Michael Phelps

Jon Hamm jokes about Ryan Lochte, Michael Phelps with Win McMurry, more ESPYs highlights

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The ESPY awards provided a few Olympian storylines, especially among swimmers, on Wednesday night.

Actor and host Jon Hamm praised the U.S. Olympic team in his opening monologue. Well, not all of it was praise.

“Congratulations to the U.S. Olympic team for their absolutely dominant performance at the London Games,” Hamm said. “Women’s gymnastics team gold. Women’s soccer team gold. Men’s basketball team gold.

“The U.S. team was absolutely the story of the Games, winning 104 total medals. Other countries did well, too. Russia took home 82 medals. They only won 77, but they took home 82.

Michael Phelps won four more gold medals, bringing his total to 16 and setting the all-time record for most gold jewelry owned by a non-Italian.

(UPDATE: Phelps, of course, has 18 gold medals, not 16, Mr. Hamm.)

“It was an amazing Olympics. Usain Bolt proved that he is the fastest man on land. Michael Phelps proved that he is the fastest man in the water.

“And Ryan Lochte proved that he is not the sharpest knife in the drawer. … He’s adorable. Lochte won five medals in London, and only two of them were damaged when he tried to find out if there was chocolate inside.”

Watch the full monologue here.

Lochte was not at the Nokia Theater to respond, as he is getting ready for the world championships in Barcelona, but it made Phelps chuckle.

Speaking of Phelps, he was the subject of plenty of chatter, particularly mentioning the woman sitting next to him — Golf Channel’s Win McMurry.

Phelps caddied for McMurry at the PGA Tour Wives Classic at The Players Championship in May. Another public appearance together has led to speculation that they are more than friends, though nothing official has been said yet. Stay tuned.

source: Getty Images

Phelps won two ESPYs — best record-breaking performance (breaking the record for most all-time Olympic medals with 22) and best male Olympic athlete. In an acceptance speech, he thanked retired Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis for helping him end his career the way he wanted to.

Phelps beat out Olympic decathlon champion Ashton Eaton and Lochte for the best male Olympic athlete award. For the record-breaking performance, he won over Drew Brees (most consecutive games with a touchdown pass), Calvin Johnson (most receiving yards in one season) and Abby Wambach (most international goals in a career).

Watch Phelps’ acceptance speech here.

Phelps was also nominated for best male athlete, won by LeBron James.

Best female Olympic athlete went to another swimmer, Missy Franklin, who won five medals (four gold) in London. Franklin, like Lochte, is prepping for worlds in Barcelona.

Franklin beat Fierce Five members Gabby Douglas and Aly Raisman. Franklin and Douglas were also nominated for best female athlete, won by Serena Williams.

source: AP

Raisman was the only U.S. Olympic women’s gymnastics team member who did not attend. She’s in Israel for the Maccabiah Games.

The Fierce Five were nominated for best team, won by the Miami Heat.

Best international athlete went to triple Olympic champion Bolt over tennis player Novak Djokovic, boxer Juan Manuel Marquez and soccer players Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo.

Another swimmer, 12-time Paralympic champion Jessica Long, won best female athlete with a disability. Long won eight medals in London, including five gold.

Paralympic discus champion Jeremy Campbell won best male athlete with a disability.

Lolo Jones asked about night club incident at ESPYs

Katie Ledecky breaks 2 pool records in Stanford home debut

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 09:  Katie Ledecky of the United States celebrates winning gold in the Women's 200m Freestyle Final on Day 4 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)
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Katie Ledecky rewrote the Stanford Avery Aquatic Center pool record book in her first college home meet.

The five-time Olympic gold medalist broke pool records in winning the 200- and 500-yard freestyles in a dual meet with Washington State on Thursday.

Ledecky clocked 1:44.18 in the 200-yard free, which broke Olympic champion teammate Simone Manuel‘s mark of 1:44.34 from last year.

The NCAA Championships winning time from last season was 1:42.42. Ledecky’s personal best in the event is 1:41.04. The American record is 1:39.10 by Missy Franklin.

About 45 minutes later, Ledecky won the 500-yard freestyle in 4:36.43, breaking 2008 Olympian Julia Smit‘s pool record of 4:41.74.

The NCAA Championships winning time from last season was 4:31.33. Ledecky’s personal best is 4:26.58, which doubles as the American record.

Ledecky passed up millions in endorsement dollars to swim collegiately.

The Stanford women’s swim team hosts Texas on Nov. 12, streamed live.

MORE: Phelps, Ledecky lead Golden Goggle nominees

Nick Symmonds hopes to compete 1 more year

Nick Symmonds
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Nick Symmonds, the outspoken two-time U.S. Olympic 800m runner, said he thinks he’s going to try and compete one more season.

“I really want to make one more worlds team,” Symmonds said in a Facebook video Thursday. “I’ve just got to make sure my ankle holds up.”

Symmonds, 32, last raced May 18 and missed the Olympic Trials due to a left ankle injury. He said Thursday that he’s 100 percent healthy and running 40 miles per week.

On June 30, Symmonds said after withdrawing before the Olympic Trials that he “could possibly” compete one more year, but the decision would come down to whether his apparel sponsor, Brooks, wanted to extend his contract beyond 2016.

The 2013 World Championships silver medalist said he had accomplished all of his running goals except for winning an Olympic medal (he was fifth in 2012) and completing a marathon.

In 2015, Symmonds won his sixth U.S. 800m title but missed the world championships due to a contract dispute with USA Track and Field.

Once he retires, Symmonds has said he wants to climb the tallest mountain on every continent.

MORE: Devon Allen: I can still be a 2-sport athlete