Scott Blackmun

USOC CEO: ‘It’s our strong desire that our athletes comply with the laws of every nation’

5 Comments

U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun is waiting on clarification on Russia’s anti-gay law, like the International Olympic Committee is, but would like to see U.S. athletes comply with any laws in place.

“It’s our strong desire that our athletes comply with the laws of every nation that we visit,” Blackmun told R-Sport on Wednesday. “This law is no different.”

The Russian news agency asked Blackmun his interpretation of the law.

“We’re looking to the IOC for some leadership in this issue,” Blackmun said. “They have been in discussions with the Russian authorities, so we’re awaiting for some clarification from them.

“Our job, first and foremost, is to make sure that our athletes are prepared to compete and aren’t distracted while they’re here. We’re a sports organization, and we’ll leave the diplomacy on the legal issues to the diplomats, and we’re not going to get involved.”

Asked about involvement if an athlete makes a protest, Blackmun responded:

“You can’t judge in advance what you’re going to do. Each Games is different. The athletes are always going into countries with laws different than his or her own country. They’re going to agree with those laws in some ways, they’re going to disagree with those laws in other ways.”

On Monday, the Russian Interior Ministry said its employees will “act in the framework” of a law banning the promotion of “non-traditional sexual relations” toward minors “during the Olympics as well as during any other time.”

It also said fears of sexually-based discrimination of Olympic athletes and guests are “absolutely groundless and farfetched.”

The Russian Interior Ministry controls the country’s police force, according to R-Sport. Here are the full comments made to Russian news agency Interfax:

“The law mentioned above has come into effect and operates in Russia.”

“Due to this, employees of the Russian Interior Ministry will act in the framework of the Russian law in general and the law protecting children from harmful information in particular during the Olympics as well as during any other time.

“This law applies to individuals “whose goal is to provoke underage persons to get involved in non-traditional sexual relations.

“Law enforcement authorities will take measures against individuals performing such actions in accordance with the Russian law.

“Law enforcement authorities can not have any questions of people of non-traditional sexual orientation not committing such actions, not holding any provocations and peacefully participating with everyone in the Olympic events.”

“Thus, fears of rights violations of representatives of non-traditional sexual orientation, preventing them from participating in the Olympics and sexually-based discrimination of Olympic athletes and guests are absolutely groundless and farfetched.”

The head of Russia’s National Olympic Committee, Alexander Zhukov, agreed with the interior ministry’s statement, according to R-Sport.

“If a person does not put across his views in the presence of children, no measures against him can be taken,” Zhukov said Monday. “People of nontraditional sexual orientations can take part in the competitions and all other events at the Games unhindered, without any fear for their safety whatsoever.”

The IOC has said the last two weeks that it “received a number of assurances from the highest level of government in Russia that the legislation will not affect those attending or taking part in the Games.”

On Friday, IOC president Jacques Rogge said the Russian government gave the IOC assurances about the law Thursday but more clarifications were required. Rogge cited translation issues.

Here’s how Russian news outlet RT.com explained the law:

The legislation “prohibiting propaganda of homosexuality to minors” was enacted on June 30, when it was signed by president Putin. It’s an amendment to the law “On protecting children from information harmful to their health and development”.

If found guilty of promoting “non-traditional sexual relationships”, individuals could face fines of up to 5,000 rubles (US$150). The sum would be multiplied by 10 if those individuals appear to be civil servants. Organizations, meanwhile, would have to pay 1 million rubles (about $30,000) or have their activity suspended for 90 days if they do not comply with the fresh amendment.

Bolt photographer calls image ‘pure luck’

Syria-born Olympian takes advocacy role at U.N. refugee agency

Getty Images
Leave a comment

GENEVA (AP) — The U.N. refugee agency has chosen as a goodwill ambassador a Syrian teenage girl who helped save a boat carrying fellow refugees and later became an Olympic swimmer.

Yusra Mardini was appointed as UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador on Thursday, joining other notables like actress Cate Blanchett and author Khaled Hosseini in the unpaid advocacy role.

UNHCR chief Filippo Grandi said Mardini “represents the hopes, the fears and the incredible potential of the more than 10 million young refugees around the globe.”

Mardini and her sister Sarah jumped overboard and swam for hours alongside their overloaded boat to reach Greece from Turkey in 2015.

She swam on the first Refugee Olympic team in Rio last year and has discussed refugees’ challenges with leaders like Pope Francis and President Barack Obama.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Serena Williams comments on 2020 Olympics during pregnancy

Rafael Nadal recreates famous 1992 Olympic cauldron lighting

AP
Leave a comment

Rafael Nadal, owner of two Olympic gold medals, recently parroted arguably the most famous moment in Spanish Olympic history.

Nadal and Marc Lopez, the 2016 Olympic doubles champions, took up bows and arrows and joined archer Antonio Rebollo on Monday at the 1992 Barcelona Olympic Stadium. It brought back memories of Rebollo’s unforgettable cauldron lighting from the only Olympics held in Spain.

Nadal is in Barcelona for an ATP Tour event as he prepares to vie for a 10th French Open title next month.

Rebollo, now 61 years old, was one of 200 hundred archers considered to light the cauldron in 1992. He learned that he was chosen for the role over four other finalists two hours ahead of time, according to an NBC Olympics profile in 1996.

The cauldron would be 195 feet away. Fearing Rebollo would miss the target, organizers instructed him to fire his arrow beyond the stadium walls. As the arrow soared, a technician lit the natural gas flame with a remote control.

The illusion worked. The true story wasn’t revealed for another 20 years.

“There were no fears,” Rebollo, a Barcelona native who contracted polio at age 8, told NBC two decades ago. “I was practically a robot. I focused on my positioning and reaching the target. That was all. … My feelings were taken from the people who described to me how they saw it. What they felt, their emotions, their cries. This is what made me realize what the moment actually meant.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Serena Williams comments on 2020 Olympics during pregnancy