Tyson Gay

Tyson Gay, Jamaican Olympic medalists test positive


U.S. 100- and 200- meter champion Tyson Gay tested positive for a banned substance and will miss the world championships, he told The Associated Press.

“I don’t have a sabotage story,” Gay told the AP in a phone interview from Amsterdam. ” … I basically put my trust in someone and was let down.”

Two Jamaican sprinters who are Olympic medalists have also reportedly tested positive. Later reports said former 100 world-record holder Asafa Powell and Olympic 4×100 relay gold medalist Sherone Simpson were among the Jamaicans who tested positive.

Gay fought back sobs in the interview, according to the AP. He wouldn’t reveal the substance that led to the positive test.

He says he was notified by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on Friday that a sample came back positive from an out-of-competition test May 16. He says he will have his “B” sample tested soon.

“It is not the news anyone wanted to hear, at any time, about any athlete,” USATF CEO Max Siegel said in a statement.

“I have to go over everything with USADA first,” Gay told the AP. “I will take whatever punishment I get like a man. I do realize and respect what I put in my body and it is my responsibility.

“I’m going to be honest with USADA, about everything, everybody I’ve been with, every supplement I’ve ever taken, every company I’ve ever dealt with, everything.”

Gay, 30, overcame a series of injuries over the past several years to turn in a healthy and productive season, taking the world lead over Usain Bolt in the 100 meters.

He owned the three fastest times in the 100 this year (9.75, 9.79 and 9.86). The next two fastest men were Carter and Powell and 9.87 and 9.88.

Gay is the American record holder in the 100 with a 9.69 set in 2009. He is a two-time Olympian who finished fourth in the 100 in London and took silver as part of the 4×100 relay.

Gay was the sprint sensation of track and field before Bolt, sweeping the 100, 200 and 4×100 at the 2007 world championships.

His absence at August’s worlds in Moscow opens the door wider for Bolt to take back the world title in the 100 and defend the 200 title.

Yohan Blake, the 2011 world 100 champ after Bolt false started out of the final, is an injury question mark for worlds. There’s also 2012 Olympic bronze medalist Justin Gatlin, who has beaten Bolt this year.

Neither Blake nor Gatlin are in the 200 at worlds though.

Gay’s last meet was July 4, a Diamond League 100 meters in Lausanne, where he beat Powell.

Sasha Cohen revisits Shaun White, 2006 Olympics

‘Olympic Pride, American Prejudice’ film on Berlin 1936 on the way

Jesse Owens
Leave a comment

“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,” a documentary on 18 African-American Olympians at the Berlin 1936 Games, is set to be screened in the spring and be narrated and executive produced by Blair Underwood, according to Variety.

The group of 18, headlined by Jesse Owens, competed in the face of Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler on the brink of World War II.

Trailers for the film are here and here.

From the film’s website:

“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice is a feature length documentary exploring the trials and triumphs of 18 African American Olympians in 1936. Set against the strained and turbulent atmosphere of a racially divided America, which was torn between boycotting Hitler’s Olympics or participating in the Third Reich’s grandest affair, the film follows 16 men and two women before, during and after their heroic turn at the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin. They represented a country that considered them second class citizens and competed in a country that rolled out the red carpet in spite of an undercurrent of Aryan superiority and anti-Semitism. They carried the weight of a race on their shoulders and did the unexpected with grace and dignity.

The athletes experienced things that they were not expecting—applause, warm welcomes, integrated Olympic villages and the respect of their competitors. They were world heroes yet returned home to a short-lived glory. This story is complicated. This story is triumphant but unheralded.”

MORE: See ‘Race’ film poster

Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims’ families detail massacre in documentary

Leave a comment

Family members of the Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims “described the extent of the cruelty” in interviews for “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” an upcoming documentary on the massacre, according to The New York Times.

Eleven Israeli athletes and officials were killed after being taken hostage by a Palestinian group in the athletes’ village nearly 40 years ago, with nine dying in a failed rescue attempt.

In 1992, widows of two of the victims learned details of how the athletes and officials were treated — including via graphic photographs — and recently spoke publicly about it, according to the newspaper.

“What they did is that they cut off his genitals through his underwear and abused him,” Ilana Romano said through a translator of husband Yossef Romano, an Olympic weightlifter, according to the newspaper. “Can you imagine the nine others sitting around tied up? They watched this.”

The documentary “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” announced earlier this year, is set to be released in early 2016. Here’s an interview with one of the film’s producers.

In 2014, it was announced that a $2.3 million memorial in Munich was planned to remember the victims, with the International Olympic Committee contributing $250,000.

At Rio 2016, a moment of remembrance will be held during the Closing Ceremony and a special mourning area will be in the Olympic village to honor those who have died during an Olympic Games.

PHOTOS: Munich 1972 Olympic sites, including massacre site