Tiger Woods

Your (Potential) 2016 Rio Olympics Golf Field

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As we edge closer to this year’s U.S. Open, and to the return of golf to the Olympics in 2016, we at OlympicTalk wish to once again bring you the potential field of Rio Olympics men’s golfers.

In the 60-man Rio field, rules dictate that the first fifteen golfers are determined by their spot in the world golf rankings regardless of nationality. After that, every eligible nation gets a max of two golfers, so long as those two spots aren’t already taken by athletes in the top fifteen. So in the case of Team USA, which would send six golfers, you better be high to very high in the rankings. As for Venezuela, just being No. 334 in the world would been enough to get you into the field. Also, as the host, Brazil automatically gets two spots, which will likely bump someone.

The current list also highlights how important Rory McIlroy and Graeme McDowell’s decision to play for either Great Britain or Ireland might be on the field. This list assumes they’ll play for Great Britain. But since both are in the top-fifteen, if they played for Ireland then the spots occupied by Padraig Harrington and Shane Lowry would be given to another country further down the list.

Here’s the list as it stands based on this week’s World Golf Rankings:

1. Tiger Woods, USA
2. Rory McIlroy, Great Britain
3. Adam Scott, Australia
4. Matt Kuchar, USA
5. Justin Rose, Great Britain
6. Luke Donald, Great Britain
7. Brandt Snedeker, USA
8. Graeme McDowell, Great Britain
9. Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa
10. Phil Mickelson, USA
11. Lee Westwood, Great Britain
12. Keegan Bradley, USA
13. Steve Stricker, USA
14. Charl Schwartzel, South Africa
15. Sergio Garcia, Spain

16. (23) Peter Hanson, Sweden
17. (25) Matteo Manassero, Italy
18. (26) Jason Day, Australia
19. (33) Henrik Stenson, Sweden
20. (34) Martin Kaymer, Germany
21. (35) Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark
22. (38) Francesco Molinari, Italy
23. (41) Gonzalo Fdez-Castano, Spain
24. (46) Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium
25. (52) Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand
26. (58) Marcel Siem, Germany
27. (59) Angel Cabrera, Argentina
28. (62) Bernd Wiesberger, Austria
29. (64) Hideki Matsuyama, Japan
30. (66) Mikko Ilonen, Finland
31. (70) Padraig Harrington, Ireland
32. (72) Hiroyuki Fujita, Japan
33. (73) Thomas Bjorn, Denmark
34. (75) Brendon de Jonge, Zimbabwe
35. (81) Bae Sang-moon, Korea
36. (83) Shane Lowry, Ireland
37. (87) Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand
38. (96) Joost Luiten, Holland
39. (98) K.J. Choi, Korea
40. (105) Graham Delaet, Canada
41. (111) Raphael Jacquelin, France
42. (118) Victor Dubuisson, France
43. (123) Gaganjeet Bhullar, India
44. (126) Felipe Aguilar, Chile
45. (136) Vijay Singh, Fiji
46. (139) Jeev Milkha Singh, India
47. (150) Ricardo Santos, Portugal
48. (157) Liang Wen-chong, China
49. (169) Juvic Pagunsan, Philippines
50. (170) Michael Hendry, New Zealand (50)
51. (193) David Hearn, Canada
52. (194) Wu Ashun, China
53. (209) Andres Romero, Argentina
54. (240) Siddikur Rahman, Bangladesh
55. (246) Camilo Villegas, Colombia
56. (253) Adilson da Silva, Brazil
57. (260) Espen Kofstad, Norway
58. (321) Tim Sluiter, Netherlands
59. (334) Jhonattan Vegas, Venezuela
60. (353) Alexandre Rocha, Brazil

However, if Rory and McDowell sign up with Ireland:
57. (334) Jhonattan Vegas, Venezuela
58. (341) Jose de Jesus Rodriguez, Mexico
59. (353) Alexandre Rocha, Brazil
60. (355) Antonio Lascuna, Philippines

Rory McIlroy says Olympic participation still ‘complicated,’ ‘difficult’

HAINAN ISLAND, CHINA - NOVEMBER 23:  Graeme McDowell (R) and Rory McIlroy of Ireland walk behind a flag bearer during the Opening Ceremony of the Omega Mission Hills World Cup at the Mission Hills' Blackstone Course on November 23, 2011 in Hainan Island, China.  (Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images)
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Rory McIlroy has said he was proven wrong about golf’s place in the Olympics, but that doesn’t necessarily mean he’s keen on the 2020 Tokyo Games after skipping Rio.

