Tyson Gay

Adidas suspends Tyson Gay’s contract after positive test

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Adidas isn’t waiting for the “B” sample results. The apparel company suspended its contract with U.S. sprinter Tyson Gay less than 24 hours after he revealed he registered a positive drug test.

“We are shocked by these recent allegations, and even if we presume his innocence until proven otherwise, our contract with Tyson is currently suspended,” a company spokesman told Reuters.

Under its agreements with athletes, Adidas has the right to terminate the contract “if the athlete is found guilty of the possession or use of drugs or any other prohibited substance by the relevant governing sports body having jurisdiction over the athlete.”

Gay, 30, the American record holder in the 100 meters, told The Associated Press that he tested positive for a substance he wouldn’t disclose in an out-of-competition test May 16.

Gay told the AP, “I basically put my trust in someone, and I was let down.”

Asked who that someone was, he said, “I can’t really say it. Sometimes a human being naturally, generally trusts somebody. That’s what people do.”

Gay’s “B” sample has yet to be tested, but it usually does not differ from the “A” results.

He could face the standard two-year ban given to athletes who test positive for a first time, though the ban has been known to be reduced depending on the case.

Gay, the U.S. champion in the 100 and the 200, will miss the world championships in August. He’s a two-time Olympian, a 4×100 relay silver medalist in 2012 and swept the 100, 200 and 4×100 at the 2007 world championships before Usain Bolt took over the sport.

“I don’t have a sabotage story,” Gay told the AP. “I don’t have any lies. I don’t have anything to say to make this seem like it was a mistake or it was on USADA’s hands, someone playing games. I don’t have any of those stories.”

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Six more Olympic medalists stripped in Beijing 2008 retests

BEIJING - AUGUST 08:  The Olympic flame is lit by Li Ning, former Olympic gymnast for China, during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing, China.  (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Nine more athletes, including six medal winners, were retroactively disqualified from the 2008 Beijing Olympics on Wednesday after failing retests of their doping samples.

The International Olympic Committee announced the decisions in the latest sanctions imposed on athletes whose stored samples came back positive after being retested with improved methods.

Four athletes were stripped of silver medals and two of bronze medals in weightlifting, wrestling and women’s steeplechase. All six athletes come from former Soviet countries — Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan — and all tested positive for steroids.

The IOC stores doping samples for 10 years to allow them to be reanalyzed when enhanced techniques become available. The IOC recorded a total of 98 positive cases in recent resting of samples from Beijing and the 2012 London Olympics.

Stripped of silver medals Wednesday were freestyle wrestlers Soslan Tigiev of Uzbekistan (66-74 kilogram division) and Taimuraz Tigiyev of Kazakhstan (84-96 kg) and weightlifters Olha Korobka of Ukraine (75 kg) and Andrei Rybakov of Belarus (85 kg).

It’s the second time Tigiev has been stripped of an Olympic medal for doping. He lost his bronze medal from the 74 kg event at the London Games after failing a drug test.

The IOC stripped Beijing bronze medals on Wednesday from Russian steeplechaser Ekaterina Volkova and Belarusian weightlifter Anastasia Novikova (53 kg).

The IOC asked the international weightlifting, wrestling and track and field federations to modify the Olympic results and consider any further sanctions against the athletes. Decisions on reallocating the medals have not been finalized.

The IOC said all six medalists tested positive for the steroid turinabol. Rybakov and Novikova also tested positive for stanozolol. Both substances are traditional steroids with a history dating back decades. The new IOC tests used a technique that could detect the use of those drugs going back weeks and months, rather than just days.

Also disqualified Wednesday were Cuba’s Wilfredo Martinez, who finished fifth in the men’s long jump; Nigerian-born Spaniard Josephine Onyia, who was eliminated in the semifinals of the women’s 100-meter hurdles; and weightlifter Sardar Hasanov of Azerbaijan, who competed but did not finish in the men’s 62-kg division.

The IOC said Hasanov tested positive for turinabol, Martinez for the diuretic and masking agent acetazolamide, and Onyia for the stimulant methylhexanamine.

Last week, the IOC announced that Russian weightlifter Apti Aukhadov had been stripped of his silver medal from the London Olympics on Tuesday after testing positive for turinabol and drostanolone.

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Sweden swimmer Therese Alshammar retires after record 6 Olympics

Therese Alshammar
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Sweden’s Therèse Alshammar, who in Rio became the first woman to swim in six Olympics, will retire after one more domestic meet next week, according to Swedish reports.

Alshammar, 39, cited injury problems, including her back (where she has the word “Diva” tattooed, reportedly to remind her not to be a diva), in preventing her from continuing in the sport, according to Dagnes Nyheter.

She debuted at the 1996 Atlanta Games at age 18, two years after her first world championships.

Alshammar won three Olympic medals, all at the 2000 Sydney Games. She finished second to Dutchwoman Inge de Bruijn in the 50m and 100m freestyles and helped Sweden’s 4x100m free relay to bronze.

Alshammar reportedly became the oldest woman to win a world title at age 33 in 2011 (50m free).

Alshammar carried Sweden’s flag into the Rio Olympic Opening Ceremony and reached the 50m free semifinals, three years after giving birth to son Fred.

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