Scott Blackmun

USOC CEO: ‘It’s our strong desire that our athletes comply with the laws of every nation’

5 Comments

U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun is waiting on clarification on Russia’s anti-gay law, like the International Olympic Committee is, but would like to see U.S. athletes comply with any laws in place.

“It’s our strong desire that our athletes comply with the laws of every nation that we visit,” Blackmun told R-Sport on Wednesday. “This law is no different.”

The Russian news agency asked Blackmun his interpretation of the law.

“We’re looking to the IOC for some leadership in this issue,” Blackmun said. “They have been in discussions with the Russian authorities, so we’re awaiting for some clarification from them.

“Our job, first and foremost, is to make sure that our athletes are prepared to compete and aren’t distracted while they’re here. We’re a sports organization, and we’ll leave the diplomacy on the legal issues to the diplomats, and we’re not going to get involved.”

Asked about involvement if an athlete makes a protest, Blackmun responded:

“You can’t judge in advance what you’re going to do. Each Games is different. The athletes are always going into countries with laws different than his or her own country. They’re going to agree with those laws in some ways, they’re going to disagree with those laws in other ways.”

On Monday, the Russian Interior Ministry said its employees will “act in the framework” of a law banning the promotion of “non-traditional sexual relations” toward minors “during the Olympics as well as during any other time.”

It also said fears of sexually-based discrimination of Olympic athletes and guests are “absolutely groundless and farfetched.”

The Russian Interior Ministry controls the country’s police force, according to R-Sport. Here are the full comments made to Russian news agency Interfax:

“The law mentioned above has come into effect and operates in Russia.”

“Due to this, employees of the Russian Interior Ministry will act in the framework of the Russian law in general and the law protecting children from harmful information in particular during the Olympics as well as during any other time.

“This law applies to individuals “whose goal is to provoke underage persons to get involved in non-traditional sexual relations.

“Law enforcement authorities will take measures against individuals performing such actions in accordance with the Russian law.

“Law enforcement authorities can not have any questions of people of non-traditional sexual orientation not committing such actions, not holding any provocations and peacefully participating with everyone in the Olympic events.”

“Thus, fears of rights violations of representatives of non-traditional sexual orientation, preventing them from participating in the Olympics and sexually-based discrimination of Olympic athletes and guests are absolutely groundless and farfetched.”

The head of Russia’s National Olympic Committee, Alexander Zhukov, agreed with the interior ministry’s statement, according to R-Sport.

“If a person does not put across his views in the presence of children, no measures against him can be taken,” Zhukov said Monday. “People of nontraditional sexual orientations can take part in the competitions and all other events at the Games unhindered, without any fear for their safety whatsoever.”

The IOC has said the last two weeks that it “received a number of assurances from the highest level of government in Russia that the legislation will not affect those attending or taking part in the Games.”

On Friday, IOC president Jacques Rogge said the Russian government gave the IOC assurances about the law Thursday but more clarifications were required. Rogge cited translation issues.

Here’s how Russian news outlet RT.com explained the law:

The legislation “prohibiting propaganda of homosexuality to minors” was enacted on June 30, when it was signed by president Putin. It’s an amendment to the law “On protecting children from information harmful to their health and development”.

If found guilty of promoting “non-traditional sexual relationships”, individuals could face fines of up to 5,000 rubles (US$150). The sum would be multiplied by 10 if those individuals appear to be civil servants. Organizations, meanwhile, would have to pay 1 million rubles (about $30,000) or have their activity suspended for 90 days if they do not comply with the fresh amendment.

Bolt photographer calls image ‘pure luck’

World Wrestling Championships broadcast schedule

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Olympic champions Kyle SnyderHelen Maroulis and Jordan Burroughs headline the U.S. team for the world wrestling championships, with daily live coverage on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA all next week.

Olympic Channel coverage of medal rounds will go from 1-3:30 p.m. ET from Monday through Saturday. NBCSN will air additional recap broadcasts.

Snyder and Burroughs will wrestle in their respective weight classes on Saturday. Maroulis goes on Wednesday. J’den Cox, a Rio bronze medalist, is scheduled Friday.

Snyder could have the most salivating matchup of all if he and Russian Abdulrashid Sadulayev meet in the 97kg bracket. Snyder, 21, owned 97kg the last two years, becoming the youngest American wrestler to win a world title in 2015 and an Olympic title in 2016.

Sadulayev, also 21, is undefeated at the senior international level since November 2013. He won the 2014 and 2015 World titles and 2016 Olympic gold at 86kg. This year, he moved up to 97kg to potentially meet Snyder for the first time.

Maroulis won the first U.S. Olympic women’s wrestling gold medal in Rio, upsetting three-time Olympic champion Saori Yoshida of Japan at 53kg. Yoshida isn’t entered at worlds, not that it matters for Maroulis, who moved up to 58kg.

Then there’s Burroughs, who is looking to make up for a medal-less effort in Rio. The 2012 Olympic champion will go for a fourth world title in a 74kg bracket that lacks the Rio gold and silver medalists.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Snyder savors Russian Tank showdown

Day Time (ET) Network Finals
Monday 1-3:30 p.m. Olympic Channel | STREAM Greco-Roman 71, 75, 85, 98
Tuesday 1-3:30 p.m. Olympic Channel | STREAM Greco-Roman 59, 66, 80, 130
Wednesday 1-3:30 p.m. Olympic Channel | STREAM Women 55, 58, 63, 75
Wednesday 3:30-5 p.m.* NBCSN Recap
Thursday 1-3:30 p.m. Olympic Channel | STREAM Women 48, 53, 60, 69
Thursday 4-5 p.m.* NBCSN Recap
Friday 1-3:30 p.m. Olympic Channel | STREAM Men Freestyle 57, 61, 86, 125
Friday 7-9 p.m.* NBCSN Recap
Saturday 1-3:30 p.m. Olympic Channel | STREAM Men Freestyle 65, 70, 74, 97
Sunday 3-5 p.m.* NBCSN Recap

*Tape delay

Marcel Hirscher set to miss start of Alpine skiing season

AP
Leave a comment

Marcel Hirscher, the world’s best Alpine skier, likely will not race until December, missing the start of the World Cup schedule in the Olympic season.

The Austrian is likely out 12 to 15 weeks after breaking his left ankle Thursday, according to the Austria Press Agency, which quoted Hirscher’s doctor.

Hirscher, the winner of a record six straight World Cup overall titles, is set to miss the season-opening giant slalom in Soelden, Austria, on Oct. 29. He’s likely out of the following race, a Nov. 12 slalom in Levi, Finland, if the reported timetable holds up.

The next set of technical races — Hirscher’s favored events — are Dec. 9-10.

Hirscher still would have easily won the World Cup overall title the last two years if excluding his points from Soelden and Levi.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Lindsey Vonn reveals her favorite medals (video)

time for a break 🙈

A post shared by Marcel Hirscher (@marcel__hirscher) on