The four-time major champion was asked Wednesday if he had any plans to play in the next Olympics and called it a “tough question.”

“The participation in the Olympics for me, it’s just a little more complicated I feel for me than some other people from where I’m from and the whole politics of the thing,” McIlroy said. “It’s a difficult subject for me.”

McIlroy is from Northern Ireland, which does not have a separate delegation at the Olympics. That led to a scrutinized decision for McIlroy, who had to choose in 2014 between representing Great Britain and Ireland for golf’s Olympic return in Rio.

McIlroy opted for Ireland, which he represented at the World Cup of Golf in 2009 and 2011.

“I don’t know whether it’s been because the World Cup has been in Brazil and I’ve been thinking a couple of years down the line,” McIlroy reportedly said in June 2014. “Thinking about all the times that I played as an amateur for Ireland and as a boy and everything, I think for me it’s the right decision to play for Ireland in 2016.”

Golf’s place in the Olympics is not guaranteed beyond 2020, so Tokyo may be McIlroy’s last opportunity.

“Four years’ time is a long ways away, so we’ll see what happens,” McIlroy said Wednesday. “Right now, I’ll concentrate on the 16 majors that we have between now and then and try to get a few more of those and go from there.”

MORE: Tim Finchem eyes Olympic golf change in 2020

Rita Jeptoo stripped of Boston Marathon win, ban extended

BOSTON, MA - APRIL 21:  Rita Jeptoo of Kenya crosses the finish line to win the 118th Boston Marathon on April 21, 2014 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
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Kenyan Rita Jeptoo‘s doping ban has been doubled, to October 30, 2018, and her 2014 Boston and Chicago Marathon wins were stripped, the Court of Arbitration for Sport said Wednesday.

Jeptoo repeated as Boston Marathon winner in 2014, one year after twin bombings rocked the world’s oldest annual 26.2-mile race, in a women’s course record 2:18:57.

Jeptoo, 35, tested positive for EPO in an out-of-competition sample in Kenya on Sept. 25, 2014, three weeks before she won her second straight Chicago Marathon.

Athletics Kenya handed Jeptoo a backdated two-year suspension in January 2015, a punishment that was appealed by the IAAF, which sought a longer ban. Jeptoo also appealed the ban but later withdrew her motion.

“In coming to its decision, the Panel found to its comfortable satisfaction that the athlete used rEPO over a period of time to enhance performance,” the court said in a press release Wednesday. “The undisputed source of the rEPO found in her sample of 25 September 2014 was an injection given to her by a doctor. The athlete provided various differing accounts of the circumstances leading up to the injection and also regarding her relationship with that doctor.

“According to the applicable rules, the minimum period of ineligibility in this situation is a sanction of two years but can be increased to up to four years in the case of aggravating circumstances. The Panel is comfortably satisfied that there are aggravating circumstances in the case at hand as it was obvious to the Panel that the athlete used rEPO as part of a scheme or plan. The evidence for this includes inter alia her long relationship with the doctor in question, her multiple visits to see him, that her rEPO use was consistent with her competition calendar, that she hid the visits to the doctor in question from her manager and coach, as well as her deceptive and obstructive conduct throughout the proceedings. Weighing all the evidence, the Panel is comfortably satisfied that the circumstances warrant a period of ineligibility of four years.”

Ethiopians Buzunesh Deba and Mare Dibaba stand to be upgraded from second to first in the 2014 Boston and Chicago Marathons, respectively. Deba’s time of 2:19:59 stands to be the new Boston women’s course record.

Jeptoo also won the Boston Marathon in 2006.

VIDEO: Kenenisa Bekele misses marathon world record by 6 seconds