Taylor Crosby

Sidney Crosby’s sister wants to play in the Olympics


There may be two Crosbys playing hockey for Canada at an Olympic Winter Games one day.

Sidney Crosby, the golden goal scorer at the Vancouver Olympics, figures to be a Hockey Canada cornerstone for years to come.

His sister, Taylor, 17, hopes to follow in his path. The promising goaltender is attending the IIHF High Performance Camp in Sheffield, England.

She’s going into her senior year at the elite Shattuck-St. Mary’s prep school in Minnesota. Her older brother led it to a national title in 2003.

“Obviously the ultimate goal would be playing in the Olympics, but also I would like to play in (NCAA) Division I hockey and go to school and graduate,” she told IIHF.com in a Q&A titled “The other Crosby.” “I won’t be able to play hockey forever, but I’d like to go as far as I can.”

How good is Taylor? She was among 15 female goaltender prospects invited to a Hockey Canada camp last month. Eight of them were under 18 like her.

“Pretty good size in the net and she uses that size well,” Hockey Canada scout Melody Davidson told The Associated Press in June. “How she’s going to mature and grow as a goalie is what we’re checking in on, and we’ll see how it goes from there.”

Don’t be surprised that Taylor went the goalie route. Her father, Troy, was a netminder drafted by the Montreal Canadiens in 1984.

Taylor’s next goal is to make the Canadian team for the U18 world championships in September and October. She’s surely too young for Sochi, but 2018 is a possibility.

The ages for the three Canadian women’s goalies at the 2010 Olympics were 23, 27 and 31.

“I think from when I first started to play I told myself I wanted to make it to the Olympics,” she said. “But that really was just a goal, aiming high right off the bat. But when I got to see the Canadian women’s team play in Vancouver that was the spark that made me feel like this was something that I really want to work towards. Just the emotion of the games and how happy the team and the fans were … that’s something that drives me even today.”

h/t @OllieW

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Karolyis named in lawsuit against ex-USA Gymnastics doctor

In a July 15, 2008 photo, Dr. Larry Nassar works on the computer after seeing a patient in Michigan. Multiple gymnasts, including a member of the 2000 U.S. women's Olympic team, said they were sexually abused by Nassar, a former longtime doctor for USA Gymnastics, court documents and interviews show. (Becky Shink/Lansing State Journal via AP)
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LOS ANGELES (AP) — A former gymnast on the U.S. women’s national team is the latest athlete to accuse a longtime team doctor of sexual abuse.

But she’s the first to allege renowned husband-and-wife coaches Bela and Martha Karolyi knew about the abuse and did nothing to stop it.

The lawsuit filed Thursday in Los Angeles contends Dr. Larry Nassar repeatedly sexually abused the now-24-year-old gymnast when she was on the team from 2006 to 2011.

It says the Karolyis, and the current and former presidents of USA Gymnastics knew of molestations committed by Nassar before and during his employment, “yet chose to allow him to remain unsupervised,” allowing further abuse.

Nassar’s lawyer and the Karolyis didn’t respond to messages Thursday. Nassar’s lawyer has previously denied abuse allegations by two other gymnasts.

USA Gymnastics is also named in the suit. The Indiana-based governing body denies wrongdoing.

MORE: Michigan State fires Nassar after sexual abuse accusations

Kayla Harrison begins MMA career

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 12:  (BROADCAST - OUT) Judoka Kayla Harrison of the United States poses for a photo with her gold medal on the Today show set on Copacabana Beach on August 12, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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Two-time Olympic judo champion Kayla Harrison has joined mixed martial arts promotion World Series of Fighting as a commentator, brand ambassador and potentially a fighter, but she isn’t 100 percent committed to competing and won’t set a first bout for at least one year.

“All signs point to a yes, but everything has to work out,” Harrison said. “I haven’t booked a fight.”

Harrison, 26 and all but retired from judo, has been asked time and again for years about her interest in pursuing MMA. That’s in part because of former training partner Ronda Rousey‘s overwhelming success after she switched from Olympic judo.

Harrison will serve as a commentator and brand ambassador before potentially getting into MMA competition. Her commentating debut will be at WSOF 34 in New York on Dec. 31 on NBC.

Harrison has taken boxing and jiu-jitsu lessons as far back as 2013, which should boost her MMA potential.

To compete in MMA, Harrison will require a weight cut from her Olympic judo class of 172 pounds.

Rousey competes at 135 pounds, the heaviest women’s weight class in UFC. WSOF, which has no women’s weight classes, plans to develop a women’s program as Harrison readies for a potential debut.

Harrison expects that if she fights, it will be at 145 pounds.

Harrison laughed about people tweeting at her to fight Brazilian Cristiane Justino, a former 145-pound title holder who is set to face Rousey, should Rousey win her comeback fight.

“I’ve never fought MMA before, so my first fight is not going to be for a belt,” Harrison cautioned. “I’m going to MMA 0-0, not as a two-time Olympic champion. People need to remember that.”

Harrison said she last conversed with Rousey one or two months ago. Rousey, a 2008 Olympic bronze medalist, congratulated Harrison on her second gold medal and told Harrison she was available if she needed anything.

Harrison said she might reach out to her former training partner early next year, after Rousey’s comeback fight, to pick her brain about MMA.

“And be like, hey, what do you got for me? Tell me everything,” Harrison joked.

MORE: Ronda Rousey sets comeback fight