Lolo Jones

Lolo Jones, Aja Evans present at incident at Lake Placid night club

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Lolo Jones and U.S. bobsled teammate Aja Evans were present during an incident at Roomers Night Club in Lake Placid, N.Y., on Friday night, but Jones did not “knock out” anyone as had been previously said, according to the U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Federation (USBSF).

“There was an incident that occurred on Friday night and our coaches are talking to the athletes and witnesses, which follows USBSF procedures,” a USBSF spokesperson said in an email.

Jones, who has been training in her winter sport at the site of the 1932 and 1980 Olympic Winter Games, was involved in an incident with the stepdaughter of Lake Placid sliding track manager Tony Carlino, according to Fox Sports Radio.

USBSF could not confirm that Carlino’s stepdaughter was involved.

Lake Placid police have not charged anyone and don’t expect to, according to The Associated Press.

Jones is still slated to compete in the upcoming U.S. bobsled push championships in Calgary.

Carlino would not confirm or deny an incident took place when contacted by telephone Sunday. An email to Jones’ agent Tuesday morning was not returned. A voicemail was left with Roomers before its Tuesday business hours.

Six-time Olympic gold medalist swimmer Amy Van Dyken-Rouen spoke of the incident, without naming a source, on Fox Sports Radio on Monday night.

Jones, 30, finished fourth at the 2012 Olympics in the 100-meter hurdles. She was seventh in 2008, leading until hitting the penultimate hurdle.

Jones took up bobsledding last fall and made the U.S. team for the world championships, winning a gold medal in the mixed team event. She returned to track this season but failed to make the worlds team and ended her campaign earlier this month to return to bobsled training.

The U.S. will likely qualify a trio of two-woman bobsled teams for the Olympics. Jones is in the running — though not a favorite after her first season — to be a push athlete on one of the sleds.

Sasha Cohen revisits Shaun White, 2006 Olympics

It’s over: a low-key Games on a far more human scale

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — The 2018 Winter Olympics shivered Sunday to a close, surely defined by cold and wind but destined — just as in Seoul 30 years before — to mark a key chapter in history on the Korean peninsula.

NBCOlympics.com: Sights and Sounds from the 2918 Olympics Closing Ceremony

These Games are likely to be recalled as an inflection point in Olympic history, too. After logistical dramas and more at Rio 2016 and Sochi 2014, the Olympic scene needed a Games at which the venues were built, the buses ran on time, security was subtle, the volunteers were super-friendly — organizationally, everything more or less just worked — and the spotlight shone on the athletes and their stories of inspiration.

That’s what PyeongChang delivered.

A low-key Games on a far more human scale.

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More of best GIFs from PyeongChang Olympics

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The 2018 Winter Games are over, but that doesn’t mean we’ll forget all the amazing heights reached by American athletes. Take a look back at a few of them here with an added twist, powered by Giphy: