Shaun White

Shaun White out of New Zealand Winter Games slopestyle after training crash

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Two-time Olympic halfpipe champion Shaun White missed the slopestyle competition after a crash in training at the FIS World Cup stop in Cardrona, New Zealand.

White, 26, suffered an ankle injury, according to multiple reports out of New Zealand. It is unknown if White will be able to compete in the halfpipe. Qualifying starts Thursday.

White aims to win double gold at the Sochi Olympics, an eye on his third straight title in the halfpipe and a first in the new Olympic event of slopestyle. He won four straight Winter X Games titles in slopestyle from 2003-06 but took fifth at this year’s X Games.

If White is on his game in slopestyle in Sochi, he’ll have a showdown with Canadian Mark McMorris, 19, the two-time reigning X Games champion.

White’s band, Bad Things, will release its debut album Oct. 8, four months before the Olympics. White said he will tour with the band after the album comes out.

How White’s band became Lollapalooza headliner

LA 2024 Olympic bid budget one-quarter the size of Tokyo 2020

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The Los Angeles bid committee for the 2024 Olympics released details of a nearly unheard-of budget plan Friday, insisting $5.3 billion will be enough to cover both operational and infrastructure costs for an Olympics that won’t need any new, permanent stadiums.

The cost would be less than half that of the recently completed Rio Games and about a quarter of Tokyo’s ballooning budget for the 2020 Olympics.

It also defies convention in the Olympic bidding business, in which cities traditionally deal with two figures — one for operational costs and one for “non-Olympics” costs that cover capital and infrastructure.

Bid officials say they can do this because more than 30 venues already exist in the L.A. area and those that don’t will be built as temporary structures. The bid folded in $1.2 billion for infrastructure, which would primarily be used for temporary venues and to bring existing ones up to Olympic standards.

“If LA is chosen to host the 2024 Games, the IOC does not have to worry about changing or evolving budgets, shifting competition venues or uncertainty about the delivery of the Games,” bid chairman Casey Wasserman said.

Los Angeles is going against Paris and Budapest, Hungary. Preliminary figures for Paris called for an infrastructure budget of $4.5 billion and operational costs of $4.8 billion, with 95 percent of the city’s proposed venues either temporary or already in existence. The next deadline for cities to submit candidate files, which will include updated budget figures, is Feb. 3. The Games will be awarded next September.

Gone from Los Angeles’ budget was a one-time projected surplus of $161 million. In its place is a $491 million contingency fund that would cover cost overruns.

Wasserman said all the figures are conservative and the numbers come in low because no major construction projects are needed. Los Angeles has already committed to more than $200 billion in transit and airport projects, regardless of whether it wins the Olympic bid. Often, projects such as those get approved in conjunction with an Olympic bid.

In providing a $5.3 billion budget, Los Angeles is playing to the International Olympic Committee’s attempt to keep costs — and building — in check; decades of runaway spending have greatly reduced interest in hosting.

Rio de Janeiro is expected to come in with a bill of between $10 billion and $12 billion for its recently completed Olympics.

Meanwhile, Los Angeles released its figures only hours after an IOC vice president called Tokyo’s $20 billion budget unacceptable. A government panel in Japan has said costs could reach $30 billion, more than four times the initial estimate.

Wasserman said the IOC will not be surprised when it sees all items wrapped into a single L.A. budget.

“The process has been very open and transparent,” he said.

The budget was also being independently reviewed by the accounting firm KPMG, which was expected to release its findings later Friday.

The bid’s top revenue sources are domestic sponsorship ($1.93 billion), ticketing ($1.47 billion) and IOC contributions from broadcasting ($855 million) and sponsorship ($453 million).

VIDEO: Los Angeles Olympic bid venues

LA 2024 Olympic bid update on baseball/softball; basketball, soccer venues

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The Los Angeles 2024 Olympic bid committee hasn’t disclosed if it hopes for baseball and softball to be part of the Games, it said Friday.

Baseball and softball were added to the 2020 Olympic program in August, but are not yet on Olympic programs beyond that.

The International Olympic Committee’s Agenda 2020 allows local organizing committees to propose adding sports for their Games, which is what Tokyo 2020 did to get baseball, softball, skateboarding, surfing, sport climbing and karate onto its program.

In a 2015 bid book from LA 2024, Dodger Stadium was listed as a baseball and softball venue if the sports were part of the 2024 Olympic program. More recent LA 2024 bid books have not mentioned baseball or softball venues.

Los Angeles is bidding against Budapest and Paris for the 2024 Olympics. IOC members will vote to choose the host city in September.

Also Friday, LA 2024 said there won’t be any basketball venues outside of Los Angeles. Currently, Staples Center is the only proposed basketball venue, though five of the last six Olympic basketball tournaments have been split between two venues.

Last year, bid chairman Casey Wasserman said other cities in California could potentially host 2024 Olympic basketball games.

One sport that’s expected to be held at venues outside of Los Angeles — and outside California — is soccer.

Preliminary matches are slated to be “across America,” and while LA 2024 said Friday it has letters of interest from many U.S. soccer stadiums, they have not been chosen yet.

The Rose Bowl in Pasadena is scheduled to host at least some quarterfinals and semifinals and both finals.

In 1984, the soccer venues (men’s only) were the Rose Bowl, the stadiums at Stanford in California and Harvard in Massachusetts as well as in Annapolis, Md.

For Atlanta 1996, the soccer venues (men’s and women’s) were in Athens, Ga.; Birmingham, Ala.; Orlando, Miami and Washington, D.C.

VIDEO: LA 2024 Olympic venue plan