Gracie Gold

Photos surface of Topps 2014 Sochi Olympics trading cards

2 Comments

Topps is again coming out with a special U.S. Olympic trading card set for the Sochi Olympic and Paralympic Games. Images of the cards have been published on hobby websites.

The release date is Nov. 6, according to Cardboard Connection.

Beckett posted a checklist of the 100 base athletes in the set.

Here is the exact list on its site, followed by a few notes and then pictures of some of the cards:

Max Aaron, Figure Skating
Jeremy Abbott, Figure Skating
Eddy Alvarez, Short Track Speed Skating
Jamie Anderson, Snowboarding
Lowell Bailey, Biathlon
Allison Baver, Short Track-Speed Skating
Gretchen Bleiler, Snowboarding
Brittany Bowe, Speedskating
Maddie Bowman, Freeskiing
Erika Brown, Curling
Bobby Brow,n Freeskiing
Tim Burke, Biathlon
Heath Calhoun, Alpine Skiing
J.R. Celski, Short track speedskating
Kelly Clark, Snowboarding
Julia Clukey, Luge
Stacey Cook, Alpine Skiing
Emily Cook, Freestyle Skiing
John Coughlin, Figure Skating
John Daly, Skeleton
Meryl Davis, Figure Skating
Shani Davis, Long Track- Speed Skating
Billy Demong, Nordic Skiing
Patrick Deneen, Freestyle Skiing
Caydee Denney, Figure Skating
Simon Dumont, Freeskiing
Susan Dunklee, Biathlon
Katie Eberling, Bobsled
Grete Eliassen, Freeskiing
Kaityln Farrington, Snowboarding
Jazmine Fenlator, Bobsled
Pete Fenson, Curling
Dylan Ferguson, Freestyle Skiing
Bryan Fletcher, Nordic Combined
Taylor Fletcher, Nordic Combined
Travis Ganong, Alpine Skiing
Christina Gao, Figure Skating
Lana Gehring, Speedskating
Nick Goepper, Freeskiing
Gracie Gold, Figure Skating
Chas Guldemond, Snowboarding
Erin Hamlin, Luge
Keri Herman, Freeskiing
Elena Hight, Snowboarding
Steven Holcomb, Bobsled
Nate Holland, Snowboarding
Lindsey Jacobellis, Snowboarding
Lolo Jones, Bobsled
Hannah Kearney, Freestyle Skiing
Gus Kenworthy, Freeskiing
Hilary Knight, Women’s Hockey
Scott Lago, Snowboarding
Jocelyne Lamoureux, Ice Hocky – Wmn
Monique Lamoureux, Ice Hocky – Wmn
Steve Langton, Bobsled
Ted Ligety, Alpine Skiing
Evan Lysacek, Men’s Figure Skating
Devin Logan, Freeskiing
Julia Mancuso, Alpine Skiing
Chris Mazdzer, Luge
Alice McKennis, Alpine Skiing
Heather McPhie, Freestyle Skiing / Moguls
Elana Meyers, Bobsled
Bode Miller, Alpine Skiing
Andy Newell, Cross Country
Alana Nichols, Alpine Skiing
Steve Nyman, Alpine Skiing
Noelle Picus, Pace Women’s Skeleton
Amy Purdy, Snowboard
Kikkan Randall, Nordic Skiing
Justin Reiter, Snowboarding
Heather Richardson, Long Track- Speed Skating
Rico Roman, Para – Sled Hockey
Laurenne Ross, Alpine Skiing
Maia Shibutani, Figure Skating
Alex Shibutani, Figure Skating
Jessica Smith, Speedskating
Leanne Smith, Alpine Skiing
Evan Strong, Snowboard
Marco Sullivan, Alpine Skiing
John Teller, Freestyle Skiing
Hannah Teter, Snowboarding
Curt Tomasevicz, Bobsled
Katie Uhlaender, Skeleton
Danelle Umstead, Para – Alpine Skiing
Lindsey Van, Nordic Skiing
Louie Vito, Snowboarding
Lindsey Vonn, Alpine Skiing
Ashley Wagner, Figure Skating
Jeremy Wagner, Para – Nordic Skiing
Tom Wallisch, Freeskiing
Seth Wescott, Snowboarding
Charlie White, Figure Skating
David Wise, Freeskiing
Torin Yater-Wallace, Freeskiing
Agnes Zawadzki, Figure Skating
Ashley Caldwell, Freestyle Skiing/Aerials
Bree Schaaf, Bobsled
Jessica Schultz, Curling
Nick Baumgartner, Snowboarding

There are also 11 limited edition autographed cards by Olympic legends Bonnie Blair, Brian Boitano, Dick Button, Jim Craig, Mike Eruzione, Peggy Fleming, Scott Hamilton, Dan JansenNancy Kerrigan, Picabo Street and Kristi Yamaguchi.

There are also special “swatch cards” with game-worn athlete patches inserted into the card. This follows a trend set more than 10 years ago in other sports (game-worn jerseys, game-used bats, etc.)

Perhaps the most recognizable U.S. Winter Olympian is not on that list — Shaun White. Other notables missing are world champion ski jumper Sarah Hendrickson, world champion Alpine skier Mikaela Shiffrin and Amanda Kessel, the reigning NCAA women’s hockey player of the year who scored the game-winning goal against Canada in the final of this year’s worlds.

Yes, Lolo Jones is in the set. Of course, it’s no lock she’s going to make the Olympic team.

On multiple sites, I have seen Noelle Pikus-Pace‘s name misspelled on the checklist. We may have another dreaded error card. There were a few in the London 2012 set.

