Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt driven around London Olympic Stadium in a rocket

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We marveled when Oslo meet organizers introduced Usain Bolt in a race car last month. It appears the London Anniversary Games did one better. Bolt came out in a rocket at the Olympic Stadium on Friday.

Bolt’s return to the site of his triple gold performance in 2012 begins with a 100 meters at 4:48 p.m. ET on Friday. He’s also expected to run in the 4×100 relay Saturday.

Bolt: ‘I know I’m clean’

Tessa Virtue, Scott Moir return to top with Grand Prix Final win

Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada perform during the ice dance event at the NHK Trophy figure skating competition in Sapporo, northern Japan, Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016. Olympic and world champions Virtue and Moir set a record score to win the ice dance event at the NHK Trophy on Sunday and qualify for the figure skating Grand Prix Final. (Hiroki Yamauchi/Kyodo News via AP)
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Canadians Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir stamped their comeback to the top of ice dance, nearly five years since their last major title, by winning their first Grand Prix Final in record fashion Saturday.

The 2010 Olympic champions, back this season after a two-year break from competition, knocked off the two-time reigning world champions from France, training partners Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron, on French ice in Marseille.

“At the start of the season our goal was really to qualify for this event,” said Virtue, who with Moir earned four Grand Prix Final silver medals before this week’s breakthrough. “After competing at Grand Prix Final five times, it feels nice to finally get the win.”

Virtue and Moir tallied 197.22 points, the highest total ice dance score under a judging system implemented in 2005. The French were 4.11 points behind, followed by U.S. champions Maia and Alex Shibutani in third.

Virtue and Moir completed a perfect fall season in a sport, and a discipline, where a climb back to the top after ceding the throne can be arduous.

Virtue and Moir won the 2010 Olympic title in Vancouver, then swapped world titles with then-training partners Meryl Davis and Charlie White in 2011 and 2012 before being supplanted by the Americans on the Olympic stage in Sochi.

Moir kissed the ice after their final performance in Russia, just as he did in Vancouver, but it was not a kiss goodbye to competition. The couple announced their comeback last Feb. 20.

“We probably have one more shot at it [the Olympics], so we have to take advantage of it,” Moir said then, following up his reported May 2015 comments, “We’re not coming back unless it’s to become Olympic champions again.”

Davis and White have not skated since Sochi (yet haven’t retired), but a new power ascended in ice dance the last two seasons.

In 2015, Papadakis and Cizeron became the youngest world champions in 40 years. They repeated last season, impressively, after Papadakis suffered a concussion in a practice fall seven months earlier.

When Virtue and Moir came back, they joined Papadakis and Cizeron’s training base in Montreal.

“I think we have to earn that term to be associated as rivals to Gabriella and Guillaume,” Virtue reportedly said early this season. “We are not quite there yet for sure, but they have taken the ice dance world to an entirely different level in the last few years.”

Virtue and Moir beat Papadakis and Cizeron by nine points at NHK Trophy two weeks ago, with a world-record total, and scored even better in Marseille.

“We just wanted to be in the mix [this season],” Moir said. “The state of ice dance has come up quite a ways. And this is not something that we expected. Now we know that this doesn’t make it easy for us, it makes it a lot harder. … Now we have a huge target on our backs. … Our workload just multiplied by 10.”

Now, Virtue and Moir may be on their way to a rare feat in 2018 — to win an Olympics, see somebody else win an Olympics, and then regain the gold. Across all figure skating disciplines, only Russian pairs Yekaterina Gordeeva and Sergey Grinkov have done this.

After their win in Marseille, Moir was asked about returning to the Grand Prix Final for a seventh time next season.

“There are a couple of other goals we’re looking for other than the longevity award,” he said.

The Grand Prix Final concludes Saturday with the women’s and men’s free skates (schedule here). NBCSN will air coverage Sunday from 8:30-11 p.m. ET.

MORE: Javier Fernandez builds toward last Olympic chance

Ice Dance Results
GOLD: Tessa Virtue/Scott Moir (CAN) — 197.22
SILVER: Gabriella Papadakis/Guillaume Cizeron (FRA) — 192.81
BRONZE: Maia Shibutani/Alex Shibutani (USA) — 189.60
4. Yekaterina Bobrova/Dmitry Soloviyev (RUS) — 181.95
5. Madison Hubbell/Zachary Donohue (USA) — 179.59
6. Madison Chock/Evan Bates (USA) — 179.32

Mikaela Shiffrin’s costly mistakes mean missed opportunity

United States' Mikaela Shiffrin gets to the finish area after completing an alpine ski, women's World Cup giant slalom, in Sestriere, Italy, Saturday, Dec. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Marco Trovati)
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Mikaela Shiffrin paced to the starting gate of her second giant slalom run in Sestriere, Italy, as the final racer on Saturday. The leader after the first run, the slalom ace could win her first World Cup giant slalom outright.

What’s more, Shiffrin’s rival for the World Cup overall title, Swiss Lara Gut, had an unsatisfactory descent minutes earlier and sat third.

But Shiffrin neither notched the benchmark victory nor padded her standings lead on Gut. She made mistakes near the top of the course, critically needing to correct swiftly to avoid missing a gate.

Shiffrin appeared to know the afternoon’s hopes were lost when she crossed the finish line. She didn’t need to check the scoreboard at the 2006 Olympic venue.

Sixth place, 1.04 seconds behind French winner Tessa Worley. Shiffrin was .05 ahead of Worley after the first run.

FULL RESULTS | RACE REPLAY

Shiffrin has won 22 World Cup races before the age of 22, 21 of them in slalom and one shared giant slalom victory from two years ago. A solo GS win has eluded her, amid a trio of runners-up, two thirds and a string of eight straight top-10s earlier in her young career.

Shiffrin’s standings lead for the World Cup overall title was cut from 28 points to eight points over Gut, last year’s overall winner.

Though Shiffrin figures to add to the lead Sunday, she needs to make the most out of every slalom and giant slalom. Gut’s best races are downhill and super-G, disciplines that litter the second half of the season once the calendar turns over.

On Sunday in Sestriere, Shiffrin hopes to win her 11th straight World Cup slalom (not counting the five she missed due to injury last season).

The record for any women’s World Cup discipline is 12 straight wins, held by Swiss Vreni Schneider, also in slalom.

Olympic champions Lindsey VonnAnna Veith and Julia Mancuso have yet to make their season debuts, all out due to injuries.

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