Olympic boxing drops headgear for Rio Games

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After watching wrestling get ousted from the Olympics, the International Boxing Association is doing whatever it can to innovate its sport, including some substantial rule changes that happened over the weekend.

Most notably, boxers will fight without head gear for the first time since the 1980 Moscow Games, and will compete under the professional 10-point per round scoring system, instead of the controversial punch-count system.

“There’s no evidence protective gear shows a reduction in incidence of concussion,” Charles Butler, chairman of AIBA’s medical commission, said. “In 1982, when the American Medical Association moved to ban boxing, everybody panicked and put headgear on the boxers. But nobody ever looked to see what the headgear did.”

Headgear has been a staple of the last eight Summer Olympics, but many believe that it allows boxers to sustain more jarring head shots over an extended period, and limits the competitors’ peripheral vision.

As far as the punch-count scoring – implemented mostly because Roy Jones Jr. was robbed of a gold at the Seoul Olympics – it’s been similarly maligned for being unsafe and susceptible to failure.

It’s believe that Both moves, which fall more in line with how professional boxing operates, will encourage top amateurs to compete in the Olympics rather than sidestep the Games and to start their careers.

“It is AIBA’s duty to bring the sport of boxing to the pinnacle of the Olympic Movement,” AIBA president Wu Ching-Kuo said. “I am convinced that these changes will critically contribute to the development of our beloved sport,”

World Cup champ lands first quad cork 1800 (video)

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Switzerland’s Andri Ragettli landed what’s being touted as the first ski quad cork 1800 in a video published recently.

Ragettli, 18, is one of the leading slopestyle skiers in the world. He won the World Cup season title in 2015-16 and placed second this year, in addition to fifth- and sixth-place finishes at the last two Winter X Games.

Previously, Ragettli became the first slopestyle skier to land back-to-back triples in a full competition at the 2016 Winter X Games, according to ESPN.com.

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MORE: McMorris’ brother details life-threatening crash

Mark McMorris’ brother details snowboarder’s life-threatening crash

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Mark McMorris‘ life was in danger after the snowboarder crashed into an area of trees riding in the backcountry in British Columbia on Saturday, according to Postmedia News, quoting older brother Craig.

Craig was there when McMorris, the Sochi slopestyle bronze medalist, suffered a fractured jaw, fractured left arm, ruptured spleen, stable pelvic fracture, rib fractures and a collapsed left lung.

McMorris was found conscious, but he was struggling to breathe with blood in his mouth, according to Canadian media.

“You can die from that, from bleeding out,” Craig said, according to Postmedia News. “But it was so hard for him to breathe, so that was my biggest concern with time. I communicated that to the search and rescue, and that’s why they got there as fast as they possibly could. Mark knew it was super bad. I knew it was super bad. But you just have to think positive, and that’s why he is still here.

More details of the rescue, via Postmedia News:

Craig McMorris and a handful of friends on site peeled off their jackets to create a nest for the injured Olympian. The couldn’t move him for fear of a spinal cord injury, and hypothermia was a real danger while waiting about 90 minutes for search and rescue personnel to arrive. Every minute counted due to the ruptured spleen.

“I’ve been involved in backcountry rescues before,” Craig said, according to the Canadian Press. “This was by far the gnarliest and most severe.”

An airlift to a hospital, two surgeries and two days later, McMorris was looking more upbeat in his hospital bed on both brothers’ Instagram pages Monday.

He has been named to Canada’s Olympic team for PyeongChang, and Craig believes he will be there to compete. Before the accident, McMorris was considered a gold-medal threat in slopestyle and the new event of big air.

“It’s been 48 hours, and he’s gone from being the most broken human to talking and communicating,” Craig said, according to Postmedia News. “In his mind, he’s going to the Olympics. In my mind, he’s going to the Olympics. There’s no reason why he can’t.”

McMorris has come back from injury before, but not this severe.

He won bronze in the first Olympic snowboard slopestyle event in Sochi, competing 12 days after breaking a rib.

He has already come back in this Olympic cycle from breaking his right femur in an Air and Style big air run in Los Angeles on Feb. 21, 2016.

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MORE: McMorris, after horrible injury, ups risk for 2 golds in PyeongChang

Kids tough as nails. All good news from here on out. So much love

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