Rory’s nationality still up for debate

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After making the mistake of upsetting not one, but two nations while trying to decide whether to play for Ireland or Great Britain at the Rio Olympics, Rory McIlroy is getting some assistance from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club Wednesday.

Chief exec Peter Dawson said that since McIlroy competed for Ireland at previous events early in his golf career, rules dictate that he should carry that nationality with him into the Games.

“Because Rory’s history [is] of playing for Ireland at amateur level… that there may be a regulation within the Olympic rules that would require him to stay with that,” Dawson told the Independent.

He’s kind of right, but it’s not a hard and fast rule with the IOC, which allows athletes to switch nations so long as it’s at least three years ahead of the Games giving McIlroy a few more months to make a decision about Rio. Great Britain’s Aaron Cook now competes for Isle of Man and Brazilian gold medalist Arthur Zanetti is considering a switch, too, due to lack of national funding for his sport.

Rory, who as a Northern Irishman can decide which nation to represent, has previously said that he always felt more British growing up. That answer caused a stir in the golf crazy land of Ireland, and he and countryman Graeme McDowell have asked the IOC to step in and make a decision for them. They haven’t received a response, but Dawson’s “ruling” is a step in the right direction.

“I would very much like to take this burden of choice away from the player if we can possibly do it because it’s not fair to him,” Dawson added. “I think he’s made it pretty clear in one or two pronouncements that he’s worried about it and the last thing we want is players worrying about this.”

Tori Bowie does not want to double at world champs

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Add Tori Bowie to the list of sprinters not looking to double at the world championships in August.

Bowie won the 100m and finished third in the 200m at the USATF Outdoor Championships, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast.

That put her on the U.S. team for worlds in London in both sprints.

But Bowie, who earned Rio 100m silver and 200m bronze, was exhausted after four days of racing in Sacramento heat that eclipsed 110 degrees.

“I for sure don’t want to do the double [at worlds],” Bowie said Sunday. “I just wanted to give myself an option [to race the 100m or the 200m].”

Bowie said she and her coaches will probably decide her racing schedule for worlds in the next two to three weeks.

“More than anything I wanted to try to get this 100m right and try to achieve a gold medal somewhere,” Bowie said, according to TeamUSA.org. “I don’t have a gold medal yet individually, so that’s my main concern right now.”

If Bowie drops the 100m, Olympian Morolake Akinosun is in line to take her spot. If she drops the 200m, it’s Ariana Washington.

“I already experienced that, I did the double in Rio,” Bowie said. “I collected my two medals that I wanted to collect in both events. Right now, I’m satisfied.”

Deajah Stevens and Christian Coleman also made the U.S. team in both the 100m and 200m and are expected to compete in both events.

Meanwhile, both Olympic 200m champions — Usain Bolt and Elaine Thompson — are expected to sit out the 200m in London to focus on the 100m.

World 200m silver medalist Justin Gatlin, 2012 Olympic 200m champion Allyson Felix and LaShawn Merritt all pulled out of the 200m at USATF Outdoors, ruling out world championships doubles.

Gatlin doubled in 2015. Felix doubled in 2011 (200m and 400m) and tried to for Rio but finished fourth in the 200m at the Olympic Trials. Merritt raced the 200m and 400m in Rio.

Both Olympic 400m champions — Wayde van Niekerk of South Africa and Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the Bahamas — plan to also race the 200m at worlds.

MORE: Centrowitz recovers from ‘rock bottom’ to make world team

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World Taekwondo Federation drops acronym due to ‘negative connotations’

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The World Taekwondo Federation dropped its “WTF” acronym due to “negative connotations” and changed its logo and its name to World Taekwondo.

“In the digital age, the acronym of our federation has developed negative connotations unrelated to our organization,” World Taekwondo President Chungwon Choue said in a press release. “It was important that we rebranded to better engage with our fans. World Taekwondo is distinctive and simple to understand.”

The move was almost two years in the making.

In December 2015, World Taekwondo said it planned to lessen the use of the WTF acronym for marketing purposes, according to Inside the Games, but at the time did not plan to fully change the name.

MORE: Olympic taekwondo star accused of sexual abuse

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