count. The sport can actually gain a reprieve if it can survive two more IOC votes in the upcoming months.

“This is not the end of the process, this is purely a recommendation,” IOC spokesman Mark Adams told reporters after the executive board vote. “It is the session which is sovereign.”

It’s going to take a little convincing, though.

The IOC will now put wrestling up against the seven other sports that have fought long and hard to be added to the schedule, including karate, squash, roller sports, wakeboarding, sport climbing, the chinese martial art of wushu, and baseball and softball in a joint bid.

The first vote will take place among the executive board in St. Petersburg in May, which is a great omen since Russia has won the most wrestling medals at every Olympics since it first began competing as an independent nation at the 1996 Olympics.  But that vote will simply determine which sports will be proposed for the final vote among all the IOC members at a vote in Buenos Aires this September.

Each of the other proposed sports have had months, if not years, to literally pitch themselves to the IOC members (squash was arguably the most convincing), so if wrestling wants to win the vote, the governing body will no doubt have to lean on powerhouses like Russia, Japan and the U.S. for a bit of back room politicking to see if they can’t sway the members in their direction.

It’s not likely to happen, since the IOC executive committee’s decision holds a lot of clout, but if wrestling has anything on its side, it the sport’s history and worldwide popularity. Wrestling has been contested at all but one Olympics since 1896 (it took a quick break in 1900) and has seen more than fifty nations represented at every Summer Games since 1992, including a staggering 75 in Atlanta.

Wrestling fans can also look to baseball and softball for inspiration, since their bid is considered the front runner for the open spot in 2020 after both were similarly voted out in 2005 and were last contested at the Beijing Games in 2008.

Elana Meyers Taylor crashes, brakewoman ejected (video)

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Two-time Olympic medalist Elana Meyers Taylor‘s start to the World Cup bobsled season was both record-breaking and painful.

Meyers Taylor and brakewoman Kehri Jones had the fastest women’s start time ever recorded on the 2010 Olympic track in Whistler, B.C., on Saturday.

But only one of them made it to the finish.

Meyers Taylor crashed the sled during their first run, with the impact causing Jones to eject out the back and slide along the chute before coming to a stop.

Both athletes were able to walk off the track, according to U.S. Bobsled.

Meyers Taylor missed four races last season while receiving treatment for long-term effects from a January 2015 concussion. She returned to win at the last two stops.

MORE: Why Steven Holcomb mulled retirement

Diver Sammy Lee, first Asian-American male gold medalist, dies at 96

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 18:  1948 and 1952 Olympic platform diving gold medalist Dr. Sammy Lee and Olympic diving hopeful Brittany Viola of the United States attend the Team USA Road to London 100 Days Out Celebration in Times Square on April 18, 2012 in New York City.  (Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images for USOC)
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Dr. Sammy Lee, the first Asian-American man to win an Olympic gold medal and first male diver to repeat as Olympic champion, died of pneumonia at age 96 on Friday, according to the University of Southern California.

Lee was born in Fresno, Calif., of Korean parents.

He unretired from a medical career to compete in his first Olympics in London in 1948, after the Games took a 12-year break due to World War II.

Lee earned platform gold and springboard bronze in 1948 and then retired, unretired and defended his platform title in 1952. Lee and another Asian-American, Victoria Manolo-Draves, who had a Filipino father and English mother, both won diving titles in 1948, with Draves’ springboard gold coming first.

Lee also served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during the Korean War.

He succeeded despite facing racial discrimination. From TeamUSA.org:

When Sammy was growing up, non-whites could use the pool where he practiced one day a week, on Wednesdays only. And then, as he has told it, the pool would be emptied after the non-whites used it, and fresh water was brought in the next day.

When the pool was off-limits, Sammy practiced by jumping into a sand pile.

Lee went on to coach divers, including Greg Louganis, after his competitive career, and continued his medical work. He graduated from USC’s medical school in 1947.

He is a member of the U.S. Olympic and International Swimming Halls of Fame.

*Correction: An earlier version of this post erroneously reported Lee was the first Asian-American Olympic champion. He was the second.