World University Games

World University Games have 100-point basketball blowout

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Remember when the U.S. men’s basketball team beat Nigeria 156-73 at the London Olympics?

They’ve got nothing on the Russian women’s team at the World University Games.

Russia beat Mongolia 123-23 at the Games in Kazan, Russia, earlier this week. The 100-point margin of victory matches the Olympic record set in two separate men’s games at the 1948 London Olympics (if exhaustive researching is correct).

The World University Games are what you’d guess, an international multi-sports event (every two years) featuring athletes between the ages of 17 and 24 who are or have been college students in the last year.

It’s not quite the Olympics — chess is one of the “sports” at the World University Games.

Some stats from Russia’s 123-23 win over Mongolia:

• Russia led 31-10 after the first quarter. Mongolia didn’t score in the third quarter.

• More than half of Mongolia’s points came from one player — Solongo Bayasgalan (12 points). Nobody else made more than one basket. 

• Russia’s leading scorer — Lyubov Paskalenko — outscored Mongolia 24-23.

• Mongolia shot 8-for-51 (16 percent) from the field.

• Russia forced 41 Mongolia turnovers, including 29 on steals.

• Mongolia lost by 74 and 73 points in its next two games.

In the 1948 Olympics, Iraq lost to China 125-25 and South Korea 120-20. Neither China nor South Korea made it past the quarterfinals, leading one to wonder what the gold-medal winning Americans would have done against Iraq had they played.

The U.S. men’s basketball team at the World University Games features 2013 first-team All-American Doug McDermott (Creighton) and Final Four Most Outstanding Player Luke Hancock (Louisville).

Their results: wins over United Arab Emirates (140-46), Czech Republic (96-53) and Sweden (83-65) and losses to Australia (93-84) and Canada (94-85). The loss to Canada on Friday knocked the U.S. out of medal contention.

The U.S. women’s team has scored more than 100 points in each of its first four games to make the semifinals. Their margins of victory over Mali, the Czech Republic, Brazil and Sweden were 88, 40, 30 and 31.

They’re led by 2013 first-team All-American Odyssey Sims (Baylor) and second-team All-American Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis (UConn).

Thousands of defective medals recalled at World University Games

Russian Olympic champion positive in Beijing retest, coach reportedly says

Anna Chicherova
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London Olympic high jump champion Anna Chicherova is one of many Russians among 31 athletes overall who tested positive in recent retests of Beijing Olympic samples, according to Russian news agency TASS.

TASS named nine 2008 Olympic medalists among 14 Russian athletes, citing a Russian TV report, including seven in track and field, with Chicherova being the superstar of the group.

“Three days ago, Anna received a notice that her doping sample from the Beijing Olympic tested positive after a re-check, and she called me,” Chicherova’s coach said, according to TASS. “So far, this is at the development stage and this has not yet been finally confirmed. But all are aware of this and are dealing with the issue.”

Last week, the International Olympic Committee said 31 unnamed athletes from 12 nations across six sports failed drug tests in retesting of 454 samples from 2008 using the latest drug-testing methods.

Chicherova, 33, took high jump gold at the London Games and bronze in Beijing. She is one of two track and field athletes to earn an individual-event medal at the last five World Championships and last two Olympics. The other is Usain Bolt.

Chicherova, who has had no previously widespread reported doping history, would be one of Russia’s top Olympic track and field medal hopes in Rio, should the ban on Russian track and field athletes competing be lifted before the Games.

Russia is expected to learn if it will be allowed to send a track and field team to Rio on June 17.

MORE: Russia track and field boss: ’50-60 percent’ chance of Olympics

Katie Zaferes completes U.S. Olympic triathlon team

Katie Zaferes, Gwen Jorgensen, Sarah True
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Katie Zaferes was announced Tuesday as the sixth and final member of the U.S. Olympic triathlon team seeking its first medal since 2004 and first gold medal in the sport’s 16-year Olympic history.

Zaferes, 26, was named to her first Olympic team 10 days after the final Olympic selection race in Yokohama, Japan.

Zaferes comfortably led the qualifying standings for the third and final U.S. Olympic women’s spot behind World champion Gwen Jorgensen and Sarah True, who qualified for Rio on Aug. 2.

USA Triathlon decided not to bypass Zaferes in discretionary selection for a less-accomplished triathlete that would be used as a domestique to improve Jorgensen and/or True’s medal chances in Rio.

Jorgensen, True and Zaferes are the only active U.S. women to make a World Triathlon Series podium, all having done so at least five times in the last two years.

Jorgensen won in Yokohama, with Zaferes placing sixth and True not competing.

The U.S. Olympic men’s triathlon team includes Greg BillingtonBen Kanute and Joe Maloy, all first-time Olympians who have never made a World Series podium.

MORE: Gwen Jorgensen returns to top of podium