Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt completes triple gold worlds; U.S. doesn’t win gold medal count for first time since 1983

Leave a comment

Usain Bolt anchored the Jamaican 4×100-meter relay to gold in the final event of the World Track and Field Championships on Sunday, his third title of the meet that matched him with three of the greatest U.S. sprinters of all time.

Bolt took the baton close to even with American Justin Gatlin, but the U.S.’ final exchange was not as clean as Jamaica’s. Bolt opened up daylight quickly and held on to win in 37.36 seconds. Jamaica has won the 4×100 at five straight major international championships dating to the 2008 Olympics.

“I wasn’t really worried about Justin,” Bolt said, according to The Associated Press. “I knew if he got the baton in front of me, I could catch him. So it was just going out there to run as fast as possible.”

The U.S. got silver in 37.66. Great Britain crossed third but was disqualified for a pass out of the exchange zone, elevating Canada to bronze.

Bolt went three for three in gold medals (100, 200, 4×100) for the fourth time at a worlds or Olympics in his career. He now owns eight career World Championships gold medals, tying the record also held by Allyson FelixMichael Johnson and Carl Lewis.

Bolt also won his 10th career World Championships medal of any color, matching him with Lewis for the most by a man. Only Jamaican-turned-Slovenian Merlene Ottey has won more (14). Bolt said at the London Olympics he lost all respect for Lewis, who has criticized Jamaica’s drug-testing program.

“I’ll continue dominating,” Bolt said, according to the AP. I’ll continue to work hard. For me, my aim is to continue hard into the greatness thing.”

Bolt celebrated the 4×100 relay victory by flashing a smile after crossing the finish line, flipping the golden baton, taking off his Puma spikes, throwing them into the Moscow crowd and performing a barefoot dance on the track.

“I’m not even sure which country it’s from,” Bolt said, according to the AP. “It just went along with the music, so I did it.”

The U.S. finished the nine-day meet with the most overall medals (25 to Russia’s 17) but did not lead (or co-lead) the gold medal count for the first time at a worlds since the first edition in 1983.

Russia won seven golds, and the U.S. took six, its lowest total since 2001.

Jamaica also won the women’s 4×100 relay in 41.29 seconds on Sunday. The U.S., slowed by a poor relay exchange from Alexandria Anderson to third leg English Gardner, crossed second in 42.75, .03 of a second behind France. France was disqualified about three horus later, handing silver to the U.S. and bronze to Great Britain. Jamaican anchor Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce became the second woman to win three golds at a single worlds, joining Felix.

Thanks to Bolt and Fraser-Pryce, Jamaica swept the six sprint events for the first time.

Also Sunday, American Matthew Centrowitz won silver in the 1,500 meters. Will Claye and Christian Taylor went three-four in the triple jump, and Brenda Martinez and Alysia Montano went three-four in the 800 meters. 

The U.S. won a medal in the women’s 800 for the first time, and it became the first nation to ever win a medal in all four middle distance races.

Ashton Eaton, Brianne Theisen-Eaton dine on McDonald’s, get free Krispy Kreme

Olympians headline swimming’s Winter Nationals; Preview

Leave a comment

Michael Phelps, Missy Franklin and Nathan Adrian are among the Olympic gold medalists listed on the psych sheets for this weekend’s Winter Nationals in Federal Way, Wash.

Phelps’ lineup includes the 200m IM, 100m butterfly and 200m butterfly. At Summer Nationals in August, he clocked the fastest times in the world in each of those events.

“I already know what I can change in that event,” he told NBC Sports’ Carolyn Manno in a poolside interview immediately following his 200m IM.

Franklin is expected to swim the 50m freestyle, 100m freestyle, 200m freestyle, 100m backstroke, where she is seeded second behind Natalie Coughlin, and 200m backstroke.

