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FINA adds mixed-gender swimming relays; which countries would fare best?

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Swimming’s world governing body approved mixed-gender relay events Thursday. They will be in place for a major international meet for the first time at the 2014 short-course world championships, according to reports.

That would presumably mean relays with two men and two women per country could be on the program at the following world championships in 2015 in Kazan, Russia. FINA has said mixed relays could be added to the Olympics at some point, but that step has not been taken yet.

We’ve already seen mixed relays at World Cup events, the Youth Olympics and, famously, at the Duel in the Pool meet between the U.S. and international stars.

Australian Olympic champion Libby Trickett went faster than the women’s 100-meter freestyle world record in the leadoff leg of the 4×100 free relay at the 2007 Duel in the Pool, but it didn’t go into the record books because she did it swimming against Michael Phelps.

So, if mixed relays were held, say, at next week’s world championships, which countries would be favored? Let’s do some math.

Based on FINA’s world leaders for this year (which have been known to miss a top time or two in the past), here’s how everybody would add up with flat times with two men and two women per relay.

4×100 free relay
Gold: Australia (3:22.15) — Cate Campbell (52.83), Bronte Campbell (53.72), James Magnussen (47.53), Cameron McEvoy (48.07).

Silver: USA (3:23.58) — Missy Franklin (53.43), Shannon Vreeland (53.83), Nathan Adrian (48.08), Jimmy Feigen (48.24).

Bronze: Russia (3:24.5) — Veronika Popova (54.12), Maria Baklakova (54.78), Vladimir Morozov (47.62), Andrey Grechin (47.08).

4×200 free relay
Gold: France (7:23.92) — Camille Muffat (1:55.48), Charlotte Bonnet (1:56.66), Yannick Agnel (1:45.48), Jeremy Stravius (1:45.61).

Silver: Australia (7:24.53) — Bronte Barratt (1:56.05), Kylie Palmer (1:56.66), Thomas Fraser-Holmes (1:45.79), Cameron McEvoy (1:46.03).

Bronze: USA (7:24.71) — Missy Franklin (1:55.56), Katie Ledecky (1:56.93), Ryan Lochte (1:45.97), Conor Dwyer (1:46.25).

4×100 medley relay
Gold: Australia (3:42.93) — Emily Seebohm (59.17), Christian Sprenger (59.05), Alicia Coutts (57.18), James Magnussen (47.53).

Silver: USA (3:44.05) — David Plummer (53.10), Kevin Cordes (59.99), Dana Vollmer (57.53), Missy Franklin (53.43).

Bronze: Russia (3:44.46) — Anastasia Zueva (59.83), Yulia Efimova (1:05.48), Evgeny Korotyshkin (51.53), Vladimir Morozov (47.62).

Usain Bolt: I know I’m clean

Ida Keeling, 100 years old, sets world record at Penn Relays (video)

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Ida Keeling electrified the Penn Relays crowd with her 100-meter dash in 1 minute, 17.33 seconds on Saturday afternoon.

Keeling set a world record for fastest 100m by a woman 100 years and older. There is no data on USA Track and Field and masters athletics websites for a previous record holder.

“I’ll be 101 in a couple of weeks,” Keeling pointed out to NBC Sports’ Carolyn Manno after the race, a mixed-gender event for athletes 80 and older. “I’ve never seen nothing like this crowd. Maybe that’s what the excitement was.”

Keeling’s advice?

“Love yourself, do what you have to do and what you want to do,” she said. “Eat for nutrition, not for taste. And exercise at least once a day.”

More on Keeling is here.

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U.S. sprinters past, present trade relay barbs

Justin Gatlin
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PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The only loss for the Americans at the Penn Relays came in the men’s 4x100m, as the U.S. team bobbled its victory away on a bad baton handoff between Tyson Gay and Isiah Young for the final leg, which led to a disqualification.

Mike Rodgers and Justin Gatlin gave the Americans an early lead in the race, and things were moving along well during Gay’s third leg. But the muffed handoff for the final leg cost the Americans. Both the winning Jamaican squad and the second American team surpassed them.

Young finished third, but the team was disqualified because the handoff occurred outside the pass zone. The second U.S. team of Sean McLean, Wallace Spearman, Calesio Newman and Remontay McLain finished in 39.02.

The mistake led to some inflammatory comments from U.S. great Leroy Burrell about continued problems with handoffs by U.S. relay teams.

“Well, I think we’ve got to put our team together a little earlier, possibly,” Burrell said in a television interview. “I think, we’ve had the same coaches working with these guys for many years, and we’ve had failure after failure. So it’s possible that, you know, it might be time for a bit of a regime change with the leadership.

“I think the athletes have to be the catalysts that make that happen. There’s no reason why we shouldn’t be able to get the stick around. I saw thousands of relay teams yesterday — maybe not thousands, but hundreds of relay teams get it around. But the professionals can’t. That’s just not good for our sport.”

Rodgers didn’t take kindly to those remarks.

“People keep pointing their fingers and downing us, but nobody has ever tried to come out there and help us,” he said. “Nobody from the past. Not Carl [Lewis] or Leroy. They haven’t been out there. I can’t really respect their opinions because they’re supposed to be leaders in our sport and in the USA, and they’re not coming out there to drop some knowledge on us, so I don’t care what they have to say.”

Lewis criticized U.S. relays in March.

Gatlin was equally critical of Burrell.

“I’m tired of people who have been part of Team USA take shots at Team USA,” Gatlin said. “To put us in the same boat as high schoolers is insulting.”

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