Richard Mackson-USA TODAY Sports

Jordan Burroughs fights to save wrestling

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While a number of retired wrestlers have turned in their medals in protest of the IOC’s decision to eliminate their sport from the 2020 Games, London freestyle champ Jordan Burroughs is using his words and stature instead, as he attempts to help save his sport from extinction.

Along with giving interviews, tweeting regularly, and showing solidarity with his Iranian wrestling brothers after winning a World Cup event in Tehran last month, Burroughs is working with the Committee to Preserve Olympic Wrestling to keep the conversation alive among fans of the sport.

“I’m just doing as much as I can to continue to allow this decision to be in the spotlight,” Burroughs told the AP. “I think Americans, as a nation and culture, once something is recognized for a week or two people kind of forget about.”

But it’ll take more than a couple well-placed smiles to win against the seven other prospective sports in two IOC votes, and Burroughs thinks wrestling, one of the Olympics oldest events, will need to show that it’s willing to modernize, much like squash has recently shown in its bid.

And apparently everything is on the table, including significant chances to Greco-Roman like adding leg holds. CPOW has also talked about changing the international match set of three two-minute rounds to one five-minute round, and making tweaks to the overtime format and the controversial ball-clinch rule.

“We’re definitely going to overhaul the sport. Make some rules changes to hopefully make it more exciting,” Burroughs added. “It’s tough. But people want to see more action. More points being scored.”

Winning both the May and September IOC votes after getting ousted will take the cooperation of wrestlers worldwide, and Burroughs believes that, while the decision has alarmed the group, it’s definitely put them all in lock-step toward a common goal.

“We’re competitors on the mat. But with the decision by the IOC, now everyone is coming together.”

2018 U.S. Figure Skating Championships to be in San Jose

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The 2018 U.S. Figure Skating Championships, the final competition to determine the Pyeongchang Olympic team, will be in San Jose, California, at the SAP Center, concluding Jan. 7.

It appears to be the earliest the U.S. Figure Skating Championships will end in an Olympic year in at least 50 years.

The competition will be broadcast live on NBC and streamed live on Icenetwork.com.

San Jose previously hosted the U.S. Championships in 1996 and 2012, but it has never hosted in an Olympic year.

Sochi Olympian Polina Edmunds is from San Jose and figures to receive a boost of crowd support. Edmunds, 18, begins classes at nearby Santa Clara University next month.

The January 2017 U.S. Championships will be in Kansas City. The international figure skating season starts next month, with Skate America kicking off the Grand Prix season in October.

Recent Nationals host cities in Olympic years were Boston in 2014 and Spokane, Washington, in 2010.

MORE: Ashley Wagner, Gracie Gold headline Skate America

Fiji Olympic rugby coach given 3 acres of land, special name

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 11:  Gold medalists Ro Dakuwaqa of Fiji and Fiji head coach Ben Ryan celebrate after the medal ceremony for the Men's Rugby Sevens on Day 6 of the Rio 2016 Olympics at Deodoro Stadium on August 11, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)
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Olympic coaches don’t receive gold medals. Fiji Olympic men’s rugby coach Ben Ryan may have gotten something better anyway.

Ryan’s reward for guiding Fiji to its first Olympic medal in any sport — gold in rugby sevens’ Olympic debut — included three acres of land in Fiji and a new name, Ratu Peni Raiyani Latianara, according to Fijian reports.

Ryan, a London native, is stepping down as coach of the Fijian team. The 44-year-old coached the team for three years after leading the England national sevens team for six years.

MORE: Fiji wins nation’s first Olympic medal