Gay of the U.S., Ashmeade of Jamaica and Powell of Jamaica compete in the 100m event of the Lausanne Diamond League meeting in Lausanne

Tyson Gay wins Lausanne 100 in 9.79; Diamond League recap

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Tyson Gay continued his world-best form by winning the 100 meters in 9.79 seconds at the Diamond League meet in Lausanne, Switzerland, on Thursday.

Gay now owns the three fastest times in the world this season — adding the 9.79 (with a barely legal 2.0 wind) to a 9.75 and a 9.86 — after beating former world-record holder Asafa Powell, who clocked a season’s best 9.88 for second place. American Mike Rodgers was third in 9.96.

Another impressive performance from Gay puts more scrutiny on Usain Bolt, who runs a 200 in Paris on Saturday. Bolt’s best 100 time this season is a pedestrian (for him) 9.94 at Jamaican nationals. Bolt was beaten by American Justin Gatlin in Rome on June 6.

Is Gay the current favorite for the world championships, which begin Aug. 10 in Moscow? You could make a strong argument, but even Gay expects better out of Bolt in Russia.

“It’s no secret that this guy is a championship performer and you have to bring your ‘A’ game to beat him, or better than your ‘A’ game,” he said before the Lausanne meet, according to The Associated Press.

The women’s 100 hurdles saw a shock in Australian Olympic champion Sally Pearson finishing seventh out of eight in 12.69 seconds. Pearson is coming back from a hamstring injury, but in three races since June 27 hasn’t run within four tenths of U.S. champion Brianna Rollins’ world lead.

2008 Olympic champion Dawn Harper won the hurdles in a season’s best 12.53, leading a U.S. sweep with Kellie Wells (12.58) and Lolo Jones (12.60). Jones later led off the U.S. 4×100 relay, which was disqualified on Jones’ handoff to the second runner.

In the women’s 200, U.S. champion Kimberlyn Duncan placed third in 22.73 in her first individual race in Europe. Olympic bronze medalist Carmelita Jeter, coming back from a quad injury, was fifth in 22.77, a season’s best. The world lead is held by Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce — 22.13.

David Oliver, who surprisingly missed the 2012 Olympic team, ran a world-leading 13.03 to win the 110 hurdles over fellow Americans Jason Richardson (13.20), Ryan Wilson (13.27) and David Payne (13.30). Oliver had finished second to Wilson at the U.S. Championships.

American Francena McCorory edged reigning world champion Amantle Montsho of Botswana in the 400, 50.36 to 50.37. Jamaican Novlene Williams-Mills, who competed in the London Olympics a month after learning she had breast cancer, was third in 50.87.

Nigerian Blessing Okagbare showed her versatility by beating Olympic champion Brittney Reese in the long jump with a 6.98-meter jump. Okagbare won the 200 in Birmingham on Sunday, an event where she holds the second-fastest time in the world this year.

IPC president: Now is the right time to have Paralympics in Brazil

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International Paralympic Committee president Philip Craven said the upcoming Paralympic Games, which open in 100 days, could not be going to a better city than Rio de Janeiro.

“Many people might think that it’s not the time to go there now with the economic and political problems,” Craven said in a phone interview last week. “But is that not just the right time to be going, to just show what sport can truly do to mobilize and galvanize a people?”

And the Zika virus?

“We believe that the measures that have been communicated on a regular basis, reiterated to our member nations, will be effective, and the Zika virus will not have a major effect on the Games,” Craven said.

The Paralympics will visit South America for the first time in their 15th edition. The Rio Games, which run from Sept. 7-18, will have more broadcast coverage than ever and an expected record number of athletes and nations in the largest number of sports on a single Paralympic program.

NBC and NBCSN will air a record 66 hours of coverage of the Games. The USOC will provide live coverage at TeamUSA.org, too.

How the Paralympics will deal with the well-known issues facing Brazil will be largely impacted by how the preceding Olympics handle them.

But one issue unique to the Paralympics came to light four weeks ago.

A British Paralympic champion swimmer was disqualified from a European Championships event because his Olympic rings tattoo was not covered (he later competed at the meet with the tattoo covered).

An International Paralympic Committee swimming rule states, “body advertisements are not allowed in any way whatsoever (this includes tattoos and symbols).”

The rule will cover all sports at the Rio Paralympics. Craven said he has not heard of any appeals by para-athletes to change the rule.

The IPC will take a “common-sense approach” to enforcing the rule in Rio to make sure there are no disqualifications by communicating thoroughly to national committees, Craven said.

“IPC has got very strict rules for the Paralympic Games and for other events prohibiting body advertisements, and this includes tattoos for commercial brands and non-IPC symbols, such as the Olympic rings,” Craven said. “These rules were emphasized, re-emphasized to all competing teams and swimmers at that particular event, and, similarly, we’ll be doing so prior to the Games in Rio.”

Some Paralympians identify themselves as Olympians, too — some have event competed in both Games — but Craven made the difference clear.

The 65-year-old, five-time Paralympic wheelchair basketball player likened Olympic rings tattoos at the Paralympics to an NFL player with an NBA team tattoo.

Craven added that there has been no pressure from the IOC regarding the rule and that he would expect a hypothetical Paralympian competing at the Olympics to cover up a tattoo of the Agitos, which is the Paralympic logo.

“We want Paralympic athletes to show pride in promoting the Paralympic movement, including our symbol, which is the Agitos, which is very different from the Olympic rings,” Craven said. “When you have a Paralympic athlete, a para-athlete sporting a branding from another event, then it just creates confusion. It creates confusion for the IPC. It creates confusion for the IOC.”

MORE: Paralympic champ long jumper still hopes to be allowed into Olympics

First four U.S. Olympic archers qualified; Khatuna Lorig waits

Khatuna Lorig
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The first four U.S. Olympic archers for Rio are known, while Khatuna Lorig will learn in three weeks if she makes her sixth Olympic team.

A full men’s team of 2012 Olympic team silver medalists Brady Ellison and Jake Kaminski and first-time Olympian Zach Garrett earned their spots at the U.S. Olympic Trials that ended Monday.

Mackenzie Brown clinched her first Olympic berth by winning the women’s trials Monday.

The U.S. can send two more women to Rio if it qualifies a full team at a World Cup event in Turkey in three weeks. Those two women would be Hye Youn Park and Lorig.

Lorig, 42, is best known for teaching archery to Jennifer Lawrence before “The Hunger Games.” Lorig also competed in the 1992 Olympics for the Unified Team, the 1996 and 2000 Games for Georgia and the 2008 and 2012 Olympics for the U.S.

Lorig earned team bronze at Barcelona 1992 and finished fifth and fourth individually at the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

The U.S. Olympic team alternates are Daniel McLaughlin and La Nola Pritchard.

MORE: Full list of athletes qualified for U.S. Olympic team