Boxing organizations don’t want pros in the Olympics

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A new rule set in place by the International Boxing Association that would allow pros with fewer than fifteen bouts on their records to compete in the upcoming Olympics is in jeopardy after protests from boxing organizations and promoters.

Now North American Boxing Federation President Joseph Dwyer is getting into the fight, and said his organization supports the protests against the AIBA. He believes allowing pros in the Olympics would put amateurs from underdeveloped countries at a dangerous disadvantage.

“In boxing, athletes punch each other and might get hurt if a non-experienced boxer is fighting against a professional…” Dwyer said. “We respectfully but strongly request AIBA not to proceed to his ruling, and the IOC not to accept it for the fatalities that might occur.”

The European Boxing Union has also been vocal about their distaste for the rule, using similar arguments regarding violence to suggest that the AIBA is trying to “force professionalism into the Olympic Games.” Of course, we’re not talking about anyone jumping into the ring with Mike Tyson. Again, rules state that the “pro” must be on the AIBA’s own circuit and have fewer than fifteen bouts on his record to compete.

AIBA President Wu Ching-kuo hoped the rule would help young boxers earn salaries and prize money so they’re not immediately lured away by the promises of agents and promoters. The AIBA is also doing away with headgear and changing the controversial punch-count scoring system to make the event safer and more professional, which might encourage amateurs to compete in the Games.

More of best GIFs from PyeongChang Olympics

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The 2018 Winter Games are over, but that doesn’t mean we’ll forget all the amazing heights reached by American athletes. Take a look back at a few of them here with an added twist, powered by Giphy:

18 most dominant athletes from the 2018 Olympics

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My 18 most dominant gold medalists at the Olympics, choosing at least one from each sport. 

1. Ester Ledecka, Czech Republic, Alpine Skiing/Snowboarding
Arguably the greatest athlete on the planet after taking surprise gold in Alpine skiing’s super-G and snowboarding’s parallel giant slalom (where she was the clear favorite). The 22-year-old became the third athlete to win individual Winter Olympic gold medals in different sports, the first since 1932 and the first woman. The other two were done in cross-country skiing and Nordic combined, the latter being a mixture of ski jumping and cross-country skiing. Ledecka’s feat was certainly more impressive.

2. Marit Bjørgen, Norway, Cross-Country Skiing
The most decorated athlete at the Games with five medals, including two golds. Bigger, though, is that the 37-year-old mom broke countryman Ole Einar Bjørndalen’s record for career Winter Olympic medals, finishing with 15. She also tied Bjørndalen and Bjørn Dæhlie’s record of eight Winter Olympic titles by winning the last event of the Games, the 30km, by 109 seconds, the largest Olympic cross-country margin of victory in 38 years. In her final career Olympic race.

3. Yun Sung-Bin, South Korea, Skeleton
Under host-nation pressure, the man in the Iron Man helmet had the fastest run in each of the four heats and won by 1.63 seconds, the largest margin in Olympic skeleton history.

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