Ryan Miller

Sidney Crosby, Ryan Miller asked to recall 2010 Olympic golden goal

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There isn’t a whole lot of skating going on at the U.S. and Canada men’s hockey orientation camps, but there has been a bit of talking.

Of the more interesting shared topics is the most memorable moment of the 2010 Vancouver Olympics — Sidney Crosby‘s overtime goal past U.S. goalie Ryan Miller in the gold-medal game that lifted Canada over the U.S. on the final day of the Games.

Both players were asked about the moment at their orientation camps. Neither seemed too interested in reflecting.

“I don’t think about it that much,” Crosby told the Calgary Sun. “Coming to this (camp) almost allows you turn the page a little bit on it. This is a new Olympics. It’s a great memory, don’t get me wrong, but this is a new challenge.”

Miller expounded a little more.

“No, it’s not something I want to beat myself up about,” Miller told CSN Washington. “I played the tournament aggressively. I saw an opportunity. He obviously didn’t mishandle the puck, but the puck came into his skates on the pass.

“I thought he was going to change his angle, and he didn’t. I made a decision that I anticipated something to happen, and it didn’t happen. I made a mistake, and it went in the net.

“No one feels worse than I did. You get over it and keep playing.”

Crosby is pretty much assured of a spot on the Canadian Olympic team in Sochi, assuming he’s healthy.

Miller, though, is in a fight to make the U.S. team. Jonathan Quick of the Los Angeles Kings is seen as the No. 1 right now. Miller, 33, is likely in competition with Jimmy HowardCory Schneider and Craig Anderson for one of the other two spots. His play with the Sabres over the early part of the NHL season will be key before the U.S. team is named in January.

For more coverage of the U.S. and Canada orientation camps, check out ProHockeyTalk and follow NBC Olympic researchers John Howe and Alex Goldberger on Twitter.

Photos: Crosby’s golden goal in 2010

Jan Hudec, Olympic bronze medalist skier, switches from Canada to Czech Republic

Jan Hudec
Getty Images
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Co-Olympic super-G bronze medalist Jan Hudec was granted a request by Alpine Canada to represent the Czech Republic next season after being left off Canada’s national team.

Hudec, 34, wasn’t eligible for Canada’s national team after racing once in 2015-16 due to the latest of his many knee surgeries, according to Alpine Canada.

“It is important to know that we continued to work with Jan after the team selection was announced, and let him know that we were more then willing to find accommodation that would enable him to return to the team,” Alpine Canada said in a press release. “However, at this stage of Jan’s career, he is making a decision that can best meet his desire to fulfill and lead a different way of life, that reaches beyond ski racing.”

The International Ski Federation must still grant Hudec’s request. Hudec was born in the Czech Republic.

At the Sochi Olympics, Hudec shared bronze with Bode Miller in the super-G. He is also the 2007 World Championships downhill silver medalist and a two-time winner of World Cup races.

The 2016-17 Alpine skiing World Cup season is expected to begin in Soelden, Austria, in late October.

MORE: Bode Miller says ‘good likelihood’ of comeback

Triplets set for Olympic history in Rio (video)

Luik sisters
NBC News
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Estonian sisters Leila, Liina and Lily Luik are set to become what is believed to be the first set of triplets to compete in an Olympics, according to Games historians.

The Luiks, identical triplets born Oct. 14, 1985, remain the only Estonian women to meet the Olympic qualifying time for the marathon. And since a nation can send three qualified athletes to the Olympic marathon, all three are in line to go to Rio.

The Estonia athletics federation’s qualifying cutoff is Wednesday. It doesn’t believe any other Estonians will register an Olympic qualifying time by then.

With most marathons taking place on weekends, it appears the Luiks are safe, even though none has run faster than 2:37, and the Olympic medal winners will likely be running in the low-to-mid 2:20s.

MORE: Ethiopian legend not on Olympic marathon team