Coughlin will also see action in the 50m and 100m freestyles. She said earlier in 2015 that the 100m backstroke may enter her repertoire again, and at the Pan American Games, her 100m backstroke leadoff leg in the medley relay was the fastest she’s been since the 2008 Beijing Games at 59.05.

MORE: Phelps, Franklin, Ledecky win to end Minneapolis meet

Adrian will swim the 50m freestyle, where he is ranked first, and the 100m freestyle, where he ranks third. However, both men faster than him in the 100m freestyle field represent non-U.S. countries internationally.

Allison Schmitt is slated to compete with Franklin in the 100m and 200m freestyles, in addition to the 400m freestyle. Katie Ledecky, who has dominated U.S. women’s freestyle events at all distances, is not expected at the meet.

Notable international names competing at the meet, like those ranked above Adrian in the 100m freestyle, include:

  • Olympic bronze medalist Vladimir Morozov (Russia): 100m freestyle, 50m freestyle, 100m breaststroke, 100m backstroke
  • Olympic gold medalist Ous Mellouli (Tunisia): 400m freestyle, 1500m freestyle, 400m IM
  • Olympic gold medalist Grant Hackett (Australia): 100m freestyle, 200m freestyle, 400m freestyle
  • World champion Yulia Efimova (Russia): 50m freestyle, 100m breaststroke, 200m breaststroke, 200m IM
  • Pan American Games medalist Santo Condorelli (Canada): 50m freestyle, 100m freestyle, 100m butterfly

A live webcast of the meet will be available on, including noon E.T. prelims and 9 p.m. E.T. finals beginning Thursday, Dec. 3 through Saturday, Dec. 5. NBC will air coverage on Sunday, Dec. 6 from 1-2 p.m. E.T.

MORE: Reece Whitley named Sports Illustrated’s Sportskid of the Year

Thomas Bach: Hamburg bid rejection is ‘missed opportunity’

Thomas Bach
Leave a comment

LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) The rejection of Hamburg’s bid for the 2024 Olympics marks a “missed opportunity” for the city and Germany, IOC President Thomas Bach said Monday.

Hamburg withdrew its bid Sunday after it was defeated in a referendum by voters in the northern port city. The vote was 51.6 percent against, and 48.4 percent in favor.

“The IOC of course respects the close vote by the citizens of Hamburg,” Bach said in a statement. “We regret the decision, which should be seen in the light of the very particular and difficult circumstances the referendum was held in. This is a missed opportunity for Hamburg and Germany.”

The vote came as Germany copes with an influx of migrants and refugees, a situation that Bach said “requires a great effort by German government and society and is causing widespread feelings of uncertainty.”

He also said the result may have been influenced by current doping and corruption scandals in sports. Without citing any by name, Bach alluded to the scandals surrounding FIFA, allegations of bribery involving Germany’s winning bid for the 2006 World Cup, and doping and corruption charges facing the IAAF and track and field.

“This is a pity,” Bach said, adding that the IOC applies strict anti-corruption rules.

The IOC president said the Hamburg vote was “greatly influenced” by the issue of how the games would be financed. Hamburg’s operating budget of 3.4 billion euros ($3.6 billion) was “very well balanced,” with the IOC planning to contribute $1.7 billion to the project, Bach said.

Hamburg’s withdrawal leaves four cities in contention: Rome, Paris, Los Angeles and Budapest, Hungary. The IOC will select the host city in September 2017.

“The IOC is proud to have four strong candidate cities,” Bach said.

A spokeswoman for Angela Merkel said the German chancellor regretted the decision by Hamburg voters.

Merkel “took note of the results of the vote in Hamburg, and the chancellor finds this decision regrettable but of course she respects the will of the people,” government spokeswoman Christiane Wirtz told reporters in Berlin.

“That’s why referendums are held – to find out what the population wants, and obviously Hamburgers don’t want the Olympics,” Wirtz said.

MORE: Soccer star Carli Lloyd and coach Jill Ellis nominated for FIFA honors