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Oscar Pistorius cleared to race at Paralympic worlds

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South African sprinter Oscar Pistorius, who was charged with murdering girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp back in February, has been cleared by the world governing body for Paralympic sport to compete in the IPC World Championships in France this July, according to an internal report at the IPC acquired by the UK’s Telegraph Sport.

Pistorius’s agent Peet van Zyl will be notified that the six-time Paralympic gold medalist will be allowed to register after it was determined that he shouldn’t be barred from competing before his trial.

“I respect his wish to mourn Reeva’s death as long as it takes,” van Zyl told Telegraph Sport when presented with the news. “Only Oscar will be the one who decides when he wants to start training and race again, both [his coach] and myself respect the relationship we have as a trio.”

Many assumed the sprinter’s training had already started after photo of Pistorius walking on a high school track was published on the front page of the Afrikaans-language Beeld newspaper Thursday. But van Zyl said Pistorius was just out for a jog Tuesday after meeting with his agent and coach.

Although it seems his training will be coming pretty soon:

“This is not disrespectful to Reeva or her family,” van Zyl added. “This has been part of his life for so many years. If it makes things easier for him to work through it and get some sense back into his life, let him run and let him jog. He’s a human being and that’s maybe an outlet for him.”

MLB Players Association head says ‘continuing dialogue’ about 2020 Olympics

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SARASOTA, Fla. (AP) — The head of the Major League Baseball Players Association says it will be difficult for big leaguers to participate at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Baseball returns to Olympics after a 12-year absence for the Tokyo Games, which are scheduled for July 24-Aug. 9 — in the middle of baseball’s season.

“There are challenges with the schedule, and there are challenges with major leaguers being involved,” Tony Clark said Thursday at the Baltimore Orioles’ spring training camp.

In 2008, players on major league 25-man rosters and disabled lists on June 26 were ineligible to play. The U.S. roster included 17 players from Triple-A, seven from Double-A and college pitcher Stephen Strasburg, now with the Washington Nationals.

“It doesn’t mean that we are not continuing to have dialogue. We have going back. We will going forward. Where we land, I don’t know,” Clark said. “One of the things we were able to discuss during this round of bargaining were some additional flexibility in the schedule moving forward. Maybe there are some opportunities for a broader discussion than there have been a year ago. We’ll have to wait and see. We haven’t had that kind of substantive sit down yet.”

Many players are preparing for the fourth edition of World Baseball Classic, an international tournament launched in 2006 that is co-owned by Major League Baseball and the union. Clark hopes to see a fifth edition in 2021.

“I see no reason at this point why it wouldn’t,” he said. “I’m hopeful it continues, understanding that the world we live in four years from now may be different from the one we’re in now.”

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MORE: Some 2020 Olympic baseball games set 150 miles from Tokyo

Lance Armstrong’s $100 million trial set for November

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND - DECEMBER 20:  Lance Armstrong (C) heads out with cyclists on December 20, 2016 in Auckland, New Zealand. The disgraced Tour de France rider is in New Zealand to film a commercial, and put out a call on social media for local riders to join him on a ride along the Auckland Waterfront.  (Photo by Fiona Goodall/Getty Images)
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AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Lance Armstrong‘s $100 million legal fight with the federal government has been set for a November trial.

U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper on Thursday set a Nov. 6 trial start in Washington. Armstrong’s legal team had asked to postpone trial until 2018 because of a potential scheduling conflict.

The government wants Armstrong to pay back the $32 million the U.S. Postal Service paid his team for sponsorship, plus triple damages.

Armstrong’s former teammate Floyd Landis initially filed the whistle-blower case in 2010, accusing him of violating the sponsorship contract by taking performance-enhancing drugs. The government joined the case in 2013 after Armstrong admitted cheating and was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and 2000 Olympic bronze medal.

Landis, who was stripped of the 2006 Tour de France title for cheating, could collect up to 25 percent of damages awarded.

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MORE: Armstrong intrigued by ultra marathon, obstacle-course races