Galen Rupp

Galen Rupp has been drug tested 19 times this year; more USADA numbers

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The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has updated its athlete drug-testing history statistics with all in- and out-of-competition tests under its program from the second quarter of 2013.

Galen Rupp has been tested more than any other U.S. athlete this year, according to the statistics. The distance runner was tested 19 times in six months, four more than swimmer Missy Franklin and six more than Nike Oregon Project partner Dathan Ritzenhein and another swimmer, Ryan Lochte.

The testing statistics are more notable this quarter than others given recent drug-testing news. USADA reported a total of 1,818 in- and out-of-competition tests over a three-month period. Sports Illustrated reported Jamaica’s anti-doping commission conducted one total out-of-competition test during the same period last year.

Then there’s the fact that two of the top four tested athletes in 2013 are Nike Oregon Project runners. Earlier this week, the Telegraph published a story with comments from Nike Oregon Project coach Alberto Salazar about people questioning his top runner, Britain’s Mo Farah.

“It bothers me when people question my integrity,” Salazar told the newspaper. “But the way I look at it, if you don’t want people to say things about you, go run real crappy and then nobody will talk about you. At this level, we know we’re clean. We know we’re never going to test positive for anything. No way in the world. I have a clear conscience.”

Tyson Gay, who has reportedly failed multiple drug tests this year, was tested seven times in the second quarter of 2013, the period during which he failed at least one out-of-competition test.

Lindsey Vonn was the subject of headlines for being tested at the Council of Fashion Designers of America Awards in June, but that was just one of her three out-of-competition tests during the three-month period. Shaun White was not tested once, but that’s not a surprise given his season was over and no skier or snowboarder was tested more than three times.

Back to Rupp. He was tested 17 times all of last year in USADA’s statistics. The most tested U.S. athlete of 2012? Triathlete Matt Chrabot with 25.

It’s also interesting to look at who was or wasn’t tested when considering retirement announcements. Some athletes will retire but keep their name in drug-testing pools in case they reconsider. It can be a months-long process to get back into competition if an athlete retires and takes his or her name out of testing pools.

Michael Phelps has yet to be tested in 2013, keeping in line with his retirement. Two other athletes who have retired, swimmer Peter Vanderkaay and short track speedskater Katherine Reutter, were both tested in the last three months. This doesn’t mean that Vanderkaay and Reutter are contemplating comebacks, but that they could come back with less hassle if they wanted to.

You can search USADA’s database of drug-testing statistics here.

WADA says it will investigate Jamaica’s drug testing

‘Olympic Pride, American Prejudice’ film on Berlin 1936 on the way

Jesse Owens
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“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,” a documentary on 18 African-American Olympians at the Berlin 1936 Games, is set to be screened in the spring and be narrated and executive produced by Blair Underwood, according to Variety.

The group of 18, headlined by Jesse Owens, competed in the face of Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler on the brink of World War II.

Trailers for the film are here and here.

From the film’s website:

“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice is a feature length documentary exploring the trials and triumphs of 18 African American Olympians in 1936. Set against the strained and turbulent atmosphere of a racially divided America, which was torn between boycotting Hitler’s Olympics or participating in the Third Reich’s grandest affair, the film follows 16 men and two women before, during and after their heroic turn at the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin. They represented a country that considered them second class citizens and competed in a country that rolled out the red carpet in spite of an undercurrent of Aryan superiority and anti-Semitism. They carried the weight of a race on their shoulders and did the unexpected with grace and dignity.

The athletes experienced things that they were not expecting—applause, warm welcomes, integrated Olympic villages and the respect of their competitors. They were world heroes yet returned home to a short-lived glory. This story is complicated. This story is triumphant but unheralded.”

MORE: See ‘Race’ film poster

Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims’ families detail massacre in documentary

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Family members of the Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims “described the extent of the cruelty” in interviews for “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” an upcoming documentary on the massacre, according to The New York Times.

Eleven Israeli athletes and officials were killed after being taken hostage by a Palestinian group in the athletes’ village nearly 40 years ago, with nine dying in a failed rescue attempt.

In 1992, widows of two of the victims learned details of how the athletes and officials were treated — including via graphic photographs — and recently spoke publicly about it, according to the newspaper.

“What they did is that they cut off his genitals through his underwear and abused him,” Ilana Romano said through a translator of husband Yossef Romano, an Olympic weightlifter, according to the newspaper. “Can you imagine the nine others sitting around tied up? They watched this.”

The documentary “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” announced earlier this year, is set to be released in early 2016. Here’s an interview with one of the film’s producers.

In 2014, it was announced that a $2.3 million memorial in Munich was planned to remember the victims, with the International Olympic Committee contributing $250,000.

At Rio 2016, a moment of remembrance will be held during the Closing Ceremony and a special mourning area will be in the Olympic village to honor those who have died during an Olympic Games.

PHOTOS: Munich 1972 Olympic sites, including massacre site