Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt lacking competition in 200-meter final Saturday; preview

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Usain Bolt dropped a starting block on his foot this week, but it’s going to take plenty more than that to worry him in the 200-meter final Saturday.

Bolt, aiming for triple gold at the World Championships, won his first round and semifinal of the 200 meters in Luzhniki Stadium on Friday. The Jamaican is a huge favorite to take his third straight world title in the 200 on Saturday (12:05 p.m. Eastern Time, NBC).

“My foot is feeling better,” Bolt told Reuters. “It was sore, but we’ve been working on it for four days.”

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Bolt has been more dominant in the 200 than the 100 during his illustrious career. He hasn’t lost the event at an Olympics or worlds since taking silver behind Tyson Gay at the 2007 World Championships when he was 21 years old.

The only time a competitor at an Olympics or worlds final lost by less than three tenths of a second since came in London, where Yohan Blake won silver .12 of a second behind Bolt.

This year’s final is missing the Olympic silver medalist Blake and reigning world silver and bronze medalists Walter Dix and Christophe Lemaitre, all due to injuries. U.S. champion Tyson Gay is also absent after failing drug tests, and Justin Gatlin, the silver medalist in the 100 in Moscow, isn’t running the 200.

Bolt was given a copy of the famous lightning bolt photo from Sunday’s 100-meter final by the BBC after winning his semifinal in 20.12.

“This is my 200 meters, means the world to me, so I’m ready to go,” Bolt told NBC Sports reporter Lewis Johnson on Universal Sports.

That leaves Jamaican Warren Weir, who won bronze in London, as the silver medal favorite. Weir is the third fastest man this year behind Bolt and Gay at 19.79 seconds, though he was beaten by American Curtis Mitchell in his semifinal.

“I delivered when I needed to,” Mitchell, who ran a personal best 19.97, told Johnson on Universal Sports. “Right now I’m going to build off this and hopefully carry the U.S. in the 200 meters the next six or seven years.”

Mitchell is in the medal discussion, but it could be a Jamaican sweep with Bolt, Weir and Nickel Ashmeade. Also watch South African Anaso Jobodwana, 21, who was .01 behind Bolt in their semifinal with a personal best 20.13. Brit Adam Gemili, 19, ran back-to-back personal bests in the first round and the semifinals.

If Bolt wins a medal of any color in the 200, he will pass Michael Johnson for the second most career medals by a man at the World Championships with nine. If he wins another medal in the 4×100 relay Sunday, he will match Carl Lewis for the most. If he wins gold in both events, he will also tie Lewis for the most golds won by a man with eight.

Final Field
1. Curtis Mitchell (USA) 19.97
2. Adam Gemili (GBR) 19.98
3. Nickel Ashmeade (JAM) 20.00
4. Usain Bolt (JAM) 20.12
5. Anaso Jobodwana (RSA) 20.13
5. Churandy Martina (NED) 20.13
7. Warren Weir (JAM) 20.20
8. Jaysuma Saidy Ndure (NOR) 20.33

Video: Mary Cain, 17, impresses at worlds 

Ryan Lochte, with new coach, races in first meet since Olympics

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Ryan Lochte is back in the competition pool.

The 12-time Olympic medalist, suspended from USA Swimming and international meets through June, won a 200-yard individual medley at the U.S. Masters nationals in Riverside, Calif., on Friday. He also finished second in a 100-yard breaststroke.

Full results are here.

“I’m a little overweight,” Lochte said, according to the Orange County Register. “I guess you could say six months of not taking care of my body and just living my life, not worrying about waking up and going to practice or anything like that. My main focus was to just relax, get away from the sport, and now that I’m getting back in I’m like, ‘Ooh, maybe I should have at least worked out a couple of times.'”

Lochte has moved to the Los Angeles area and is now coached by the University of Southern California’s Dave Salo until his fiancée’s baby is born (likely June). After that, they will re-evaluate his plan, Salo said.

Lochte was formerly coached by Gregg Troy from 2002-13 at the University of Florida, where he attended college and matured to become an Olympian in 2004. Lochte won 11 Olympic medals under Troy and became the world’s best swimmer going into the 2012 Olympics.

In 2013, Lochte moved from Gainesville to Charlotte and trained under David Marsh through the Rio Games. Lochte said last summer that he planned to move to California.

Lochte has also said he plans to try for a fifth Olympics in 2020, but his immediate future is about to get very busy — becoming a father, becoming a husband and the end of his ban.

He will swim two meets in August, the U.S. Open in East Meadow, N.Y., and an international meet in Rome, according to the Orange County Register.

“I’m behind, but you know,” Lochte said, according to the newspaper, adding he hasn’t been this happy since 2012. “I took time off. I needed it. My body and mind needed it to recover. It was just a dog fight for so many years I just got overwhelmed with the sport and lost the passion and the love for it. But now I have it. I have new passion, and I’m finding ways that swimming is fun again.”

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Jesse Owens’ Olympic gold medals up for auction

Jesse Owens
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Two of Jesse Owens‘ four 1936 Berlin Olympic gold medals will be auctioned in August, according to Heritage Auctions.

Owens won four gold medals at the Berlin Games, triumphing in the face of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany by taking the 100m, 200m, 4x100m relay and long jump.

Owens gifted one gold medal to entertainer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, according to “Mr. Bojangles: The Biography of Bill Robinson.”

That medal was auctioned for in 2013 for $1,466,574, the highest price ever for a piece of Olympic memorabilia.

Owens used his three other Olympic golds as payment for a Pittsburgh hotel stay in the mid-1950s, according to “Intelligent Collector,” a magazine affiliated with Heritage Auctions, which is housing the August auction with Owens’ medals.

“Jesse didn’t have the financial means to pay for his stay at Mr. Harry Bailey’s hotel,” said Albert DeVito, son of a local handyman who ended up with the two gold medals being auctioned, according to the magazine. “So he gave his medals to Harry as his payment for expenses incurred.”

DeVito’s father was later gifted the three gold medals by the hotel owner Bailey for previously lending him money. DeVito’s father kept two and gave back to Bailey one gold medal whose whereabouts are unknown, according to the magazine.

DeVito thought to sell the remaining two gold medals after seeing the 2013 auction.

“It wasn’t until that first gold medal sold that we even thought, ‘Oh, my goodness. These things are worth something!'” DeVito said, according to the magazine.

It’s unknown which of the gold medals corresponds to which Olympic event, as they are not specified on the medals.

Before Owens’ death in 1980, the sprinter reportedly said he had lost the four gold medals. The German government replaced them, and they now rest at Ohio State, Owens’ alma mater.

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