Allyson Felix

Allyson Felix falls to track injured as Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce sprints to win 200 meters (video)

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The anticipated showdown between Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Allyson Felix in the 200 meters at the World Championships ended after about 50 meters when Felix pulled up and fell to the track with a torn right hamstring.

Fraser-Pryce went on to win the final in 22.17 seconds. The Ivory Coast’s Murielle Ahoure got silver in 22.32, and Nigeria’s Blessing Okagbare earned bronze in the same time.

As Fraser-Pryce celebrated, several people tried to help Felix onto a stretcher, but then brother Wes picked up Felix and carried her off the track. Felix was later put on a stretcher.

“I’m extremely devastated,” Felix said, according to USATF. “I was really hoping to go out there and put together a great race. Now I am consulting with doctors to figure out what is going on with my right hamstring. It is a serious injury, but I don’t know exactly to what extent. I wish all of my teammates the best for the rest of the meet.”

World Track and Field Championships broadcast schedule

The Jamaican Fraser-Pryce became the fourth woman to sweep the 100 and 200 at the World Championships, joining three Germans from 1983, 1987 and 1991.

“I was so nervous,” Fraser-Pryce told NBC Sports reporter Lewis Johnson on Universal Sports. “A couple years ago, I hated the 200. … I put my mind and energy and focus in the 200. It paid off.”

Felix, who shares the record for most career World Championship gold medals with eight, was thought to be a candidate for the 4×100 and/or 4×400 relays for the U.S. this weekend before the injury.

Felix, a three-time world champion in the 200, said before worlds that she would rather try to add the 400 meters to her schedule for the 2016 Olympics than the 100.

She ran the 100 and the 200 in London, winning the 200 and placing fifth in the 100. She ran the 400 at the 2011 World Championships and took silver in a personal best time, missing gold by .03 of a second.

Video: Bolt wins 200 semifinal, receives copy of lightning bolt photo | Farah doubles up

IOC president wants life bans for Russian cheats

DOHA, QATAR - NOVEMBER 16: IOC President Thomas Bach closing remarks during the fourth day of the 21st ANOC General Assembly at the Sheraton Grand Hotel on November 16, 2016 in Doha, Qatar. (Photo by Mark Runnacles/Getty Images for ANOC)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Russian athletes and officials who are proven to have been part of a doping “manipulation system” should be banned for life from the Olympics, IOC President Thomas Bach said Thursday.

Bach gave his personal view one day before Canadian investigator Richard McLaren publishes a final report into alleged state-backed cheating at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

Proof of systematic doping would be “aggravated circumstances” to justify life bans, the IOC leader said at a news conference after a three-day executive board meeting.

“I would not like to see this person again at any Olympic Games in any function,” Bach said, noting that as an IOC disciplinary commission chairman he approved life bans for Austrian team members implicated in doping at the 2006 Turin Winter Games.

However, proving that individual athletes knew of systematic doping involving state agencies could be difficult.

McLaren, who was appointed by the World Anti-Doping Agency in May, is expected to give more detail about cheating operations at the Sochi laboratory.

In his interim report in July, McLaren confirmed claims by former lab director Grigory Rodchenkov of a hole-in-the-wall swapping system aided by the FSB security agency to exchange athletes’ dirty urine samples for clean ones.

Earlier Thursday, the IOC member appointed to oversee disciplinary cases that arise from McLaren’s evidence acknowledged they could be tough to prove.

“Can you prove (athletes) were aware?” Denis Oswald, a Swiss lawyer, said on the sidelines of a sports law conference in Geneva.

“It is not that we would be scared to attack high level people in the Russian regime,” the Swiss lawyer said. “The question is more on the legal point of view. Can you punish athletes if they have done nothing and whether they were not aware of what was happening?”

Bach has also appointed a second IOC commission, headed by former Switzerland president Samuel Schmid, to evaluate if McLaren’s report and evidence proves a state-run doping system.

“And then based on that we will see if we can start cases against athletes,” Oswald said.

Meanwhile, United States lawmakers want Bach to attend a congressional committee hearing next Thursday to provide an update on sports’ fight against doping.

“Unfortunately I cannot attend there,” said Bach, adding that the IOC will “provide by other means all the information they may need.”

MORE: Russia sets 2018 Olympics medal target

IOC president doesn’t rule out awarding 2028 Olympic host in 2017

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 23: The Olympic Flag waves as part of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics Closing Ceremony at Fisht Olympic Stadium on February 23, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Joe Scarnici/Getty Images)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — IOC President Thomas Bach says he wants to change the Olympic host city bidding procedure because it “produces too many losers.”

Bach’s comments came on the same day the IOC executive board cleared all three candidate cities for the 2024 Olympics — Paris, Los Angeles and Budapest, Hungary — to advance to the next stage of the race.

Bach did not categorically rule out the possibility of awarding the hosting rights for two games at once — 2024 and 2028 — when the IOC votes next September in Lima, Peru.

Bach said at a news conference “it is not the purpose of an Olympic candidature procedure to produce losers.”

He said the goal is “to produce the best possible host for an Olympic Games.”

Asked about speculation the IOC could award the 2024 and 2028 Olympics at the same time, he said: “Let us study this question, which is not an easy one.”

VIDEO: LA 2024 Olympic bid venue plan