Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt lacking competition in 200-meter final Saturday; preview

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Usain Bolt dropped a starting block on his foot this week, but it’s going to take plenty more than that to worry him in the 200-meter final Saturday.

Bolt, aiming for triple gold at the World Championships, won his first round and semifinal of the 200 meters in Luzhniki Stadium on Friday. The Jamaican is a huge favorite to take his third straight world title in the 200 on Saturday (12:05 p.m. Eastern Time, NBC).

“My foot is feeling better,” Bolt told Reuters. “It was sore, but we’ve been working on it for four days.”

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Bolt has been more dominant in the 200 than the 100 during his illustrious career. He hasn’t lost the event at an Olympics or worlds since taking silver behind Tyson Gay at the 2007 World Championships when he was 21 years old.

The only time a competitor at an Olympics or worlds final lost by less than three tenths of a second since came in London, where Yohan Blake won silver .12 of a second behind Bolt.

This year’s final is missing the Olympic silver medalist Blake and reigning world silver and bronze medalists Walter Dix and Christophe Lemaitre, all due to injuries. U.S. champion Tyson Gay is also absent after failing drug tests, and Justin Gatlin, the silver medalist in the 100 in Moscow, isn’t running the 200.

Bolt was given a copy of the famous lightning bolt photo from Sunday’s 100-meter final by the BBC after winning his semifinal in 20.12.

“This is my 200 meters, means the world to me, so I’m ready to go,” Bolt told NBC Sports reporter Lewis Johnson on Universal Sports.

That leaves Jamaican Warren Weir, who won bronze in London, as the silver medal favorite. Weir is the third fastest man this year behind Bolt and Gay at 19.79 seconds, though he was beaten by American Curtis Mitchell in his semifinal.

“I delivered when I needed to,” Mitchell, who ran a personal best 19.97, told Johnson on Universal Sports. “Right now I’m going to build off this and hopefully carry the U.S. in the 200 meters the next six or seven years.”

Mitchell is in the medal discussion, but it could be a Jamaican sweep with Bolt, Weir and Nickel Ashmeade. Also watch South African Anaso Jobodwana, 21, who was .01 behind Bolt in their semifinal with a personal best 20.13. Brit Adam Gemili, 19, ran back-to-back personal bests in the first round and the semifinals.

If Bolt wins a medal of any color in the 200, he will pass Michael Johnson for the second most career medals by a man at the World Championships with nine. If he wins another medal in the 4×100 relay Sunday, he will match Carl Lewis for the most. If he wins gold in both events, he will also tie Lewis for the most golds won by a man with eight.

Final Field
1. Curtis Mitchell (USA) 19.97
2. Adam Gemili (GBR) 19.98
3. Nickel Ashmeade (JAM) 20.00
4. Usain Bolt (JAM) 20.12
5. Anaso Jobodwana (RSA) 20.13
5. Churandy Martina (NED) 20.13
7. Warren Weir (JAM) 20.20
8. Jaysuma Saidy Ndure (NOR) 20.33

Video: Mary Cain, 17, impresses at worlds 

Max Aaron retires from figure skating

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Max Aaron, a national champion and Skate America winner, has retired from competitive figure skating.

Aaron, 26, ends his career as the only Skate America men’s winner not to compete in an Olympics. He is one of three U.S. men’s champions in the last 55 years not to compete in an Olympics, along with Ryan Bradley and Rudy Galindo.

“Of course, becoming an Olympian, or having an Olympic medal would have been great to say, ride off on my white horse, but having the ability to say that I have no regrets in my entire career of figure skating, for me that is my gold medal,” Aaron said Thursday night.

Aaron, a former top USA Hockey developmental player, also figure skated growing up to help with his skating skills as one of the smaller players on his team.

He stopped playing hockey at 16 due to a broken vertebra but continued full-time with figure skating. By 2012, Aaron considered quitting figure skating after placing eighth at nationals (one year after being U.S. junior champion) and being told he wasn’t artistic enough.

But Aaron kept with it and completed a remarkable bounce back the next year, winning the U.S. title and setting himself up as a favorite to make the 2014 Olympic team.

But Aaron ended up third at the 2014 U.S. Championships. The two Sochi Olympic spots went to Jeremy Abbott and Jason Brown.

Aaron continued, becoming the first U.S. man to win Skate America in six years in 2015 and topping the short program at the 2016 U.S. Championships before ultimately finishing second to Adam Rippon.

Aaron plummeted to ninth at the 2017 U.S. Championships, coming back from offseason hernia surgery, but returned to the Olympic team radar last fall with a personal-best free skate at Cup of China, including three landed quadruple jumps. He went into the 2018 U.S. Championships ranking third among American men for the season.

But Aaron was again ninth at nationals, missing the Olympic team. He was called on to compete at last month’s world championships as the third alternate after Rippon, Ross Miner and Brown all passed.

Aaron had stopped skating and instead was training for a triathlon. He went to worlds in Milan on two weeks of training and finished 11th, a result that helped the U.S. keep three men’s spots for 2019 Worlds. Nathan Chen won the world title, but Vincent Zhou was 14th. The U.S. needed its second man to be 12th or better to go along with Chen’s first place to ensure three spots next year. Aaron reportedly said at worlds that it may have been his last competition.

Aaron said he’s started a job with Merrill Lynch.

“It’s really been a great ride. I have no regrets,” he said. “That’s one thing that I always told myself, in sport, in life, I want to have no regrets, and I can honestly say, with the help from my coaches and friends, that I have no regrets in the sport.”

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Martha, Bela Karolyi speak on Larry Nassar case (video)

Martha Karolyi, Bela Karolyi
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Former USA Gymnastics national team coordinators Martha and Bela Karolyi said they knew nothing about Larry Nassar‘s alleged abuse in an interview that airs on an hourlong NBC News “Dateline” special Sunday at 7 p.m. ET.

Star U.S. gymnasts, among more than 100 who said they were sexually abused by the convicted Nassar, said they were abused at the Karolyi’s ranch in Texas during national-team training camps.

“That’s awful, but I would say even if they have big names or they have no names, any child who was violated by Nassar, it’s a crime and it’s so sad,” Martha Karolyi told Savannah Guthrie in part of the interview that aired on TODAY on Friday.

How could the Karolyis not have known about the alleged abuses committed at their property?

“Yes, but if you couldn’t suspect anything, I heard during the testimonies that some of the parents were in therapy room with their own child and Larry Nassar was performing this — and the parent couldn’t see. How I could see?” Martha Karolyi said.

“The whole thing is just like an explosion, a bomb exploding, boom,” Bela Karolyi said.

Martha Karolyi led the national team for 15 years before retiring after the Rio Olympics. She told Guthrie that in “no way” did she suspect Nassar was sexually abusing athletes.

The Karolyis have been named as co-defendants in several civil lawsuits filed against Nassar and USA Gymnastics.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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