Lolo Jones

Student granted Twitter date by Lolo Jones speaks out

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Lolo Jones direct messaged the college student who received 150,000 retweets in an effort to get a date with the Olympic athlete, confirming that she would go on a date with him, the student said.

Bubby Lyles said in a telephone interview that Jones told him to email his contact information last night after her final scheduled track meet of 2013 in Lausanne, Switzerland.

“I’m looking forward to meeting you, and I’m looking forward to our date,” Jones messaged, according to Lyles.

Lyles, a rising senior at Georgia State University, received 150,000 retweets in two weeks after Jones told him on Twitter that she would go on a date with him if he reached the magic number. He passed 150,000 just before Jones competed at a Diamond League meet in Lausanne on Thursday.

Jones first heard the news in a post-meet interview with Flotrack, when she said she would go on the date.

Lyles said he thought of the idea out of the blue.

“I couldn’t just tweet her and say ‘Let’s go out on a date,'” he said Friday afternoon. “She wouldn’t do that just on the fly. I thought, give her some incentive. What’s an outrageous number most people would think would be unreachable? I came up with 150,000, and it went from there.”

Lyles got a little help from his friends. A Georgia State football player reached out to Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray to retweet him. Phoenix Suns guard Kendall Marshall and a few MLB players did as well.

“It started off slow, really slow, then it got to a point where 10,000 to 15,000 (retweets) a day,” said Lyles, who received media attention from TV stations in his home of Atlanta and Jones’ home of Baton Rouge, La., as he approached 150,000.

Lyles said he watched the Flotrack interview but wasn’t surprised when Jones said she would hold up her end of the bargain.

“I was happy to see the proof I guess, because I guess a lot of people put it out that she won’t go through with it,” he said. “That thought never crossed my mind.”

Lyles said his iPhone 5 crashed a few times with people texting him and Twitter notifications, though he said he turned off notifications on retweets.

The big question now is, where and when does the date take place?

“That’s kind of like up in the air, because she said she’d fly me up,” he said. “It could be here in Atlanta, or in Baton Rouge, which I expect it to be. Once we get a date and time I can really dig in and figure out (where to take her).”

Lyles received suggestions from his social media helpers and the media. The coolest destination he said was in Las Vegas. Many others mentioned McDonald’s or Golden Corral.

The other question — why did you pick Jones?

“I remember watching her in the Olympics last year,” he said. “She was a cute girl. I know that sounds so stupid, you probably watch TV and say she’s good looking and won’t think twice about it. … She seems like she has a really great personality. She has good morals, which I’m about, too. She seems like a really good person, which is what I’m looking for. She’s in shape. I work out six days a week myself. She says she eats a lot, I know about that because I’m always hungry. I train hard myself, not as hard as her, she’s an Olympian. It seems like we have little things in common. I figure why not go for it.”

Jones offered to pay for the date in Thursday’s interview, but Lyles insisted otherwise.

“I really want to pay for it because I feel that’s the gentlemanly thing to do,” he said. “I appreciate that offer. … I’d never let a woman pay for a date.”

Lolo Jones ends track season early for bobsled training

Vera Caslavska, gymnastics legend, dies at 74

Vera Caslavska
AP
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PRAGUE (AP) — Věra Čáslavská, the second-most decorated Olympic female gymnast who stood up against the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia, has died. She was 74.

The Czech Olympic Committee on Wednesday said Čáslavská died in Prague late Tuesday. Čáslavská had cancer of the pancreas and underwent surgery on May 15 last year, the committee previously said. She later had chemotherapy treatment.

Čáslavská won 11 Olympic medals, including seven golds, combined in the 1960, 1964 and 1968 Olympics.

She was mentioned many times going into and during the Rio Olympics as the last woman to win back-to-back Olympic all-around titles, which Gabby Douglas was attempting to duplicate.

Only former Soviet star Larisa Latynina earned more Olympic medals among female gymnasts than Čáslavská, who doubles as the most decorated Czech Olympian of all time.

Born on May 3, 1942 in Prague, Čáslavská claimed her first Olympic medal — a silver — at the 1960 Rome Games.

Her golden era began four years later.

She won three Olympic golds in Tokyo in 1964 — in the vault, the individual all-round and the balance beam — to establish herself as a major force in her sport.

Four years later, Čáslavská became an outspoken supporter of Alexander Dubček‘s liberal reforms meant to lead toward democratization of communist Czechoslovakia, an era known as the Prague Spring. She signed the Two Thousand Words manifesto published in June 1968 that called for deeper pro-democratic changes. That document angered the Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev, who ordered the Warsaw Pact’s troops to invade Czechoslovakia to crush the reforms in August.

Facing a possible persecution, Čáslavská went into hiding and was allowed only just before the Mexico Olympics to join the national gymnastics team.

She triumphed in four disciplines, winning the Olympic gold in the vault, the individual all-round, the floor exercises and the uneven bars. With another two silver medals at the 1968 Games, she became the top medalist and was later named the world’s female athlete of the year.

For many, she will be remembered for her silent protest against the Soviet invasion. Standing on the top of the medal stands alongside Soviet gymnast Larisa Petrik, with whom she shared the gold in the floor exercise, Čáslavská turned her head down and to the right when the Soviet national anthem was played.

Combined with her gymnastic performances, the gesture made her the star of the Games.

At home, Čáslavská faced persecution from the post-invasion hard-line Communist regime. It wasn’t until 1974 that she was allowed to work as coach in her country and later, in 1979-81, in Mexico.

After the 1989 anti-communist Velvet Revolution led by Vaclav Havel ended more than 40 years of communism, Čáslavská became Havel’s adviser and was elected the president of the Czechoslovak and later of the Czech Olympic Committee. In 1995-2001, she was a member of the International Olympic Committee.

She received the U.N.’s Pierre de Coubertin Prize for promoting fair play in 1989 and was also awarded the Olympic Order.

In a personal setback, her marriage with Josef Odložil, an athlete whom she married during the Mexico Games, ended in the 1980s. Her son, Martin, was found guilty of assault that led to his father’s death in 1993 and was sentenced to four years in prison. Although he was soon pardoned by Havel, Čáslavská had to undergo treatment for depression and withdrew temporarily from the public life.

MORE: Simone Biles’ longtime coach takes new job

Amy Purdy, Winter Paralympic medalist, to perform at Rio Paralympic Opening Ceremony

Amy Purdy
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Amy Purdy made her name as a snowboardcross bronze medalist at the Sochi Paralympics and runner-up on “Dancing with the Stars” in 2014.

In September, she’ll combine both.

Purdy will perform as a dancer in the Rio Paralympic Opening Ceremony on Sept. 7, in addition to being an NBC reporter during the Games.

She was told her performance will be four to five minutes. On “Dancing with the Stars,” her performances were about 90 seconds, she said. She traveled to Rio for a week of rehearsals in July.

Purdy, 36, survived bacterial meningitis in 1999 but lost both her legs and later needed a kidney from her father at age 20.

“I’m most excited about the concept of this dance,” Purdy said. “Just the idea of man versus machine. A lot of times we feel really limited because of our prosthetics. But this dance, hopefully, will kind of shatter those borders a little bit and allow me to move my body in a way I haven’t done before.”

Purdy is an innovator. She built her own snowboard and is seen as instrumental in getting her sport into the Paralympic program beginning in 2014.

A model, she’s been in a Madonna music video, a Super Bowl commercial, ESPN the Magazine’s Body Issue and competed on “The Amazing Race” in 2012.

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