Oscar Pistorius

Oscar Pistorius indicted on murder charge, trial set to start March 3

1 Comment

Oscar Pistorius reportedly wept and prayed before being handed a copy of his indictment on a charge of murdering girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp at a Pretoria court Monday morning.

Pistorius’ trial will run from March 3-20, the court announced.

Pistorius shot and killed Steenkamp on Valentine’s Day morning in his Pretoria home. If convicted of premeditated murder, he faces a life sentence with at least 25 years in prison.

The defense said Pistorius thought Steenkamp was an intruder locked behind a bathroom door. The state will argue Steenkamp was hiding behind the bathroom door, fearing for her life, during the trial, City Press in South Africa reported Sunday.

The indictment (linked here) included 107 witnesses that the state could call on, including at least one of Pistorius’ ex-girlfriends, according to reports from the Pretoria courtroom. Some of the witnesses heard a woman scream, then gunshots, then more screaming, the indictment read, according to reports.

Steenkamp would have turned 30 years old Monday.

South African outlet News24 compiled a photo gallery of Pistorius’ appearance. He did not say much during the 12-minute proceedings after nearly an hour delay.

A report out of South Africa last week said Pistorius would face additional charges of recklessly discharging a gun in public in separate incidents, but those charges were not included in the indictment. The second charge in the indictment was the possession of illegal ammunition.

It was reported over the weekend that Pistorius told detectives how to access his iPhone but can’t remember a password to access his WhatsApp messages, according to the Star in South Africa.

“After months of SDHp pressing him he ­remembered the password to his iPhone 5 but we haven’t been in a position to open all his messages from the night of the shooting and the days before that,” a senior source at South Africa’s National Prosecuting Authority said, according to the Star.

The media attention on Pistorius has remained high in South Africa. He was recently spotted on a kayak, and that photo made the front page of the country’s leading Afrikaans-language newspaper.

In 2012, Pistorius became the first double leg amputee to compete in the Olympics when he ran the 400 meters and the 4×400-meter relay.

The World Track and Field Championships went on without Pistorius in Moscow last week. Olympic champion Kirani James, who exchanged nametags with Pistorius at the London Games, told The Associated Press he plans to frame the nametag.

“For him not to be here, it’s something the sport is missing,” James said, according to the AP.

Russian women’s sprinters cause stir with kiss

Yuzuru Hanyu tops Grand Prix Final short program

Yuzuru Hanyu
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Yuzuru Hanyu is well on his way to a record fourth straight Grand Prix Final title.

The Olympic champion landed two quadruple jumps while his closest rival, Spain’s Javier Fernandez, nearly fell twice in the short program in Marseille, France, on Thursday.

Hanyu tallied 106.53 points, the third-highest short program score under the decade-old scoring system, but said he wasn’t completely satisfied. Hanyu owns the five best short programs, all compiled in the last two seasons, with a best of 110.95.

“This program feels like a concert,” said Hanyu, who skated to Prince music in a purple outfit. “I consider this program cannot be completed without the audience.

“I feel this program has a lot more potential. I really wanted to improve my personal-best score here.”

Hanyu is trying to become the first singles skater to win four straight Grand Prix Finals in the event’s 22-year history.

He leads three-time Canadian world champion Patrick Chan by 6.77 points going into Saturday’s free skate. Chan’s clean short program included one quad and marked his first personal best in three years.

“The first good short program in a long time, internationally,” Chan said. “It didn’t feel any more special than any usual training day.”

Fernandez, who beat Hanyu at the last two world championships, nearly fell on a quad Salchow and a triple Axel and is in third, nearly 15 points back of Hanyu.

Fernandez was followed by Japan’s Shoma Uno and the two Americans, training partners Nathan Chen and Adam Rippon, in fifth and sixth in the six-skater field.

Chen, 17, fell on a quad flip and stepped out of a quad Lutz landing.

“I made two pretty big mistakes, so I’m a little bit upset about that,” Chen said, according to U.S. Figure Skating. “I was able to land the triple Axel, which I’m happy about because that’s always been my struggle jump.”

