Ryan Lochte

What U.S. swim stars have been up to since London Olympics

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The year after an Olympics is often break time for athletes recovering to gear up for the next Games. That’s not apparent at this week’s USA Swimming national championships. Most of the 35 U.S. medalists at the London Aquatics Centre are in the field at the IUPUI Natatorium in Indianapolis through Sunday. They’re bidding for top-two finishes to qualify for individual events at the world championships in Barcelona, which begin July 28.

Who isn’t swimming in Indy? The retired Michael Phelps, Jason Lezak and Peter Vanderkaay, as well as Brendan Hansen. Rebecca Soni and Eric Shanteau are on extended post-Olympic breaks.

Of the headliners competing, here’s a look at what they’ve been up to since London:

Ryan Lochte: What has Ryan Lochte done? Well, his own TV show, for starters. He’s also decided to leave his longtime training base, Gainesville, Fla., for a fresh environment after worlds. Despite words of warning Troy for lackluster early-season times, Lochte’s still the class of the American men across several events, going into nationals with the top U.S. times in the 200 backstroke, 100 butterfly and 200 and 400 individual medleys, according to FINA. Lochte entered 11 events at nationals, but he will surely scratch some.

Missy Franklin: The bubbly five-time 2012 medalist hasn’t slowed down too much in or out of the pool. She met Justin Bieber, chose a college, graduated high school and met Prince Harry among other dryland exploits. In a suit, she’s still a record-breaker. She lowered the national championship mark in winning the 100-meter freestyle in 53.43 on Monday. Franklin’s plenty busy in Indianapolis, having entered six events.

Allison Schmitt: Schmitt, a five-time medalist in London, capped her collegiate career with three more NCAA titles and Georgia’s first team title since 2005. She returned to the North Baltimore Aquatic Club (as did her coach, Bob Bowman, after nine months away). At nationals, she was less than her dominant self to start out, missing the A final in the 100 and 200 free.

Nathan Adrian: The sizzling sprinter can focus solely on professional swimming, having graduated from Cal last year. Adrian told SwimSwam.com in April he’s added 10 pounds, most of it muscle, that may help his explosiveness in the 50 free. Adrian backed up his Olympic gold in the 100 free by besting a field that included six Olympic champions on the opening night of nationals. He’s booked for Barcelona.

Natalie Coughlin: Many thought Coughlin, 31, would hang up her suit after collecting her 12th Olympic medal in the 4×100 free relay in London. But the desire is still there, after a winter trip to watch gorillas. With Phelps’ retirement, Coughlin is now the most decorated active Olympian. Her event focus shifted after her third Olympics. The two-time Olympic backstroke champion is only swimming the 50 and 100 freestyles in Indianapolis.

No Zika cases from Olympics, WHO says

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 12:  An aerial view of the Christ The Redeemer statue (F) and the Maracana Stadium (B) on November 12, 2013 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)
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There have been zero Zika virus cases stemming from the Rio Olympics, the World Health Organization said Thursday.

“From the reports WHO received from national health authorities, there have so far been no laboratory confirmed cases of Zika virus in anyone associated with the Olympics,” the organization said in an online update Thursday.

Earlier this summer, several athletes cited Zika concerns in skipping the Olympics.

The World Health Organization said before the Rio Games that the Olympics posed “a very low risk” of accelerating the Zika virus spread around the world.

Thousands of athletes will come to Rio for the Paralympics that run from Sept. 7-18, which is still during Brazil’s winter, lessening the Zika risk.

MORE: Hope Solo banned 6 months after Olympic comments

Devon Allen weighs turning pro in track and field

Devon Allen
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University of Oregon hurdler and wide receiver Devon Allen said he “thinks” he’s turning pro in track, but also said he hasn’t really decided if his NCAA track career is finished Thursday.

“There’s not really much more I can do in college track other than break the collegiate record,” Allen said.

Allen, a University of Oregon junior, finished fifth in the Rio Olympic 110m hurdles on Aug. 16 after winning the Olympic Trials on July 9.

Allen can turn pro in track and field and still play football for the Ducks, so long as he keeps his track and field profits to prize money and not endorsement deals.

He’s definitely planning on playing for Oregon’s football team this season, perhaps even in the season opener Sept. 3.

As for track season next winter and spring, that’s looking unlikely. Allen noted that he has won NCAA individual and team titles.

The only missing piece is the NCAA record of 13.00 set by former world-record holder Renaldo Nehemiah. Allen’s personal best is 13.03.

It’s clear that Allen would like to be a professional in both track and football.

“The NFL is something I’ve been dreaming about doing, just like I dreamed about running in the Olympics,” said Allen, who caught nine passes for 94 yards last season, coming back from tearing knee ligaments in the Rose Bowl. “I kind of accomplished that Olympic dream, obviously, in four years, I want to win a gold medal, so that’s one more step to that dream. Now my next dream is to play in the NFL.”

VIDEO: Top track and field moments from Rio Olympics