Gracie Gold

Photos surface of Topps 2014 Sochi Olympics trading cards

2 Comments

Topps is again coming out with a special U.S. Olympic trading card set for the Sochi Olympic and Paralympic Games. Images of the cards have been published on hobby websites.

The release date is Nov. 6, according to Cardboard Connection.

Beckett posted a checklist of the 100 base athletes in the set.

Here is the exact list on its site, followed by a few notes and then pictures of some of the cards:

Max Aaron, Figure Skating
Jeremy Abbott, Figure Skating
Eddy Alvarez, Short Track Speed Skating
Jamie Anderson, Snowboarding
Lowell Bailey, Biathlon
Allison Baver, Short Track-Speed Skating
Gretchen Bleiler, Snowboarding
Brittany Bowe, Speedskating
Maddie Bowman, Freeskiing
Erika Brown, Curling
Bobby Brow,n Freeskiing
Tim Burke, Biathlon
Heath Calhoun, Alpine Skiing
J.R. Celski, Short track speedskating
Kelly Clark, Snowboarding
Julia Clukey, Luge
Stacey Cook, Alpine Skiing
Emily Cook, Freestyle Skiing
John Coughlin, Figure Skating
John Daly, Skeleton
Meryl Davis, Figure Skating
Shani Davis, Long Track- Speed Skating
Billy Demong, Nordic Skiing
Patrick Deneen, Freestyle Skiing
Caydee Denney, Figure Skating
Simon Dumont, Freeskiing
Susan Dunklee, Biathlon
Katie Eberling, Bobsled
Grete Eliassen, Freeskiing
Kaityln Farrington, Snowboarding
Jazmine Fenlator, Bobsled
Pete Fenson, Curling
Dylan Ferguson, Freestyle Skiing
Bryan Fletcher, Nordic Combined
Taylor Fletcher, Nordic Combined
Travis Ganong, Alpine Skiing
Christina Gao, Figure Skating
Lana Gehring, Speedskating
Nick Goepper, Freeskiing
Gracie Gold, Figure Skating
Chas Guldemond, Snowboarding
Erin Hamlin, Luge
Keri Herman, Freeskiing
Elena Hight, Snowboarding
Steven Holcomb, Bobsled
Nate Holland, Snowboarding
Lindsey Jacobellis, Snowboarding
Lolo Jones, Bobsled
Hannah Kearney, Freestyle Skiing
Gus Kenworthy, Freeskiing
Hilary Knight, Women’s Hockey
Scott Lago, Snowboarding
Jocelyne Lamoureux, Ice Hocky – Wmn
Monique Lamoureux, Ice Hocky – Wmn
Steve Langton, Bobsled
Ted Ligety, Alpine Skiing
Evan Lysacek, Men’s Figure Skating
Devin Logan, Freeskiing
Julia Mancuso, Alpine Skiing
Chris Mazdzer, Luge
Alice McKennis, Alpine Skiing
Heather McPhie, Freestyle Skiing / Moguls
Elana Meyers, Bobsled
Bode Miller, Alpine Skiing
Andy Newell, Cross Country
Alana Nichols, Alpine Skiing
Steve Nyman, Alpine Skiing
Noelle Picus, Pace Women’s Skeleton
Amy Purdy, Snowboard
Kikkan Randall, Nordic Skiing
Justin Reiter, Snowboarding
Heather Richardson, Long Track- Speed Skating
Rico Roman, Para – Sled Hockey
Laurenne Ross, Alpine Skiing
Maia Shibutani, Figure Skating
Alex Shibutani, Figure Skating
Jessica Smith, Speedskating
Leanne Smith, Alpine Skiing
Evan Strong, Snowboard
Marco Sullivan, Alpine Skiing
John Teller, Freestyle Skiing
Hannah Teter, Snowboarding
Curt Tomasevicz, Bobsled
Katie Uhlaender, Skeleton
Danelle Umstead, Para – Alpine Skiing
Lindsey Van, Nordic Skiing
Louie Vito, Snowboarding
Lindsey Vonn, Alpine Skiing
Ashley Wagner, Figure Skating
Jeremy Wagner, Para – Nordic Skiing
Tom Wallisch, Freeskiing
Seth Wescott, Snowboarding
Charlie White, Figure Skating
David Wise, Freeskiing
Torin Yater-Wallace, Freeskiing
Agnes Zawadzki, Figure Skating
Ashley Caldwell, Freestyle Skiing/Aerials
Bree Schaaf, Bobsled
Jessica Schultz, Curling
Nick Baumgartner, Snowboarding