Rippon, 27, was the only skater to not attempt a quad.

“I’m trying the least amount of quads so my focus is to skate well overall,” Rippon said, according to U.S. Figure Skating. “I want to do my best and improve for the rest of the season.”

Chen and Rippon are the first American men in a Grand Prix Final, the second-biggest annual competition, since 2011.

The Grand Prix Final continues Friday with the short dance, pairs free skate and women’s short program (broadcast schedule here).

Earlier in pairs, Canadian world champions Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford struggled to third place in the short program. Duhamel fell on a throw triple Axel.

Russians Yevgenia Tarasova and Vladimir Morozov lead by 3.26 points going into Friday’s free skate.

MORE: Javier Fernandez builds toward last Olympic chance

Men’s Short Program
1. Yuzuru Hanyu (JPN) — 106.53
2. Patrick Chan (CAN) — 99.76
3. Javier Fernandez (ESP) — 91.76
4. Shoma Uno (JPN) — 86.82
5. Nathan Chen (USA) — 85.30
6. Adam Rippon (USA) — 83.93

Pairs Short Program
1. Yevgenia Tarasovana/Vladimir Morozov (RUS) — 78.60
2. Xiaoyu Yu/Hao Zhang (CHN) — 75.34
3. Meagan Duhamel/Eric Radford (CAN) — 71.44
4. Cheng Peng/Yang Jin (CHN) — 70.84
5. Natalya Zabiyako/Aleksander Enbert (RUS) — 65.79
6. Julianne Seguin/Charlie Bilodeau (CAN) — 60.86

IOC president wants life bans for Russian cheats

DOHA, QATAR - NOVEMBER 16: IOC President Thomas Bach closing remarks during the fourth day of the 21st ANOC General Assembly at the Sheraton Grand Hotel on November 16, 2016 in Doha, Qatar. (Photo by Mark Runnacles/Getty Images for ANOC)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Russian athletes and officials who are proven to have been part of a doping “manipulation system” should be banned for life from the Olympics, IOC President Thomas Bach said Thursday.

Bach gave his personal view one day before Canadian investigator Richard McLaren publishes a final report into alleged state-backed cheating at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

Proof of systematic doping would be “aggravated circumstances” to justify life bans, the IOC leader said at a news conference after a three-day executive board meeting.

“I would not like to see this person again at any Olympic Games in any function,” Bach said, noting that as an IOC disciplinary commission chairman he approved life bans for Austrian team members implicated in doping at the 2006 Turin Winter Games.

However, proving that individual athletes knew of systematic doping involving state agencies could be difficult.

McLaren, who was appointed by the World Anti-Doping Agency in May, is expected to give more detail about cheating operations at the Sochi laboratory.

In his interim report in July, McLaren confirmed claims by former lab director Grigory Rodchenkov of a hole-in-the-wall swapping system aided by the FSB security agency to exchange athletes’ dirty urine samples for clean ones.

Earlier Thursday, the IOC member appointed to oversee disciplinary cases that arise from McLaren’s evidence acknowledged they could be tough to prove.

“Can you prove (athletes) were aware?” Denis Oswald, a Swiss lawyer, said on the sidelines of a sports law conference in Geneva.

“It is not that we would be scared to attack high level people in the Russian regime,” the Swiss lawyer said. “The question is more on the legal point of view. Can you punish athletes if they have done nothing and whether they were not aware of what was happening?”

Bach has also appointed a second IOC commission, headed by former Switzerland president Samuel Schmid, to evaluate if McLaren’s report and evidence proves a state-run doping system.

“And then based on that we will see if we can start cases against athletes,” Oswald said.

Meanwhile, United States lawmakers want Bach to attend a congressional committee hearing next Thursday to provide an update on sports’ fight against doping.

“Unfortunately I cannot attend there,” said Bach, adding that the IOC will “provide by other means all the information they may need.”

MORE: Russia sets 2018 Olympics medal target