Taylor Crosby

Sidney Crosby’s sister wants to play in the Olympics

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There may be two Crosbys playing hockey for Canada at an Olympic Winter Games one day.

Sidney Crosby, the golden goal scorer at the Vancouver Olympics, figures to be a Hockey Canada cornerstone for years to come.

His sister, Taylor, 17, hopes to follow in his path. The promising goaltender is attending the IIHF High Performance Camp in Sheffield, England.

She’s going into her senior year at the elite Shattuck-St. Mary’s prep school in Minnesota. Her older brother led it to a national title in 2003.

“Obviously the ultimate goal would be playing in the Olympics, but also I would like to play in (NCAA) Division I hockey and go to school and graduate,” she told IIHF.com in a Q&A titled “The other Crosby.” “I won’t be able to play hockey forever, but I’d like to go as far as I can.”

How good is Taylor? She was among 15 female goaltender prospects invited to a Hockey Canada camp last month. Eight of them were under 18 like her.

“Pretty good size in the net and she uses that size well,” Hockey Canada scout Melody Davidson told The Associated Press in June. “How she’s going to mature and grow as a goalie is what we’re checking in on, and we’ll see how it goes from there.”

Don’t be surprised that Taylor went the goalie route. Her father, Troy, was a netminder drafted by the Montreal Canadiens in 1984.

Taylor’s next goal is to make the Canadian team for the U18 world championships in September and October. She’s surely too young for Sochi, but 2018 is a possibility.

The ages for the three Canadian women’s goalies at the 2010 Olympics were 23, 27 and 31.

“I think from when I first started to play I told myself I wanted to make it to the Olympics,” she said. “But that really was just a goal, aiming high right off the bat. But when I got to see the Canadian women’s team play in Vancouver that was the spark that made me feel like this was something that I really want to work towards. Just the emotion of the games and how happy the team and the fans were … that’s something that drives me even today.”

h/t @OllieW

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Max Parrot, Julia Marino win Big Air at Fenway Park snowboarding

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Canadian Olympic snowboarder Max Parrot and American Julia Marino swept the first Big Air at Fenway Park events on Thursday night.

Parrot, who finished fifth in the Sochi Olympic slopestyle competition, had the highest-scoring run of all competitors in gusty conditions at the home of the Boston Red Sox.

He tallied a 96.25 in his second of three runs. The combined score of his first two runs — 183.5 — held up so that his last run was a victory lap.

Parrot gained attention in Sochi for being one of two Canadian snowboarders to call out Shaun White for pulling out before the slopestyle competition.

White didn’t compete Thursday. Olympic slopestyle champions Sage Kotsenburg (training crash) and Jamie Anderson (eliminated in qualifying) did compete, but not in the finals.

Big air, which debuts at the Olympics at Pyeongchang 2018, is most like slopestyle of the current Olympic snowboard disciplines. The key difference is that big air runs include one jump, while slopestyle is a course of several jumps and rails.

Earlier, American Julia Marino was the surprise women’s winner at Fenway, tallying a two-run total of 169.25. Marino, 18, was a forerunner who got into the field when U.S. Olympian Ty Walker withdrew.

Riders competed Thursday with wind gusts up to 25 miles per hour, NBC Sports’ Tina Dixon said. Their bibs flapped uncontrollably at the top of the 140-foot-high jump, nearly four times the height of the adjacent Green Monster.

“The wind definitely created a nervous factor for me, and I’m sure all the other riders, too,” Marino, a Connecticut native, said on NBCSN. “It was crazy windy up there. But the fact is the jump itself wasn’t as winded down below. … I’ve been to Boston so many times, and I’ve walked past this ballpark a ton. To be snowboarding here, it’s insane.”

Big Air at Fenway concludes Friday with ski big air, live on NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra at 9 p.m. ET.

MORE: Shaun White explains ‘shock’ of missing X Games

Sage Kotsenburg cracks helmet in Fenway Big Air crash

Sage Kotsenburg
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Olympic snowboard slopestyle champion Sage Kotsenburg crashed in training and suffered a concussion before the finals of the Big Air at Fenway Park in Boston on Thursday evening, according to his Twitter.

The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association said Kotsenburg hit his head in the crash but couldn’t confirm a concussion diagnosis.

Kotsenburg, 22, was to be the headliner of the finals after fellow Olympic slopestyle champion Jamie Anderson was eliminated in earlier qualifying.

Big Air at Fenway was to be Kotsenburg’s final competition of the season, according to Sports Illustrated. He finished 10th in snowboard slopestyle at the Winter X Games two weeks ago.

Kotsenburg has said he would like to compete in slopestyle and big air at the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics, where big air will make its Winter Games debut.

NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra will have coverage of the final day of Big Air at Fenway on Friday for the ski slopestyle finals at 9 p.m. ET.

MORE: Shaun White discusses ‘shock’ of missing X Games