There are also 11 limited edition autographed cards by Olympic legends Bonnie Blair, Brian Boitano, Dick Button, Jim Craig, Mike Eruzione, Peggy Fleming, Scott Hamilton, Dan JansenNancy Kerrigan, Picabo Street and Kristi Yamaguchi.

There are also special “swatch cards” with game-worn athlete patches inserted into the card. This follows a trend set more than 10 years ago in other sports (game-worn jerseys, game-used bats, etc.)

Perhaps the most recognizable U.S. Winter Olympian is not on that list — Shaun White. Other notables missing are world champion ski jumper Sarah Hendrickson, world champion Alpine skier Mikaela Shiffrin and Amanda Kessel, the reigning NCAA women’s hockey player of the year who scored the game-winning goal against Canada in the final of this year’s worlds.

Yes, Lolo Jones is in the set. Of course, it’s no lock she’s going to make the Olympic team.

On multiple sites, I have seen Noelle Pikus-Pace‘s name misspelled on the checklist. We may have another dreaded error card. There were a few in the London 2012 set.

Topps has not responded to an email asking for more information on the set.

source:

source:

source:

source:

source:

Photo: Lindsey Vonn with men dressed as tigers

Lance Armstrong lawyers want Greg LeMond, Betsy Andreu excluded from trial

AP
Leave a comment

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Lance Armstrong’s $100 million fraud trial is months away, yet his fight with the government and former teammate-turned-rival Floyd Landis is heating up.

Armstrong, who was stripped of his 2000 Olympic bronze medal and seven Tour de France titles for doping, wants to bar potential testimony and evidence from some of his most dogged critics.

That includes the blistering U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report that led to his downfall and former Tour de France champion Greg LeMond, who now stands as the only American to have officially won the race.

Landis, who tipped investigators to Armstrong’s cheating back in 2010, wants to prevent Armstrong from telling jurors about his own doping history and motivation to file a lawsuit that could put more than $20 million in his pocket.

Trial is scheduled for November in federal court in Washington, and lawyers for both sides recently filed a series of motions asking U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper to exclude some key evidence.

Landis initially sued Armstrong in 2010, alleging Armstrong violated the cycling team’s U.S. Postal Service contract by using performance-enhancing drugs. The government joined in 2013 after Armstrong admitted using steroids and other banned performance-enhancing drugs and techniques to win the Tour de France seven times and become the world’s dominant bicycle racer from 1999-2005. The government wants to recover more than $30 million the Postal Service paid to sponsor Armstrong’s team and will seek triple damages.

Armstrong’s cheating was exposed and detailed in a 2012 U.S Anti-Doping Agency report that included sworn testimony from several of his former teammates. He was stripped of his Tour de France victories, banned from competition and has paid an estimated $20 million to settle various lawsuits.

Armstrong’s lawyers now call the USADA report “inadmissible hearsay” for the federal case and say it was written to satisfy the motives of an agency out to get him. They notably object to the report’s summation that Armstrong led the most “most sophisticated” doping program in sports history.

Even if the report is blocked, Armstrong has admitted and provided sworn testimony about his performance-enhancing drug use.

Armstrong also wants to block testimony from Betsy Andreu, the wife of former Armstrong teammate Frankie Andreu. She was one of the first to provide sworn testimony about Armstrong’s drug use in a 2005 lawsuit, and has been a prominent critic of Armstrong’s past efforts to intimidate anyone who raised the specter of his doping. Armstrong’s lawyers call her a publicity seeker who blames Armstrong for her husband not having a better career.

