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Usain Bolt looking for a fresh start in Rome

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World record sprinter Usain Bolt is hoping for a fresh start to the season in Rome this week after a disappointing showing in the Cayman Islands, where, despite winning, he ran only 10.09 seconds in the 100m; his slowest time in the finals of an event since joining the senior circuit.

“I did have a bad performance but we went back to the drawing board and worked out everything. We figured out what went wrong. I’m confident now,” Bolt told the Daily Record on Tuesday. “It’s a long season. Last season started badly also, so I’m just going to keep working.”

Bolt’s season has also been slowed by a mild hamstring strain that kept him out of his home meet in Kingston. He was replaced in the race by top rival Tyson Gay, who went on to run a world’s best for the season, winning in 9.86 seconds.

“My hamstring is much, much better now,” Bolt explained. “I’m training hard and hopefully everything this season will continue to be good… I’m looking forward to going out there and doing my best.”

Bolt is aiming for his third straight win in Rome, after taking the title in 9.91 seconds in 2011, and 9.76 seconds after a similarly slow start to last season, which ended with three more golds at the Olympics.

The six-time gold medalist top competition this week will be Athens gold and London bronze medalist Justin Gatlin, who ran a wind-aided 9.88 seconds last weekend in Oregon at the Prefontaine Classic, and Gatlin’s American teammate Mike Rodgers, who came in at 9.94 seconds in the same race.

“I never worry about one athlete,” Bolt said. “The big championship is always the big thing or me. He’s done a lot this season already but for me it’s when you show up and show that you’re the best at the big championships and that’s what I do, so I’m not really worried.”

IOC president wants life bans for Russian cheats

DOHA, QATAR - NOVEMBER 16: IOC President Thomas Bach closing remarks during the fourth day of the 21st ANOC General Assembly at the Sheraton Grand Hotel on November 16, 2016 in Doha, Qatar. (Photo by Mark Runnacles/Getty Images for ANOC)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Russian athletes and officials who are proven to have been part of a doping “manipulation system” should be banned for life from the Olympics, IOC President Thomas Bach said Thursday.

Bach gave his personal view one day before Canadian investigator Richard McLaren publishes a final report into alleged state-backed cheating at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

Proof of systematic doping would be “aggravated circumstances” to justify life bans, the IOC leader said at a news conference after a three-day executive board meeting.

“I would not like to see this person again at any Olympic Games in any function,” Bach said, noting that as an IOC disciplinary commission chairman he approved life bans for Austrian team members implicated in doping at the 2006 Turin Winter Games.

However, proving that individual athletes knew of systematic doping involving state agencies could be difficult.

McLaren, who was appointed by the World Anti-Doping Agency in May, is expected to give more detail about cheating operations at the Sochi laboratory.

In his interim report in July, McLaren confirmed claims by former lab director Grigory Rodchenkov of a hole-in-the-wall swapping system aided by the FSB security agency to exchange athletes’ dirty urine samples for clean ones.

Earlier Thursday, the IOC member appointed to oversee disciplinary cases that arise from McLaren’s evidence acknowledged they could be tough to prove.

“Can you prove (athletes) were aware?” Denis Oswald, a Swiss lawyer, said on the sidelines of a sports law conference in Geneva.

“It is not that we would be scared to attack high level people in the Russian regime,” the Swiss lawyer said. “The question is more on the legal point of view. Can you punish athletes if they have done nothing and whether they were not aware of what was happening?”

Bach has also appointed a second IOC commission, headed by former Switzerland president Samuel Schmid, to evaluate if McLaren’s report and evidence proves a state-run doping system.

“And then based on that we will see if we can start cases against athletes,” Oswald said.

Meanwhile, United States lawmakers want Bach to attend a congressional committee hearing next Thursday to provide an update on sports’ fight against doping.

“Unfortunately I cannot attend there,” said Bach, adding that the IOC will “provide by other means all the information they may need.”

MORE: Russia sets 2018 Olympics medal target

IOC president doesn’t rule out awarding 2028 Olympic host in 2017

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 23: The Olympic Flag waves as part of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics Closing Ceremony at Fisht Olympic Stadium on February 23, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Joe Scarnici/Getty Images)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — IOC President Thomas Bach says he wants to change the Olympic host city bidding procedure because it “produces too many losers.”

Bach’s comments came on the same day the IOC executive board cleared all three candidate cities for the 2024 Olympics — Paris, Los Angeles and Budapest, Hungary — to advance to the next stage of the race.

Bach did not categorically rule out the possibility of awarding the hosting rights for two games at once — 2024 and 2028 — when the IOC votes next September in Lima, Peru.

Bach said at a news conference “it is not the purpose of an Olympic candidature procedure to produce losers.”

He said the goal is “to produce the best possible host for an Olympic Games.”

Asked about speculation the IOC could award the 2024 and 2028 Olympics at the same time, he said: “Let us study this question, which is not an easy one.”

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