Topps has not responded to an email asking for more information on the set.

source:

source:

source:

source:

source:

Photo: Lindsey Vonn with men dressed as tigers

Michael Phelps ‘would probably do’ another Olympics if not for injury risk

Leave a comment

Michael Phelps said he would probably swim another Olympic cycle if it wasn’t for the possibility of injury, particularly with his shoulders.

“If you could guarantee me that I would never get injured in four years, and I would never have any problems with my shoulders or anything like that in four years, I’d probably do it again because I had more fun this time around,” Phelps said in a social media video Friday. “But I don’t want to risk that and not be able to spend time with Booms [son Boomer] when he grows up and watch him and be a part of every single part of his life when he gets older and older. So I think that’s something, for me, that I will never put my body through. I won’t take that chance. I think my body is way more important and my family is way more important than going another four years to swim in one more Olympics.”

Phelps’ right shoulder was a particular issue in his comeback for the Rio Olympics. He received two cortisone shots in the months before the Games, leading coach Bob Bowman to say that Phelps was “75 percent” of what he was at the 2008 Beijing Games, according to Sports Illustrated.

(Phelps has said he didn’t compete at 100 percent in Beijing, given an October 2007 broken wrist that interrupted training.)

Phelps reiterated, repeatedly as usual, during the 70-minute video that he would not return to competitive swimming. He still swims recreationally “for peace of mind” and “meditation.”

What about retirement saddens him?

“Not having the chance to represent my country anymore is something bums me out,” Phelps said, particularly hearing the national anthem atop the medal stand.

Phelps has plenty to keep him busy. The most pressing is testifying at a congressional hearing looking at improving the flawed anti-doping system in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

“I have a lot to say,” Phelps said. “To have that opportunity to speak out about my true feelings. I’ve never really, truly been able to do it.”

He began outlining those words Friday and said he had until Sunday to finish a page or a page and a half to present to the subcommittee.

“There are too many people who are cheating, that’s the easiest way to say it,” Phelps said. “Look what happened at the [Rio] Olympics, all the athletes that tested positive that were still allowed to compete. I think that’s wrong, and I think it’s unfair. I think that’s something that needs to clean.”

In Rio, Phelps praised teammate Lilly King‘s criticisms of athletes competing who had previously served doping punishments (such as King’s breaststroke rival, Russian Yuliya Yefimova). Phelps doubts he has ever competed in a clean race.

“I think you’re going to probably see a lot of people speaking out more,” Phelps said in Rio, according to The Associated Press. “I think [King] is right, I think something needs to be done. It’s kind of sad today in sports in general, not just in swimming, there are people who are testing positive who are allowed back in the sport and multiple times. It kind of breaks what sport is meant to be and that’s what pisses me off.”

Phelps said Friday that he hopes to help “clean the sports up so we can get back to why we play sports.”

“I don’t think any athlete should ever have that feeling that somebody else is at an advantage of using a performance-enhancing drug to help them,” he said. “I had these massive dreams and goals of things I wanted to accomplish and achieve, and never were they because I thought I could take an easy way by cheating. I basically just worked as hard as I could and made sure that my body was as prepared as I could possibly make it for every single meet. So I was able to accomplish the goals and dreams that I had. That’s something that I’m going to Congress to talk about.”

Phelps also added in Friday’s video that he hopes another swimmer will come along and break his records, that he was recently knocked out of a poker tournament by his wife and he will be in Budapest for the world championships in July.

Just not as a competitor.

MORE: Ledecky’s latest American record faster than Ryan Lochte at same age

Dawn Harper-Nelson makes tearful plea about banned medication

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND - AUGUST 24: Dawn Harper-Nelson of the United States after winning the Women's 100m Hurdles during the Diamond League at Alexander Stadium on August 24, 2014 in Birmingham, England.  (Photo by Ben Hoskins/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

In a tearful social media video, Olympic 100m hurdles champion Dawn Harper-Nelson said Thursday that she was “afraid for my life” because she’s not allowed to take prescribed blood-pressure medication that is banned by anti-doping authorities.

“I just want to say that this is not fair, that I’m afraid for my life,” she said. “I’m about to go into urgent care, because my blood pressure’s really high again. And USADA [U.S. Anti-Doping Agency] said I can’t take the medicine the doctors giving me. And they’re giving me a new medicine. This is just not OK. My head’s bothering me, my vision’s kind of blurry, and they said my blood pressure is high. I’m scared. People need to be aware, this is not cool.”

Harper-Nelson is serving a three-month ban after previously taking a prescribed medication and failing to learn that it contained a banned substance. She said she was prescribed the medication after being rushed to an emergency room and diagnosed with high blood pressure. The ban ends March 1.

Athletes can request therapeutic use exemptions (TUEs) through USADA if they have an illness or condition that requires the use of medication listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Prohibited List. It’s not clear if Harper-Nelson has requested a TUE for medication containing a banned substance.

Harper-Nelson tested positive for the banned diuretic hydrochlorothiazide, which is on the prohibited list, and related metabolites on Dec. 1, according to USADA:

Harper-Nelson’s explanation that her positive test was caused by a blood pressure medication she was prescribed by a physician to treat hypertension. Harper-Nelson further explained that she made efforts to determine if the medication contained prohibited substances; however, due to using partial search terms, those efforts were unsuccessful.

On Thursday, A USADA official reached out to Harper-Nelson on Twitter. USADA has not commented on the situation.

Harper-Nelson won the 2008 Olympic 100m hurdles title and took silver behind Sally Pearson in 2012. She failed to make the Rio Olympic team, getting eliminated in the Olympic Trials semifinals.

The U.S. trio in Rio swept the medals — Brianna RollinsNia Ali and Kristi Castlin.

MORE: Devon Allen: Football on hold to pursue Olympic gold medal, world record