Betsy Andreu said she hasn’t done TV interviews about Armstrong since 2013 and turned down a book deal.

“It’s been well established that Lance will stop at nothing to discredit my husband and me because of our uncompromising integrity,” she told The Associated Press. “Lance tried to shut me up by bullying me to the point of breaking me. He didn’t succeed then, he will not succeed now.”

LeMond’s presence at trial could be explosive as he has clashed fiercely with both Armstrong and Landis in the past. Armstrong’s lawyers want him out.

“While LeMond is well-versed in the prevalence of doping throughout the sport during the relevant time period (1997-2004) and still owns the record for the fastest time trial in Tour de France history, he has no personal knowledge regarding Armstrong, the USPS sponsorship agreement, or invoices submitted for sponsorship payments,” Armstrong’s lawyers wrote.

Kathy LeMond told the AP her husband has intimate knowledge of Postal Service contracting in the mid-1990s and the expectation by the government that teams were expected to be clean. LeMond was retired when the same group that organized Armstrong’s team first approached him about having a role in a Postal Service team, then froze him out, she said.

“They asked him to use his name to try to get a U.S.-based team,” Kathy LeMond said. “We have those documents … We gave it all to the Justice Department.”

The government wants the judge to block some of Armstrong’s evidence as well, including two reports commissioned by the Postal Service during the team sponsorship. Those reports claim the sponsorship was worth more than $100 million in global exposure, leading Armstrong to claim he owes the government nothing. The government argues those reports should be disallowed as “hearsay” that lack expert testimony to support them.

The government also wants to prevent him from attacking Landis’ character and motivation. Landis’ 2006 Tour de France victory was stripped after he was caught using synthetic testosterone. He initially claimed innocence and asked the public to finance his defense. Landis was later prosecuted for fraud and paid back more than $475,000.

As the whistleblower against Armstrong, Landis stands to pocket up to 25 percent of any damages awarded.

“Armstrong should not be allowed to deflect the jury’s attention from his own misdeeds by putting Landis on trial and introducing evidence to cast him in a bad light,” the government wrote.

Dallas attorney Matthew Orwig, a former federal prosecutor, said whistleblowers are “rarely totally pure” and attacking their character is a common legal tactic.

Even though Landis filed the initial lawsuit, the government has said it doesn’t plan to call him as a witness. The government should consider presenting Landis’ background instead of letting Armstrong do it, Orwig said.

“Let them hear it from you instead of the other side,” Orwig said. “It seems to inevitably come out.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Cycling chief during Armstrong era dies

South Korea president calls for North Korea at PyeongChang Olympics

AP
Leave a comment

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea President Moon Jae-in said Saturday he hopes to see North Korean athletes at next year’s Winter Olympics in South Korea to ease tensions over the North’s nuclear program.

Moon made the comments during the opening ceremony of the world taekwondo championships in the South Korean town of Muju, where a North Korean delegation led by International Olympic Committee member Chang Ung was also present.

The championships, which will feature a performance by the North Korean taekwondo demonstration team, mark the first sports exchange between the Koreas since the liberal Moon took office in May.

Moon has expressed a desire to use the Feb. 9-25 Pyeongchang Olympics to reach out to North Korea, with relations between the two at their lowest point in decades. During his stay in the South, Chang is expected to meet South Korean officials to discuss cooperation at the Winter Olympics.

“If North Korean athletes participate in the Pyeongchang Olympics, I think it would greatly contribute in realizing Olympic values, which are about bringing humanity together and promoting world peace,” said Moon.

He recalled key moments in sports diplomacy between the Koreas, including when they sent unified teams to the world table tennis and youth soccer championships in 1991, and their athletes marching together during the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2000 Sydney Olympics.

Participation in Pyeongchang could “provide a turning point for the reconciliation between the South and North,” Moon said. “I sincerely ask the IOC and (IOC member) Chang who are here with us today for their strong consideration and cooperation.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: South Korea opens up DMZ for Olympics