Usain Bolt, Warren Weir

Usain Bolt dominates 200 meters for another world championship (video)

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Usain Bolt made it look easy in making more history, winning the 200 meters in 19.66 seconds at the World Championships on Saturday.

Bolt, 26, became the first man to win three world titles in the 200 and remained undefeated over the distance at major international championships since his first Olympic gold in the event in 2008.

Bolt breezed past medal threat Adam Gemili of Great Britain on the turn and then slowed on the final straight so much so that silver medalist Warren Weir cut into Bolt’s winning margin. Weir was never a threat of passing Bolt in the final meters, though.

“I said that I want to be remembered like (Muhammad) Ali, Pele and the greats,” Bolt said, according to the Jamaica Gleaner. “This is another step towards that.”

Bolt’s winning time was by far his slowest at an Olympic or worlds final. His world record is 19.19, set at the 2009 World Championships. His slowest previous final was the 2011 worlds, where he won in 19.40 seconds.

Weir, the Olympic bronze medalist, won silver, matching his personal best of 19.79 seconds. American Curtis Mitchell earned bronze in 20.04, his first major international medal. (full results below)

“I just had to use all heart coming down the straight,” Mitchell told NBC Sports reporter Lewis Johnson. “For me to come out here and get a medal, it’s unbelievable.”

The final lacked the reigning Olympic silver medalist, the injured Yohan Blake, the defending world silver and bronze medalists, the injured Walter Dix and Christophe Lemaitre, as well as Americans Tyson Gay (failed drug tests) and Justin Gatlin (opted out of the 200 at nationals).

Bolt celebrated by taking a photographer’s camera and appearing to snap photos, just as he did at the 2012 Olympics. He and Weir danced to Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds,” according to The Associated Press. Bolt also wished good luck to each of his other seven competitors before the final.

The Jamaican now owns nine career world medals, second among men only to Carl Lewis‘ 10. His seven career world golds only trail Lewis and Michael Johnson (both have eight) among men.

The 19.66 matched Bolt’s 10th fastest time ever and Johnson’s first world record set in 1996, before Johnson reset it with a 19.32 in the Olympic final. Johnson is commentating for the BBC in Moscow this week.

Bolt can match both of those records as part of Jamaica’s 4×100 relay team on the final day of worlds Sunday. Jamaica hasn’t lost the 4×100 relay at a worlds or Olympics since 2007.

“I never get tired of shouldering the expectations of millions,” Bolt said, according to the Gleaner. “It keeps me going, I welcome it.”

Gold: Usain Bolt (JAM) 19.66

Silver: Warren Weir (JAM) 19.79
Bronze: Curtis Mitchell (USA) 20.04
4. Nickel Ashmeade (JAM) 20.05
5. Adam Gemili (GBR) 20.08
6. Anaso Jobodwana (RSA) 20.14
7. Churandy Martina (NED) 20.35
8. Jaysuma Saidy Ndure (NOR) 20.37

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Ashton Eaton named male IAAF Athlete of the Year

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American decathlete Ashton Eaton was named the 2015 male Athlete of the Year by the International Association of Athletics Federations, the world governing body for track and field. Ethiopia’s Genzebe Dibaba, the reigning world champion in the 1500m, was named the female IAAF Athlete of the Year.

Eaton is the first decathlete and just the eighth American man to win the title. Tyson Gay in 2007 was the last American man to be named.

The honor came due to Eaton’s world-record-setting performance at the world championships held in Beijing this past August. There he beat the previous record, his own from the 2012 Olympic Trials, by nine points. He also set a world record for running the fastest 400m portion of the decathlon in 45.00 seconds.

In the IAAF press release, Eaton said, “Athletes spend the most vigorous years of human life, arguably called the ‘best years’, working to hone their abilities. So, when an athlete competes, what people are witnessing is the manifestation of what a human being is capable of when they choose to direct all of their time and effort towards something.

“I’m grateful and thankful to the IAAF for excellent competitions, the canvases that allow us to display our work.”

He also acknowledged sprinter Usain Bolt and triple jumper Christian Taylor, who were also up for the title: “While I’m honored that I am considered the ‘artist’ of the year, I did not beat Usain and Christian; my work simply differed in design. They are some of the most talented and beautiful performers of all time. I’m flattered to be among them.”

Dibaba has been unbeaten in the 1500m over five races in 2015. Along with winning gold and setting a world record in the 1500 at the Beijing World Championships, Diababa won a bronze medal in the 5000m event.

She gratefully accepted the award, saying, “After being a finalist and narrowly missing out on this award one year ago, I am very proud to be recognized by the fans and experts of our sport.

“I had a great season and truly enjoyed competing around the world, from Monaco where I managed to establish a world record, to Beijing where I finally captured my first world outdoor title.”

Dibaba was recently featured in a family-themed promotional video for the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio.

MORE: Seb Coe splits from Nike as IAAF president


Olympians celebrate Thanksgiving

Meryl Davis
Team USA/ Twitter
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Nov. 26 – or Thanksgiving to the rest of us – is oftentimes a typical training day for many Olympians and Olympic hopefuls. Here’s a look at how some of them spent the day training, competing, celebrating, and being thankful.

Workout football and food😁👍!!! Happy thanksgiving everyone!!!

A photo posted by Michael Phelps (@m_phelps00) on

Happy Thanksgiving from our cold cuts Turkey to yours! #family #happyhappyheart

A photo posted by @cammileadams on

Happy Thanksgiving from the SwimMAC Parade crew!

A photo posted by Tyler Clary (@tylerclary) on


MORE: NBC’s Thanksgiving Rio promo